Asiana Flight 214 Crashes at SFO

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This topic contains 100 replies, has 36 voices, and was last updated by  Swissdiver 26 Jun 2014
at 08:45
.

Viewing 11 posts - 91 through 101 (of 101 total)

  • superchris
    Participant

    can I ask a very silly question (for which I know the forum will chastise me for!), but with doors ‘set to automatic’ as they would be as the aircraft is coming into land, does presumably someone not have to ‘set them to manual’ prior to them being able to be opened? and what happens if all the flight crew, and or cabin crew are incapacitated?

    Ive always wondered what the relevance of doors being set to automatic, when they show you in the safety video some passenger just ‘popping the doors’??


    canucklad
    Participant

    Hi superchris……

    Should probably leave this one to one of our distinguished crew contributors’ to answer….

    But I’ve always assumed that automatic means that the chutes are armed…so they can still be opened but you’re going to get a hell of a lot of rubber!!


    superchris
    Participant

    that makes sense, thank you.


    BigDog.
    Participant

    @superchris. Being 2m tall, in my younger days flying economy I could get an over wing exit seat at check-in. (In the days when obvious need trumped want or status)
    Passengers in those seats were given instruction (backed up with a A4 laminate picture card) on opening them if necessary as they were not manned.


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Hello superchris

    Not sure if you read some of the earlier postings … but I did post a link to a media interview conducted after the crash. Here’s the link again:

    http://www.ajc.com/news/ap/transportation/asiana-says-pilot-had-little-experience-on-777s/nYf7h/

    What hasn’t yet been explained is why two chutes deployed inside the B777. As you will read, two members of cabin crew were pinned to the ground by the chutes. Other crew members had to strike the chutes with an axe (or axes) to get them to deflate and so free the trapped attendants.


    bacrew1
    Participant

    I am trained to initiate an evacuation myself should I deem the situation as “clearly catastrophic”….. so having the tail ripped off, 2 colleagues slung out the back and a big gaping hole at the rear end of a 777, I’d definitely deem it catastrophic!

    Regarding crew grabbing bags off of passengers as they evacuate, this simply isn’t possible.. Next time you get on a plane, check the door area… there’s a small space for crew to stand in with a grab assist handle…. We need to hold onto this whilst opening the door in an emergency, PLUS during an evacuation…. releasing that we could get caught up in the evacuation and get dragged/knocked out ourselves.


    StandingThemUp
    Participant

    “I am trained to initiate an evacuation myself should I deem the situation as “clearly catastrophic”….. so having the tail ripped off, 2 colleagues slung out the back and a big gaping hole at the rear end of a 777, I’d definitely deem it catastrophic!”

    Not to mention an engine departing the airframe and the landing gear being ripped off.

    If I’d been near an exit row, I’d have checked for flames, opened the door and gone, if the crew didn’t initiate.


    Swissdiver
    Participant

    While the investigation is not over, it seems we have here an example of failed training process described in this interesting article: http://www.wral.com/ntsb-to-review-asiana-crash-at-hearing-wednesday/13203368/


    BA4ever
    Participant

    Shocking!!!


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    Swissdiver
    Participant

    Thanks, Ian.

    So no big surprise here…

    P.S.: I like the animation (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MFPSfGoT1U)

Viewing 11 posts - 91 through 101 (of 101 total)
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