What is the best travel advice you have ever been given?

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This topic contains 33 replies, has 25 voices, and was last updated by  canucklad 13 Sep 2016
at 09:53
.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 35 total)

  • Tom Otley
    Keymaster

    Following on from DavidGordon10’s

    What is the most useless piece of travel advice you have ever been given?

    I thought I’d add this thread.

    The best single piece of advice I’ve ever been given came at the end of an anecdote by a hotel manager, whose natural inclination was to sleep naked.

    Then one day in a strange hotel he woke up in the middle of the night having closed the toilet door behind him to find he was in the corridor.

    Luckily, because he’s a hotel manager, he knew where the laundry room was likely to be located, and having wrapped himself up with a sheet, went down to reception to ask for a replacement key. Of course once there he was asked “Do you have any identification?”

    So his advice, which I’ve always followed is, Don’t sleep naked in a hotel room.

     


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    When encountering disruption, get out of the disrupted area ASAP – even if it means heading in a less than optimal direction initially.


    seasonedtraveller
    Participant

    2 pieces for me…..
    Around 20 years ago – this;

    1 – “Buy a pair of noise cancelling headphones”

    2 – “Never be rude to those serving you” (aircraft, lounges, restaurants etc)


    peter19
    Participant

    Not sure it beats the naked story but reading an article a long time ago it was simply to take time to ensure you do at least one thing on every business trip to see the place your visiting. Even if its just making the effort to get out and walk around the place.


    MrMichael
    Participant

    If on an Italian or Greek ship, in an emergency follow the captain, you will be second in the boat!


    stevescoots
    Participant

    same for me, early advice was noise canceling headphones and be polite to staff, the later however I was taught from a very young age

    The other was if you have checked bags put $100 and a credit card in a sock and put in your shoe, you never know when you might lose your wallet. It happened one time. I landed in HCM with no wallet having decided to leave it on the counter in HKG. $100 was more than enough to get me a taxi to my hotel and the spare card allowed me to check in, then wait for my wallet to catch up with me via FedEx.


    JohnHarper
    Participant

    Keep your passport and wallet (and now phone) securely on your person at all times unless you are in the shower!

    ABBA.


    icenspice
    Participant

    Empty your pockets before using a hole-in-the-ground toilet.


    GivingupBA
    Participant

    [1] I’ve said it before – “Take double the money and half the clothes” (thanks, Mum. Best ever travel advice).
    [2] Reduce stress by checking in early. Me, I do that and then relax, watch the planes, have a nice snack… what’s the hurry?


    Tom Otley
    Keymaster

    (For family)
    If, when you’ve finished packing, you can’t pick up the bag, no one else can.


    icenspice
    Participant

    Do not fly 3-4-3 on a longhaul B777 flight. Ouch!


    esselle
    Participant

    When in a high risk city, always carry a wallet full of out of date credit cards. If you get attacked, hand it over.


    Ahmad
    Participant

    Once upon a time (not all that long ago) an article in Readers Digest advised to dress smartly for better service on planes. I took that to heart and since then, a suit and tie or a combination with tie and handkerchief has worked like a charm for me. Admittedly it is not as comfortable as travelling in casuals but the invariable better service in the air and better treatment on the ground is worth the slight discomfort. To test the theory, I have tried going casual on the same routes with the same carriers on several occasions. The service has always been ‘different’ and the treatment on the ground even more so, other than in USA where the difference has not been discernable.


    Tom Otley
    Keymaster

    Once upon a time (not all that long ago) an article in Readers Digest advised to dress smartly for better service on planes. I took that to heart and since then, a suit and tie or a combination with tie and handkerchief has worked like a charm for me. Admittedly it is not as comfortable as travelling in casuals but the invariable better service in the air and better treatment on the ground is worth the slight discomfort. To test the theory, I have tried going casual on the same routes with the same carriers on several occasions. The service has always been ‘different’ and the treatment on the ground even more so, other than in USA where the difference has not been discernable.

    Probably works when not travelling as well


    stevescoots
    Participant

    Esselle, that is actually excellent advise!

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