Emirates service deteriorating

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This topic contains 53 replies, has 22 voices, and was last updated by  K1ngston 9 Sep 2017
at 09:18
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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 57 total)

  • Steve
    Participant

    I have been flying to HKG and other Asia cities with them regular past 3 years, approx every 2 months. I moved over to them after QR prices went silly. I have not had any issues nor seen any real service drop. The only issue I had was recently on checked luggage being interlined when I didn’t want it but that was as much my fault as theirs. If anything, the onboard service has improved as has the food. My last flight was on Sunday KUL to BHX and everything was perfect


    DavidRenton
    Participant

    I’ve had a very mixed experience. My BHX-DXB leg was in an A380, service was slow, staff were friendly. The DXB-SYD service was horrific, with only one drinks service the entire flight, and tuts and head shakes if anyone dared press the call bell. I’m using them this year for connections to Far East, and will reconsider my options next year. I find their customer service teams in DXB very blasé, and in no way willing to help. I also had a recent flight change (dropped one of the daily BHX) and my only option was to fly the previous evening. I need to find accommodation at my cost, and they wouldn’t even offer a free seat allocation for the inconvenience. Their response was its my option to reschedule when I could cancel!


    trishab
    Participant

    Not a frequent flyer but have used Emirates a couple of times per year. One thing I have noticed which concerns me is cabin crew continuing to serve alcohol to obviously drunk passengers. The last time this happened, the crew member did refuse to serve the passenger who then asked for a more senior crew member…who let him have not one, but two more alcoholic drinks. On landing in Dubai, the passenger then left his seat to use the toilet and the crew had trouble getting him to return and fasten his seat belt. To my mind this is not just falling standards, but a safety issue as well.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    As the leading carrier of the Islamic UAE, they should adhere to the Muslim code and stop serving alcohol. Then as a next step perhaps they might do something about the prostitution and alcohol abuse which are so important to their tourist industry and the airline’s revenue.

    But of course they will continue to turn a blind eye to it. Hypocrites.


    Andrew
    Participant

    I looked at flights to KUL recently. Emirates charge £20 a sector for advance seat selection – that’s £80 on top of the fare. So I’m trying Qatar instead.


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    DavidRenton – Were you booked in Y or J ? Not good if you were booked in J.

    Andrew – Emirates has been charging for seat selection since October 2016.

    Emirates introduces extra fees for seat selection


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    As the leading carrier of the Islamic UAE, they should adhere to the Muslim code and stop serving alcohol. Then as a next step perhaps they might do something about the prostitution and alcohol abuse which are so important to their tourist industry and the airline’s revenue.

    But of course they will continue to turn a blind eye to it. Hypocrites.

    Absolutely. Except… Airlines aren’t (generally) in the job of enforcing moral codes. If they were, the situation on Emirates would be much worse. They wouldn’t allow women to sit next to men (other than husbands/brothers), would stand by and not intervene if they saw a man beating a woman, would refuse to accept a complaint from one female passenger unless corroborated by someone else since it takes two female witnesses to be equivalent to one male because “if one errs, the other can remind her”, and would condone the idea that men are superior and have authority over women. Qu’ran references for these available on request.

    Lest anyone think I am being randomly anti-Islam, let me offer a counterpoint.

    El Al, meanwhile, would take all crockery and cutlery used by Gentiles and bury it in the earth for three months before it can be used again by Jewish passengers, refuse passage to those who cut their hair at their temples and, of course, refuse to carry women teachers, would stone female passengers who have sex outside marriage (presumably this should happen at check-in, in the lounge, or at the gate, rather than on board – the cost of carrying the stones and cleaning the plane afterwards would be prohibitive)…. Oh, and if there is an altercation on board and a wife, defending her husband, lays her hands on her husband’s opponent’s privates, they would take her into the galley and cut her hand off. Old Testament references available for these, on request as well.

    Plenty of other religions for me to have a pop at. I just chose those of the one you cited, and the obvious counterpart (Judaism and the national airline of Israel).

    The reality is that airlines are commercial enterprises. Some choose to apply elements of their home country’s moral or legal code (no alcohol on Saudia or Egyptair, for example) – whether that is as a matter of principle and/or because their home base requires it by law, I can’t comment. In the case of Emirates, I believe alcohol is not completely forbidden by law in Dubai so presumably any enforcement would be only on moral grounds.

    Meanwhile, some airlines impose restrictions, I suspect, as a matter of cost saving, as witness the recent change by Malaysian that no alcohol is served on flights of less than three hours (I would love to hear that being justified theologically, especially if I was allowed to heckle). Some airlines (I am venturing into dangerous territory here – even more dangerous than what I said above – so I won’t give names) are proud to showcase their country’s heritage, culture and traditions and produce local products, recipes, and so forth; while others just shove bland offerings in their customers’ general direction, sometimes at an exorbitant charge, regardless of any moral code!

