Laptop and iPad ban

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This topic contains 65 replies, has 26 voices, and was last updated by  LuganoPirate 29 May 2017
at 11:06
.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 66 total)

  • flyman747
    Participant

    This won’t stop terrorists from detonating them remotely, or from flying via another country that doesn’t have these restrictions. The only 2 countries implementing it are America and the UK. We need to stop being bullied by America. It’s not security, it’s theatre. You can get things to harm someone or damage the aircraft after you’ve gone through security


    Dominic Ellis
    Participant

    Speaking on Dubai local radio today, Dubai Airports CEO Paul Griffiths said US-bound passengers can use their laptops up to the gate and then they will be taken to “secure stowage areas”, distinct from the rest of the bags, on Emirates’ A380s. Passengers will be given concierge-style tags to retrieve them from the secure boxes at the other end.
    I’m not sure how feasible it will be, and this weekend, with the directives coming into force, will be very busy with 1.1m passing through for the Spring break.
    Would this be enough to reassure you? Or would you be unwilling/unable to part with your laptop due to theft/loss/data protection concerns?


    Tom Otley
    Keymaster

    Thanks Dom,
    We’re just about to publish some details on this – very proactive of the airport and airline (Emirates) and will reassure business travellers both that they can work for a major part of the journey and in the airport, but also in terms of the security of those devices.
    Tom


    Gin&Tonic
    Participant

    I don’t understand how EK will recover every device at the gate? I don’t remember individual gate X-ray machines in DXB .


    Flightlevel
    Participant

    It doesn’t eleminate the risk of batteries igniting in an uncontrolled area, i.e. a box with other batteries in the hold?
    It might be better to remove batteries and hand carry them on board if they can be identified as not bomb material by the usual security technique, at the gate?


    Kass
    Participant

    As no doubt forum users will have seen, there are several bans being introduced today.

    Our initial story is here

    US to ban passengers from carrying on laptops from Europe, Middle East and Africa

    But it now seems the UK is also imposing a ban, details of which will follow.

    One area of concern (for me at least) is what the effect will be of having all these lithium batteries in checked luggage

    Lithium batteries: Fire power

    Easiest thing would be to leave all Electronics at home, especially as most travel INS does not cover them while in Hold


    Kass
    Participant

    I can only imagine the effect on bookings for big source markets of these airlines (India and China) with passengers intending to travel to and from there to the US with a transit at one of these airports.

    1. Passengers can’t work on the flight.
    2 They can’t work on the stopover
    3. The electronic item might be damaged
    4. It might be stolen
    5. Lots of companies won’t let a laptop travel in this way for security reasons.
    6. They have to trust no one has left their laptop on sleep mode which might then get damaged and overheat – in the middle of a bag surrounded by clothes.

    So I imagine travellers will immediately start looking for alternative routes and it will affect bookings – which will please the US airlines who have campaigned against the ME3.

    BUT …. least the passengers, crew etc will all be alive,.. which surely is a more important point.


    Kass
    Participant

    Passengers need to check whether a checked in laptop is covered on their travel policy.

    For some, it’s irrelevant, they cannot check in equipment because of data protection issues.

    I’m one of them.

    Have to leave it at home then …?


    Kass
    Participant

    These days governments can sell anything as long as they jam the word “security” in. I’m not buying it. Otherwise, France should be on the list (before UAE) as a country with most terrorist attacks in recent months.

    It’s done via intelligence… prob of a level way over yours and our heads. Maybe people should accept things for what they are, not try and make blame etc… what possibility woulda UK government have to gain from not allowing a laptop on board… really!!!!
    Maybe people need to realise that the government’s job is to keep the country safe, and have more than just you and your little Dell laptop to worry about… so people need to do it, lump it and shut up


    Kass
    Participant

    I am pieved, especially because I don’t buy the official reasons. After all, a laptop packed with explosives is as dangerous in the hold than in the cabin…

    This is moreover a very bad news for BA, unless other countries adopt similar routes… I guess I will need to fly more QR to maintain the Gold…

    It’s not just BA!


    Kass
    Participant

    More ridiculous guff from people who are just covering their ars.s.
    You have to check in a mini-iPad, but are allowed a Kindle or similar. If some idiot wants to bomb an aircraft they will do it. Remember years ago…no batteries and lots of drama at security. After a while it got a little inconvenient for government ministers so the rule was relaxed.
    One can only imagine that it is a Trumpism….
    As previously mentioned a bomb in the hold is worse than the cabin. At least in the cabin any associated fire can be dealt with and the problem is recognised.
    At least I shall be able to use my iPad on the Isle of Wight ferry….or will I??!!

