B737 MAX – Will You Fly on One ?

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Viewing 15 posts - 121 through 135 (of 137 total)

  • cwoodward
    Participant

    What year ?


    JohnnyG
    Participant

    Was the option of 2021 on the poll that was taken on here about 12 months ago , looking more like it !!!!


    cwoodward
    Participant

    Perhaps not:

    Boeing Engineer Claims Additional Design Flaws With 737 MAX

    This is not going to go away without being addressed despite all of the agencies involved running for cover and Boeing employing every dirty trick and slight of hand in the book to distort the testing information and to hide the myriad of technical and build quality issues dating back at least 6 years.

    This aircraft in its present configuration is very clearly uncertifiable.
    While the Boeing board of used car salesman types who presided over this fiasco most certainly are.


    transtraxman
    Participant

    “Boeing whistleblower alleges systemic problems with 737 MAX”. (Seattle Times 18 June 2020)

    https://www.seattletimes.com/business/boeing-aerospace/boeing-whistleblower-alleges-systemic-problems-with-737-max/

    This is the original source to which cwoodward refers.

    It is quite astounding that very few newslets have taken up on this subject as I would consider it of paramount importance. In fact I would go as far as to say that there might well be a desire to hush it up. For me it should be considered the death knell for the B737-800MAX project. The sooner it is buried the better.


    MarcusGB
    Participant

    No, I would and will not.

    I also have a friend who is an experienced Captain / Pilot, and licensed for the 737 series, he flies regularly.
    He has stated he will not fly the 737 Max series, as several of his colleagues will not either.
    They have formally refused.

    I have no doubt at all that the many of the orders will be withdrawn, given the current climate.


    TerryMcManus24
    Participant

    No


    JohnnyG
    Participant

    RELEASED yesterday by the FAA

    /1/2020

    FAA Statement on 737 MAX Certification Flights

    The FAA and Boeing today completed the certification flight tests on the Boeing 737 MAX. During three days of testing this week, FAA pilots and engineers evaluated Boeing’s proposed changes in connection with the automated flight control system on the aircraft. While completion of the flights is an important milestone, a number of key tasks remain, including evaluating the data gathered during these flights. The agency is following a deliberate process and will take the time it needs to thoroughly review Boeing’s work. We will lift the grounding order only after FAA safety experts are satisfied that the aircraft meets certification standards.

    The remaining tasks include:

    JOEB Validation & FSB Review – The FAA’s Flight Standardization Board (FSB) and the Joint Operations Evaluation Board (JOEB) which includes international partners from Canada, Europe, and Brazil will evaluate minimum pilot training requirements. The FSB will issue a draft report for public comment addressing the findings of the FSB and JOEB.
    Final FSB Report – The FAA will publish a final FSB report after reviewing and addressing public comments.
    Final Design Documentation and TAB Report – The FAA will review Boeing’s final design documentation in order to evaluate compliance with all FAA regulations. The multi-agency Technical Advisory Board (TAB) will also review the final Boeing submission and issue a final report prior to a final determination of compliance by the FAA.
    CANIC & AD – The FAA will issue a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) providing notice of pending significant safety actions and will publish an Airworthiness Directive (AD) that addresses the known issues for grounding. The AD will advise operators of required corrective actions before aircraft may re-enter commercial service.
    FAA Rescinds Grounding Order – This marks the official ungrounding of the aircraft, pending completion by operators of the work specified in the AD, along with any required training.
    Certificates of Airworthiness – The FAA will retain its authority to issue airworthiness certificates and export certificates for all new 737 MAX airplanes manufactured since the grounding. The FAA will perform in-person, individual reviews of these aircraft.
    Operator Training Programs – The FAA will review and approve training programs for all part 121 operators.


    ontherunhome
    Participant

    I still wont fly on one or use an airline that operates them.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    I still wont fly on one or use an airline that operates them.

    Nor me. Trust has been lost, not just because of the the deficiencies in the aircraft, but far worse than that, the web of lies and subterfuge that Boeing have put out.
    I would possibly consider flying on an airline that used the Max but I would want some type of confirmation that they would not put my backside onto a Max. As that undertaking is unlikely to be given, I suspect my answer remains a firm ‘no.’

    5 users thanked author for this post.

    Swissdiver
    Participant

    For all the reasons you give, I’d fly one with pleasure as it will be certified only after the FAA is 200% sure it is safe.


    JohnnyG
    Participant

    For all the reasons you give, I’d fly one with pleasure as it will be certified only after the FAA is 200% sure it is safe.

    If the FAA had 100% control over certification that would be fine as they would have to cover their own backs but if Boeing still had some control of it as before then I feel trust will be a long time coming.


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    after the initial blaze of publicity when back in service, will anyone actually notice they are on a max…?


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    Martyn, the sharklets are pretty distinctive, albeit they are being offered as a retrofit on earlier versions of the 737. If I was on my way to the aircraft and saw those sharklets, I would be looking for the aircraft model number on the fuselage, and if it said MAX or -8200, I would not board.

    I have, incidentally, walked off an aircraft before when I realised they had done an equipment switch on me, and demanded re-routing.


    ontherunhome
    Participant

    yes I would know. The B737 is not a pleasant aircraft at the best of times, compared to the A320 series. To add further woe to Boeing, I did read an item that suggests the 777X has the same issues or worse than the Max.


    GivingupBA
    Participant

    For all the reasons you give, I’d fly one with pleasure as it will be certified only after the FAA is 200% sure it is safe.

    Yes, Swissdiver, thanks, and I respect your comment. But surely the FAA has to be 200% sure any aircraft is safe? —- I suggest that they did not regarding the 737 MAX before the 2 deadly crashes killing 346 people.

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