    Personally, although I generally don’t drink on flights any more, and can’t eat cheese (which rules out a surprisingly large number of national/heritage foods), I like it when an airline does the whole “showcase” thing – but only to the extent it enhances my choice and comfort. I would not, by choice (even if not drinking!) fly a dry airline, nor a vegetarian one, just as I wouldn’t fly one that only routed flights along ley lines or wouldn’t fly on certain days of the week or said I should pray three times during the flight!

    In case you hadn’t already guessed, I’m not very religious. I respect, up to a point, everyone’s right to their own beliefs and moral code. In fact, I have huge admiration and envy for those who do have religion/faith. Genuine envy. I wish I could be certain that I was not already half-way through all the experiences I could ever have. Somehow, the idea of eternal life, though terrifying, is not quite as terrifying – or terminal – as the idea that in a hundred years’ time all meaningful trace of my existence, or my ability to experience anything, will have ceased. I with I had the faith to believe that somehow, I would still be around to have that experience. Sadly, I don’t have that (yet! – there is still hope).

    Having said that, however, I do not agree (in fact, I very fundamentally disagree) with the proposition that another person’s religious or moral beliefs should affect my own behaviour or freedoms if I don’t voluntarily accept them. I live in Hong Kong, and I accept the cultural limitations that involves (which are few and far between, to be honest) because that is a matter of choice. However, if I am seated on an aeroplane and choose to have a glass of wine and my neighbour protests that alcohol is against his or her religion and therefore I shouldn’t have it in his/her presence, I am going to have a field day. Mention will be made of my erstwhile religion, the place of wine as part of the sacrament, the dire insult that would occur if s/he were to refuse my offer to share therein (and the very explicit threat that I will make that offer very soon), their incumbent obligation to partake OR, if they feel that one person’s religion should not trump the religion of others, the idea that they should jolly well **** off and keep their beliefs to themselves.

    Like many people who do have faith (although sadly not all of them) I do realise that there are flaws in my philosophy. Inconsistencies as well, no doubt. For example, I do not believe it is justifiable for someone, on religious grounds, to insist that the animals slaughtered for their consumption should undergo unnecessary suffering. In this regard, for example, I was hugely disappointed to see that QANTAS switched to halal-only meat following their tie-up with Emirates (similar argument for kosher meat or any other slaughtering method that doesn’t involve stunning the animal first or making slaughter instantaneous). However, I am a very happy carnivore. I really don’t have a problem with the concept of killing animals for food. No doubt many can fault me for this, and with some justification. But honestly – show me a vegan, and I will show you a hypocrite.

    Anyway, I have digressed far much already.

    Probably time for me to confess that I have never flown on Emirates (ouch!!)


    capetonianm
    Participant

    IanFromHKG : Many thanks for your reply. Normally when I express my view about EK/DXB I get abusive responses.

    In many areas I share the views you have expressed above, and I should make clear that I am not anti-Islam, I regard most formal religions in the same way, as a form of brainwashing and restricting personal freedoms. My view of DXB is based upon my complete and utter contempt for the double standards that prevail there, and not because I am anti-Islam, nor do I have a problem with alcohol or prostitution, nor with anything other people do as long as it doesn’t impact me. By all means be a vegan / vegetarian / rabid practitioner of religion / gay / yurt dweller / sandal wearer or anything else, but don’t try to sell it to me.

    I also abhor cruelty to animals (such as bull-torturing) but I too am a ‘happy carnivore’, in fact am about to head down to the butcher and buy some pork fillet and chops for a braai (BBQ) tonight. There’s a degree of hypocrisy there, and that applies to most people in some way.

    I admit to having flown on EK, twice in fact, the first time was when I went to DXB for a meeting, and had I known then what I know now about the place and its vile abuses I would have refused to go, and the second time was to visit a close friend who lived there and was very ill and he and his wife thought it would be my last chance to see him alive. Did one trip in economy, it was pretty miserable, and the other in business, which was good. However the last one was over 12 years ago and I understand it’s a lot worse now.

    I’ve not flown on LY, nor been to Israel, and I won’t. I have huge respect for them though for the way they operate security, it’s done efficiently and rigorously and without regard for political correctness, unlike the time wasting farce that passes for security elsewhere.


    ccCookie
    Participant

    IanFromHKG: Love your post. Met a guy ‘Dan’ from Hong Kong at a bar here in Dubai a long time ago (January 2013.) We ended up at a location of the type decried by capetonianm (but they really do have the best band in Dubai, along with the other distractions.) I promised that I would look him up if ever I was in Hong Kong. You probably know him (since truth is stranger than fiction.) Tell him I may still get there 🙂

    On the downside, the FF programme Skywards is one of the meaner ones

    Yes, FDOS_UK, I regret that Emirates kicked the tar out of Skywards. I used to look forward to being able to upgrade to Business class with miles (the only reasonable use for them I think.) On a flight from Toronto to DXB in 2014 I upgraded to Business with 57,500 miles. Now, your ticket needs to be ‘Flex’ to be able to upgrade to Singapore for as little as 50,700 miles. Before these Saver, Flex, and Flex Plus categories were adopted by Emirates, both earning miles and upgrading with miles were far better deals.