    Kindles are not allowed actually..maybe Isle of Wight is safest place to go


    PeterCoultas
    Participant

    An even bigger farce than the liquids ban (just changed flights at SFO where my free BA wines went through without problem as did the toiletries). As a handbag only person I will now have to check a suitcase with the bottles and electronics rattling around inside – madness and, as several have pointed out, battery problems in the hold are worse than in the cabin. A typical pseudo-security con.


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    Whilst the on-board lap ban from 10 airports is unlikely to affect me, it is refreshing to read how some airlines (probably worried about the economic effects) are trying to provide solutions for their passengers.

    http://news.sky.com/story/turkish-airlines-finds-a-way-to-work-around-electronics-ban-10812957

    We have so far heard from 2 airlines with their solutions to this problem, I wonder how the affected British carriers will react and whether they will do more than send passengers back to check in staff if they find a forbidden item at the boarding gate.

    Turning to a recent mass postings by a newbie, (welcome)… there is one comment that did create thought… “have to leave it at home then” (17.55 on the 23 March 17), referring to a laptop……

    What I am wondering is – exactly what would it take for me not to travel with a lap top???

    Lap tops are very personal, we all like to use what we feel is best for us…a bit like choosing Apple, Android or Blackberry..

    But what would it take for me to travel without my fully loaded (with relevant programmes and documents) lap top?

    I would need two things….

    1. a cloud server (document storage) that was not based in the USA (where the Government as the right to access all cloud storage reserves…) that was fast where ever I was in the world

    2. access to computer hardware within easy reach… hotel rooms, airports and perhaps aeroplanes.. taxis etc, so I could access my documents and programmes

    I would love to travel without lap top and the plethora of wires and cables – but I could only do so, when I had confidence I could access my files easily , efficiently from where ever I am.

    I feel sure this will eventually happen, but for the moment, it hasn’t and I therefore need to continue to travel with my “IT suite of computers phones, back ups and cables”


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    Passengers need to check whether a checked in laptop is covered on their travel policy.

    For some, it’s irrelevant, they cannot check in equipment because of data protection issues.

    I’m one of them.

    Have to leave it at home then …?

    Wrong.

    Will just fly a different route.


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    Whilst the on-board lap ban from 10 airports is unlikely to affect me, it is refreshing to read how some airlines (probably worried about the economic effects) are trying to provide solutions for their passengers.

    http://news.sky.com/story/turkish-airlines-finds-a-way-to-work-around-electronics-ban-10812957

    We have so far heard from 2 airlines with their solutions to this problem, I wonder how the affected British carriers will react and whether they will do more than send passengers back to check in staff if they find a forbidden item at the boarding gate.

    Turning to a recent mass postings by a newbie, (welcome)… there is one comment that did create thought… “have to leave it at home then” (17.55 on the 23 March 17), referring to a laptop……

    What I am wondering is – exactly what would it take for me not to travel with a lap top???

    Lap tops are very personal, we all like to use what we feel is best for us…a bit like choosing Apple, Android or Blackberry..

    But what would it take for me to travel without my fully loaded (with relevant programmes and documents) lap top?

    I would need two things….

    1. a cloud server (document storage) that was not based in the USA (where the Government as the right to access all cloud storage reserves…) that was fast where ever I was in the world

    2. access to computer hardware within easy reach… hotel rooms, airports and perhaps aeroplanes.. taxis etc, so I could access my documents and programmes

    I would love to travel without lap top and the plethora of wires and cables – but I could only do so, when I had confidence I could access my files easily , efficiently from where ever I am.

    I feel sure this will eventually happen, but for the moment, it hasn’t and I therefore need to continue to travel with my “IT suite of computers phones, back ups and cables”

    I guess it comes down to two things….

    (1) security – can you keep your confidential files secure? Relying on the cloud for this is dodgy, IMHO. I am a great fan of and user of Dropbox for non-confidential files, but do not believe the risk/reward ratio of using the cloud for confidential files makes sense. If you were to carry encrypted media (e.g. a hard drive), you would have to be very sure that the machine you were using was also secure and not installed with some form of malware that captures your files – how would you do that? I have government clients who will not allow any data to be placed on the cloud – endof

    (2) programmes – if one simply needs an office type suite and a browser, this is easy enough. For those people who use more specialised software or virtual machines, it’s a non starter. I use Microsoft Office 2010 and 2016 and to get them to co-exist on the same machine is very very tricky, thus leading me to have a virtual machine setup, so seperate instances can exist.

    So, for some people, travelling without a laptop will be relatively simple, whilst for others it will be nigh on impossible.

    From a safety perspective, I don’t fancy travelling on an aircraft with a load of high capacity LioN batteries out of crew reach and if the airport security standards are so lax that bombs are a threat, I’ll change my working/travelling patterns (and I’ll use the UK advice to make this judgment, not the US, which does seem to have a component of paybackfor the ME3 airlines in it).

    Bye KSA.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 66 total)
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