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This topic contains 89 replies, has 22 voices, and was last updated by  SergeantMajor 3 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #490357

    Anonymous
    #490358

    ArthurDimlock
    Participant

    I note that the TfL management have decided to be reasonable and thus the RMT and TSSA have suspended strike action planned for this week.

    http://www.rmt.org.uk/news/rmt-suspends-action-in-tube-jobs-and-cuts-dispute/?preview=true

    #490360

    SergeantMajor
    Participant

    The demand for interaction with staff in ticket offices is greatly reduced since the advent of oyster ticketing; most transactions can either be done at the machines, or online.

    From later this year, you’ll even be able to use your “wave and pay” credit or debit card at ticket gates which will further reduce the demand for ticket offices. Electronic information points work very well – and more staff will be available where you need them – on the station – to answer questions as a result of these proposed changes.

    Where personal interaction is justified, at London’s gateway tube stations, these manned ticket offices will remain.

    I don’t see why those of us capable of utilising lower cost option should subsidise those who are unwilling to use these new channels – it just doesn’t make economic sense to keep paying out nearly £20m per year when that would be better deployed improving infrastructure or delivering services where they are most needed.

    There are around 750 jobs at risk here – since the voluntary redundancy programme was announced, over 1000 have asked for quotes on what the voluntary package would mean for them, and 450 have formally applied to take advantage of the scheme. The vast majority of the remaining staff will be deployed on platforms and elsewhere in the station, where their presence will be more effective:

    http://londonfirst.co.uk/tube-staff-prefer-redundancy-to-fighting-ticket-office-closures/

    That almost 60% of the underground staff affected are actively opting in to the redundancy package demonstrates the fact that this strike was not about protecting jobs, but simply a thinly disguised opportunity for a Neanderthal Union to flex its limited political muscle. Compulsory redundancies are almost certain to be avoided once natural wastage (retirements/resignations) is taken into account.

    The Union’s case was not helped by this snap taken the night before the strike of a London Transport employee asleep in a ticket booth, with a sign requiring passengers to use the machines to get tickets:

    http://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/picture-of-tube-booth-worker-sleeping-on-the-job-at-paddington-emerges-as-strike-starts-9108252.html

    Nor was this action supported by Londoners, with 80% agreeing that the redeployment from ticket office to customer-facing positions made sense.

    This compared with the strike ballot itself, which had a typically low turnout amongst London Underground’s workforce – exposing the lack of democracy within the Union movement.

    In fact, once people had adapted to the strike closures, things moved considerable smoother on the second day of the strike; assisted by the availability of extra buses, Boris bikes and distance working. The threat of a tube strike does not have the economic impact it once did.

    To suggest this strike was of London Transport’s making is nonsense.

    #490361

    ArthurDimlock
    Participant

    If the strike had so little impact, why did Tfl negotiate this week?

    You’re having a larf sunbeam, they could have sat down last week and saved the public the grief.

    #490362

    superchris
    Participant

    Gents, this is a business travel forum. Im sure there are other more appropriate forums for this discussion……..

    #490363

    ArthurDimlock
    Participant

    Dont people use the underground for business travel?

    #490359

    DavidGordon10
    Participant

    Yes of course they do, and we had a thread a few weeks ago on the LHR bus station as well. I would hope that businesses would always use the most cost-effective means of transport.

    #490364

    ArthurDimlock
    Participant

    I saw that and it was interesting, in my job as a union rep I travel quite a bit and often use coach services, because they are cheaper than trains and comfortable too especially if you have a book to read.

    #490365

    DavidGordon10
    Participant

    So – let’s work to improve the LHR bus and coach station, and the underground facilities, for the benefit of business and leisure travellers alike, and for the benefit of the support staff on whom we depend.

    #490366

    ArthurDimlock
    Participant

    yes, thats a good idea. I don’t represent workers in this sector, but employers, workers and customers often have much more in common than people think, when I say what I do it is obvious some people think Im a trot, but most of my work is dealing with mundane, but important things like helping members with illnesses or recovering from accidents or representing them at discplinaries.

    #490367

    NIRscot
    Participant

    The “only 3% of passengers use a ticket office” translates to something like 100,000 people PER DAY. Not quite as straight forward as TfL made it sound.

    #490368

    BigDog.
    Participant

    NIRscot – 12/02/2014 01:15 GMT

    +1

    As is usual one selects the stat which suits ones case. It appears the figures for commuters and regular users (who are already carded up with discounted travel/season/oyster cards) have been conflated with the occasional user, visitors/businessmen to London, people transiting through and foreign tourists. It is this later group of very infrequent visitors who need the help as they are not familiar with the system; oyster cards; timings; all-zones; discount regs; routing etc.
    Yes the initiative may save money initially however alienating non-Londoners may cost the Capital more.

    #490369

    superchris
    Participant

    once again, what has this got to do with business travel??!! Can I start bemoaning petrol prices on here too?

    #490370

    GrahamSmith
    Member

    @superchris

    Tube strikes are not completely irrelevant and affect a lot of our readers/forum members. You’ve made clear your displeasure twice now, so there’s no need to do so again. Thanks.

    #490371

    ArthurDimlock
    Participant

    The cost of petrol could be important to some business travellers, I know I take the coach instead of my car, as we have to be seen to spend members funding wisely and public transport is cheaper than a mileage allowance.

    If there was to be a petrol/diesel delivery strike, it wold be directly relevant to business travellers and they would want to know if it was suspended, I’m certain.

    But plutocrats who think business travel is only done on jets, with lots of free booze and food might think differently, I suppose.

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