Asiana Flight 214 Crashes at SFO

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This topic contains 100 replies, has 36 voices, and was last updated by  Swissdiver 26 Jun 2014
at 08:45
.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 101 total)

  • JordanD
    Participant

    Indeed Martyn; the South Korean Ministry of Transport “reported the captain (43, ATPL, 9,793 hours total) of the ill-fated flight was still under supervision doing his first landing into San Francisco on a Boeing 777, although he had 29 landings into San Francisco on other aircraft types before.” (Source: website below)

    May I suggest readers take a look at the latest updates on the AV Herald website, which give the NTSB read outs of the final approach:

    http://avherald.com/h?article=464ef64f&opt=0


    canucklad
    Participant

    Hi Craig and Martyn…

    My premise is based on Ian’s post earlier at 04.02…..and the reliance on automation……

    Then add in a shimmering sea, a runway that is also heat shimmering…then a visual glance can suddenly become disorientating….especially if you believe your instruments are correct….

    Bluntly put…it looked like the plane landed early and the crew didn’t realise until too late that they weren’t above the threshold…


    StandingThemUp
    Participant

    With PAPI available, there should have been no doubt about the glidepath required, that’s why they are there, shimmering sea and sun notwithstanding.


    craigwatson
    Participant

    The fact that the speed was so low, to me, means that they were well out of touch with what was going on around them.

    Are we sure the PAPI’s were working? I had heard they were U/S as well, not that that should make any difference.


    StandingThemUp
    Participant

    craig, are you 777 rated perchane?

    IIRC (some years ago) a 777 driver told me there is a mode named FLCH that can be used to get down very quickly, but the autothrust ‘goes to sleep’ and the speed can decay quite quickly.

    Of course, I don’t know if that happened here, but I could imagine a scenario where it occurred.

    The small planes I used had this type of failure hard coded into them, as the autopilot could command a rate of climb or descent in a VS mode, but there was no autothrottle, so you had to be very careful. Inadvertent selection could be disastrous.

    Apparently the PAPIs were available, until wiped out by the crash.


    craigwatson
    Participant

    not rated on a 777, but I have heard rumors that they were in FLCH


    BigDog.
    Participant

    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    An approach over water brings the same “awareness” issues as an approach over a desert. As others have said, it should be normal for a pro pilot as it should be for a well trained non pro pilot.


    Cloud-9
    Participant

    I heard that one of the dead schoolgirls actually survived the crash, but was killed by an emergency vehicle.

    Does anybody have any further info on the veracity or not of this?


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    There were also reports today that a couple of flight attendants were ejected from the B777 when it crashed. Both are alive to tell the tale but must have been badly injured.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-57593064/2-asiana-flight-attendants-ejected-in-crash-and-found-on-runway-feds-say/


    canucklad
    Participant

    It’s getting worse for the crew, without knowing the finite details…according to this mornings news…..

    The order to evacuate took 90 seconds after the plane came to a stop.

    Raises a couple of serious questions about “behavioural recruitment and training” …It might explain the passenger’s hand luggage behaviour.

    1) Why did the cockpit crew not understand the critical situation they where in?
    2) Almost proving the point of previous comments….seeing the destruction in front of them why did the cabin crew not use their imitative and take immediate action to evacuate?

    Not sure if I would be 100% comfortable flying this airline now !


    JonathanM8
    Participant

    The flight attendents who were thrown out of the rear of the plane were obviously on the jump seats at the back of the cabin in the rear galley area. Amazing, really, that they survived this, given that the aircraft was travelling at over 100mph as it struck the sea wall.


    superchris
    Participant

    Im also reading the pilots are claiming they saw a flash of light, a laser which distracted them……


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    This is an interesting simulation of the accident… which includes ATC recordings.

    http://mashable.com/2013/07/14/flight-214-animation/


    AllOverTheGaff
    Participant

    Wow, very scary sim.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 101 total)
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