A Whisky thread

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Viewing 10 posts - 31 through 40 (of 40 total)

  • Tramor01
    Participant

    I always felt it was a bit of a “bling/flashy” whisky for the non-connoisseur, more of a whisky for “show” (more money than sense?) than for anything else (as to my earlier comment on it being liberally doused with Coca Cola). I think Chivas Regal had a somewhat similar reputation (at one time) being extremely popular with the Latin Market in the Americas

    As an alternative to single malts, can I suggest a single grain whisky in the form of Cameron Brig from the Cameronbridge Distillery in Leven?
    However,if you’re more into the Isaly or other Island Malts like Lagavulin or Talisker; as a Lowland whisky, Cameron Brig might be a bit too “light” for you as it’s slightly more akin to the Speyside malts.

    PS – You shouldn’t confuse Cameron Brig with (the flashy) Haig Club, which happens to come from the same distillery!!


    ontherunhome
    Participant

    This brings back a memory for me, back in the late 80’s. I was on an United 747 5th Freedom from Sydney to Auckland, about 4 hours flight and cost about A$100 return with a leg to Melbourne thrown in on the way back.
    This was the old days, full service in economy. For the first drinks round, I asked for a whisky, the steward asked if i’d like ice or coke, to which i replied”whisky should only be drunk with water or another whisky” at which point he gave me 3 minitures. Come dinner he then gave me 3 bottles of wine. Now this was a 4 hour flight, but we had a second snack meal before landing. Yes I had 3 cans of beer. I did not not drink it all, but put it into my bag for later.
    Note as an aside, my ticket had originally been booked for about $70 or $80 but apparently this was a mistake, so I had to pay extra at the airport or not fly. I know mistakes happen but usually this would not have caused an issue. I paid up and took my flight.
    On Board I spoke to the manager, who asked me to fill in a card to customer services. I filled this in, and also paid compliment to the attentive crew and great service. On disembarkation, He handed me a carrier bag with a bottle of first class champagne as a gesture of goodwill. I also got a nice letter from United and a cheque to cover the error. Those were the days.
    I then bought some whisky for my hosts in arrivals duty free, and poceeded to his home, for a catch up, handed him a recent Western Mail, and shared another very large glass of whisky. I slept well that night.
    This is when I bought New Zealand Whisky on my exit from the country.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Those were the days ….. some years ago I was on an SAA CPT LHR, in Y, and ordered a couple of bottles of wine from the onboard duty free, because it was a favourite that was not generally available. The steward came later to say unfortunately it was sold out. Just before we landed he handed me a pack of three superb wines from F delivered with a smile and a friendly handshake.
    Good old days indeed.


    wingcommander
    Participant

    Great thread. Not an aficionado myself my view is, you like what you like. The great variety of tastes created from water, barley and yeast using different barrels is testament to the success of uisge-beatha (water of life).

    So, just a couple of points to add; the Welsh Pendryn is certainly not a favourite and the helpful detailed description on stills has helped clarified the reason why I think. So thank you.

    My final point, in these extraordinary times is to draw contributors’ attention to a virtual tasting I am arranging with some friends to help pass time, catch up and enjoy a dram. I don’t want you to join me, but if you review http://www.whiskytoasts.com virtual tastings with a host walking you through whiskies by region or distillery can be arranged (samples posted to home address) and may (hopefully) enrich an otherwise isolated and dull evening in to an enjoyable evening with good friends … whisky and good friends, what could be better especially just now.


    Huitsix
    Participant

    Nice thread indeed!

    I’m pleasantly surprised to read that my tastes are quite aligned with most of yours: peaty, iodine tastes of Islay. I haven’t had the chance to taste the more expensive stuff but I really enjoy most Laphroaigs, Ardbergs & Lagavulins. In fact what I drink and enjoy the most is Laphroaig’s ‘Select’ which I think is the cheapest one they sell (or I am just too stingy?).

    Allow me to offer an anecdote: as all teenagers I suppose, I once got beyond drunk on cheap booze and couldn’t have a drop of it after. My culprit: Jim Beam (if you have never tasted it, just don’t). Fast forward about 15 years I have learned to drink whisky (with moderation) but still don’t really enjoy the stuff all that much until one day I find myself at my sister’s house, going through her liquor cabinet and finding a modest bottle of “quarter cask” Laphroaig. Seeing that the price tag was in British pounds and knowing that my sister had been to Scotland on more than 1 occasion I thought: this must be decent. From thay day onwards, I fell in love with its peaty taste literally *instantly*.

    The OP mentions Bruichladdich (sorry if I am not spelling it right) and I’m quite pissed off at Remy Cointreau’s policy to make it a super premium whisky. The Port Charlotte, the supposedly “most heavily peated whisky on earth” will NEVER justify its price tag to my eyes, cut the crap! I think it is 350 dollars at Changi Duty Free… I’ll pass!

    It’s just as pretentious as Cognac which I (unfortunately?) have also learned to love BTW. A glass of XO is something I always find hard to say no to!

