B737 MAX – Will You Fly on One ?

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Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 120 total)

  • Tom Otley
    Keymaster

    Boeing to Temporarily Shut Down 737 Max Production https://nyti.ms/34kipNe


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    Boeing to Temporarily Shut Down 737 Max Production https://nyti.ms/34kipNe

    Which presumably means they don’t have sufficient confidence about getting FAA approval to continue manufacturing. Ouch.


    cwoodward
    Participant

    Shares down 5.3% overnight.

    Will it ever fly in its current configuration ? I have always believed not but have always hoped that I am wrong as that would be a heavy body blow from which Boeing may not recover.
    Friends in Aviation are telling me that there is agsain considerable talk among folks that know about these things re the possibility Boeing revamping and re-engining the 767.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Ryanair now saying it may not receive the MAX until October.


    cwoodward
    Participant

    The above is not the only ’new’ problem with the 737 max.
    The FIA are also reviewing a serious rotor shattering problem that they have discovered in the GE engines.


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    And in addition, from the NY Times:

    “Boeing also recently told the F.A.A. that it had discovered a manufacturing problem that left the plane’s engines vulnerable to a lightning strike.
    While assembling the Max, workers at Boeing’s Renton, Wash., factory had ground down the outer shell of a panel that sits atop the engine housing in an effort to ensure a better fit into the plane. In doing so, they inadvertently removed the coating that insulates the panel from a lightning strike, taking away a crucial protection for the fuel tank and fuel lines.”

    That’s extraordinary. The engines or housings don’t fit on the aircraft properly so workers just ground down the outer shell? Who authorised that, and why didn’t they realise it could be a problem??


    capetonianm
    Participant

    I hope that nobody will conflate this morning’s tragedy in THR with the 737MAX problems. It was an NG about 3 years old.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    Cedric_Statherby
    Participant

    That’s extraordinary. The engines or housings don’t fit on the aircraft properly so workers just ground down the outer shell? Who authorised that, and why didn’t they realise it could be a problem??

    The really worrying thing is that we do not know whether is is in fact that extraordinary. Maybe this is fairly standard practice at airline manufacturers? Maybe they take such shortcuts all the time?

    The airline industry cannot ever be 100% risk free – if the airline industry was completely committed to no casualties at all, ever, full stop it would simply declare that aim incompatible with flying and disband. In practice, all safety decisions are in effect trade-offs. This sounds like just one more such trade-off Boeing have made.

    Even in industries which routinely and robotically intone “the safety of our customers is our first priority” you know this isn’t really true: the bottom line is, and much of the task of management is to juggle the bottom line against the other objectives of the company. I suspect Boeing (a) knew what it was doing, (b) eyed the cost savings from doing so and (c) thought that the impairment to safety was either completely non-existent or at worst sufficiently minor to allow them to proceed.


    canucklad
    Participant

    I suspect Boeing (a) knew what it was doing, (b) eyed the cost savings from doing so and (c) thought that the impairment to safety was either completely non-existent or at worst sufficiently minor to allow them to proceed.

    And I suspect that this contributes to the continual friction between the NTSB and the FAA.
    It’s akin to the same animosity between traffic cops and other law enforcement
    When you witness and deal with the consequences of penny pinching you realize the long term futility of those decisions.
    One can only hope that Boeing’s recent repugnant decisions are a watershed in aviation safety and it reverts (the industry) back on course.


    canucklad
    Participant

    Quote of the day ……

    “This airplane is designed by clowns who in turn are supervised by monkeys”

    Boeing employee

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    I came on here to post exactly that quote.
    Canucklad beat me to it.

    Sadly it applies to far more than just the 737MAX.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Boeing staff warned they would not take their own families on a 737 Max jet and joked the planes were “designed by clowns and supervised by monkeys” before two fatal crashes, damning internal messages show.

    I briefly worked for an airline whose practices were so risky that I would not fly on them. I know how these Boeing people feel.


    JohnnyG
    Participant
Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 120 total)
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