    Interestingly, just this past July I upgraded (on a flight to Singapore) for AED 1836.94. In December 2012 (twelve) I did similarly … and for AED 1800. In the intervening years, the same upgrade offer to Singapore (sent pre-flight by e-mail) has been for “only USD 800.”

    I’m sure I don’t fly as much as the rest of the participants here, but when I do I try to get the A380, Business class, and kill time with a few drinks at the bar. Frequently my companion and I are the only ones at the bar. I don’t see the drunkenness that others have commented on. This is a good thing, of course, but I’ve always been curious why there is at most only a few people that use the bar. I have a few drinks, and sleep. Sleeping is difficult for me in Economy, and so I find Business a blessing.

    A couple of trivial cutbacks: No longer do they give packages of playing cards in Business, nor the little piece of chocolate with dinner. In 6 years of travelling to Singapore from Dubai with them (over 20 times) these are the only changes I have noticed. Of course, the loyalty program changes are big.


    DavidRenton
    Participant

    Hi Alex,

    Sadly only Y on this occasion. My flight was moved 5-6 hours later and I would miss the SIN connection, losing 24 hours. It’s more the principal that they impacted my trip by a 24 hour loss, and it was my choice not to cancel but to try and salvage.


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Thanks for clarifying, David.

    EK is one airline not observing EU261 in respect of flight delays.

    http://www.caa.co.uk/News/Five-major-airlines-face-enforcement-action-for-denying-passengers-compensation-for-delayed-flights/


    DavidRenton
    Participant

    No worries. When I can visit Dubai x 2, Tokyo, and Singapore for under £1000 in total, it definitely swings my custom. Next year I’ll be looking elsewhere for my loyalty.

    CS recovery is a major key for me. To date, EK have never recovered service issues, I think they think they’re too big to bother. What do you think?


    paulkaz
    Participant

    IanFromHKG great post,I also regret not being a follower of religion. Australian billionaire Kerry Packer once said,after suffering a heart attack and being clinically dead for 6 minutes,
    “I’ve been to the other side,and let me tell you son,there’s f..king nothing there.”
    That said I do like to fly Thai hoping that,in the case of calamity,I’ll get swept up with all the buddhists to their after life if only for the food!


    capetonianm
    Participant

    We ended up at a location of the type decried by capetonianm

    I don’t have a problem at all with brothels, nightclubs, bars, drinking, prostitution etc, I simply detest the horrendously hypocritical stance of an Islamic regime which punishes people for sex outside marriage when it suits them to do so, but which builds its tourism industry on sex tourism.

    http://www.smh.com.au/world/dubai-in-united-arab-emirates-an-epicentre-of-human-trafficking-and-prostitution-20160115-gm6mdl.html

    Dubai in United Arab Emirates a centre of human trafficking and prostitution

    The country, and especially Dubai, one of the seven emirates, is known as a centre for prostitution and sex tourism in the Middle East. Some estimates have as many as 30,000 sex workers in Dubai alone.

    It is one of the many in the emirate where prostitutes offer their services openly, even though prostitution is strictly forbidden in the UAE and sharia courts can impose flogging as punishment.

    Sex services in the country are also openly advertised on websites and social media. How many women do this work of their own free will and how many are coerced is unknown, says Sara Suhail, director of the Ewa’a shelters for trafficked women and children. Most of the victims had been offered a respectable job as a receptionist in a hotel or as a secretary in the UAE while still in their home countries, she explains from her office at a shelter in an Abu Dhabi suburb. “They are often lured to the country by a friend or family member and don’t suspect anything.”

    In a dark basement bar below a hotel in the old centre of Dubai, women from countries such as Vietnam, China, Ethiopia, and Uganda working as prostitutes wait for customers. Visitors were all men, mainly Westerners.

    An activist for migrants’ rights from one of the Persian Gulf countries, who asked not to be named after having received threats, says that “literally on a monthly basis” they receive reports about domestic workers being sold into sex slavery upon arrival in Dubai.

    The government and recruitment agencies prefer not to upset the status quo, because they benefit from it economically, the activist says.


    ccCookie
    Participant

    do something about the prostitution and alcohol abuse which are so important to their tourist industry

    The notion that brothels are allowed or given free rein is incorrect. I’m not going to go out a find newspaper articles for you to verify that arrests are made, and deportations effected. You seem full able to find the newspaper articles yourself (if you wanted.)

    Interesting that your copy and paste claims the patrons of these activities are mainly “Westerners” whereas the link leads to an article claiming that they are mainly “Emiratis.”

    I currently have a friend visiting from Canada with his girlfriend and daughter. I guess he didn’t know that he was supposed to come here for prostitution. They visited the Burj Khalifa; I didn’t think to ask if they had to navigate past prostitutes.

    Most of the victims had been offered a respectable job as a receptionist in a hotel or as a secretary in the UAE while still in their home countries, she explains from her office at a shelter in an Abu Dhabi suburb. “They are often lured to the country by a friend or family member and don’t suspect anything.”

    This “friend or family member” is unlikely to be Emirati. They are expats, … behaving badly.

    Yes, there is prostitution in Dubai. To say that it might be a major component of the tourist industry is a stretch.

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