    Before I forget: if any of you ever find yourselves looking for an exceptional whisky tasting experience in Singapore, I highly recommend “The Auld Alliance” I guarantee you will not be disappointed. Their whisky list goes beyond your imagination. They even have a hidden backroom where you can smoke cigars which doesn’t appeal to me (much rather smoke blunts which you don’t really want to do in Singapore) but pairs very well with fine whisky in the eyes of many I guess.

    Cheers all.


    K1ngston
    Participant

    Nice thread indeed!

    I’m pleasantly surprised to read that my tastes are quite aligned with most of yours: peaty, iodine tastes of Islay. I haven’t had the chance to taste the more expensive stuff but I really enjoy most Laphroaigs, Ardbergs & Lagavulins. In fact what I drink and enjoy the most is Laphroaig’s ‘Select’ which I think is the cheapest one they sell (or I am just too stingy?).

    Allow me to offer an anecdote: as all teenagers I suppose, I once got beyond drunk on cheap booze and couldn’t have a drop of it after. My culprit: Jim Beam (if you have never tasted it, just don’t). Fast forward about 15 years I have learned to drink whisky (with moderation) but still don’t really enjoy the stuff all that much until one day I find myself at my sister’s house, going through her liquor cabinet and finding a modest bottle of “quarter cask” Laphroaig. Seeing that the price tag was in British pounds and knowing that my sister had been to Scotland on more than 1 occasion I thought: this must be decent. From thay day onwards, I fell in love with its peaty taste literally *instantly*.

    The OP mentions Bruichladdich (sorry if I am not spelling it right) and I’m quite pissed off at Remy Cointreau’s policy to make it a super premium whisky. The Port Charlotte, the supposedly “most heavily peated whisky on earth” will NEVER justify its price tag to my eyes, cut the crap! I think it is 350 dollars at Changi Duty Free… I’ll pass!

    It’s just as pretentious as Cognac which I (unfortunately?) have also learned to love BTW. A glass of XO is something I always find hard to say no to!

    Before I forget: if any of you ever find yourselves looking for an exceptional whisky tasting experience in Singapore, I highly recommend “The Auld Alliance” I guarantee you will not be disappointed. Their whisky list goes beyond your imagination. They even have a hidden backroom where you can smoke cigars which doesn’t appeal to me (much rather smoke blunts which you don’t really want to do in Singapore) but pairs very well with fine whisky in the eyes of many I guess.

    Cheers all.

    I have not heard of this place Huitsix, where in Singapore, there used to be a place on Robertson Quay which was amazing and also had a cigar room, but would like to try the place you mention, we could also take Martyn there when he visits they will not have had such a good day 🙂


    Huitsix
    Participant

    Hi K1ngston,

    The Auld Alliance changed address a few years back I forgot where they used to be but now they are located at the 2nd floor of the Rendezvous Hotel on Bras Basah Road. The fact that it is not something you would run into by coincidence is part of what makes it great.

    I am sure you will not be disappointed. One thing I love about this place is that they also have a rather decent rhum collection which in Asia is quite hard to come by!

    However given the current situation in Singapore, it is not yet known when they will reopen.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    Five years ago to the day – it was the day of the vote on same sex marriage in Ireland – I was in Cork. That weekend I went on a tour of the distillery at Midleton, very interesting and typically Irish highly entertaining and a lovely day out.

    I tasted some excellent and enjoyable whiskeys (that is how the Irish like to see it spelled) and took a couple home, but none that had that tang of iodine and the sea, which is very much an acquired taste. For me one of the great pleasures of whisky/whiskey, in fact of any fine drink, is the memory of the time, the people, and the place where I bought it, which is why I rarely buy in supermarkets or bottle stores.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    K1ngston
    Participant

    Five years ago to the day – it was the day of the vote on same sex marriage in Ireland – I was in Cork. That weekend I went on a tour of the distillery at Midleton, very interesting and typically Irish highly entertaining and a lovely day out.

    I tasted some excellent and enjoyable whiskeys (that is how the Irish like to see it spelled) and took a couple home, but none that had that tang of iodine and the sea, which is very much an acquired taste. For me one of the great pleasures of whisky/whiskey, in fact of any fine drink, is the memory of the time, the people, and the place where I bought it, which is why I rarely buy in supermarkets or bottle stores.

    capetoniunm I fully agree its the whole ambiance and situation when enjoying or remembering a drink, I too love Midletons Whiskey and had it bought for me as a present so agree with you there, and that day 5 years ago in Ireland was they day I proposed to my husband ( unfortunately we were unable to marry in Ireland as we are not domiciled there) but the euphoria of the vote and its significance is very high for me …. On the night of our wedding in a bar in Sussex where we married we raised a glass of Midleton Rare, a very special day 🙂

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    Lovely story K1ngston, and I wish you both many more years of happiness together. After my dinner tonight I will raise a glass of something pretty drinkable to you both.

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