Qantas could be set for Sydney-London non-stop by end of year

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This topic contains 20 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  CathayLoyalist2 16 May 2019
at 14:49
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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)

  • JohnnyG
    Participant

    Not sure if I think if this is a good thing or not, a 21 hour flight, no thanks

    https://news.sky.com/story/qantas-could-be-set-for-sydney-london-non-stop-by-end-of-year-11707860

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    Henryp1
    Participant

    Sounds exciting depending on the cabin and overall space. AKL to DOH was fine, but an extra 4 hours might stretch it too much, but will be interesting to see the aircraft used.


    RedBaron
    Participant

    More Qantas smoke & mirrors/free publicity. There will be no such flights taking off until at earliest 2022 and even then it remains to be seen if such flights can be operated profitably.

    From News Ltd:

    But Mr Joyce said it would be ready to announce a new plane capable of the journey by the end of the year and have passengers off the ground for the world’s longest flight path in 2022.


    Geeman
    Participant

    Whilst it would save a few hours off the journey I would still rather do a 1 one stop journey – at least you can get off and stretch the legs and not feel encompassed for 22+ hours. My ideal transit/stop would be Dubai flying SYD/LHR and then SIN on a LHR/SYD flight. Get the longest leg out of the way first up.


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    Sadly, I do not travel down to Australia / New Zealand, but the opportunity of a 22 hour non stop flight, flying in first or business, either solo or as part of a group, is something that would excite me.

    The majority on here fly for business, I get that – but the world is opening up more and more and airlines need to sell travel concepts, to fill seats.

    Also not withstanding comments on other threads about alcoholic intake when flying – but the opportunity of food, booze, films, a bed, wifi (to keep in touch if you wish to), no washing up & no nagging partner asking what time you will be home – plus service with a smile – could be either the ultimate night out or a great way to get away from it all, for at least 22 hours.

    Some may think this is a bizarre way to get away – but combined with a few days in Australia, this could be the ultimate lads or gals get away opportunity…

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    GivingupBA
    Participant

    Whilst it would save a few hours off the journey I would still rather do a 1 one stop journey – at least you can get off and stretch the legs and not feel encompassed for 22+ hours. My ideal transit/stop would be Dubai flying SYD/LHR and then SIN on a LHR/SYD flight. Get the longest leg out of the way first up.

    Absolutely, me too. But I split such journeys halfway for a couple of days (e.g. in Hong Kong, or Singapore is fine too) and while many will say they cannot do that, that is how I organize my life; lucky me maybe. In any case 21-22 hours in one go is too much for me and I won’t do it now.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    As others have noted this development is years away.

    Neither is it really new.

    Qantas has already talked about what it calls “Project Sunrise” which would see the Australian carrier operating non-stop flights from Sydney/Melbourne to London and New York.

    Neither Airbus or Boeing have, currently, the right aircraft.

    Even if or when it is constructed there will be a long test period before it could enter commercial service.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/qantas-management/qantas-boss-alan-joyce-commits-to-three-more-years-at-helm-idUSL3N22D0UG

    Operating costs would be high for such a long flight. Expect only premium seating to be installed.

    Imagine

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    MarcusGB
    Participant

    Interesting in The Times a few days ago, of people now Flying on “Med/ Long Haul travel weekends”, with the Economy Lite cabin baggage only fares.
    This was featured in The Times and Telegraph, but sorry, no link as they only allow subscriptions to read.
    Using a night time to travel, is not something easily done within Europe, so using your night hrs if you can sleep could be productive.

    However, i used to live and work in Australia, and return at least twice a year, always with a stopover, even 2-3 days if i can. I also have flown from Auckland via Singapore to London, but prefer a stopover. I once flew Paris-SIN overnight, pre-booked a transit hotel within the airport, rested, slept, ate, had a half day in the city, and then took the Overnight flight to Auckland. This worked very well.
    Having just flown from Sydney via Taipei, and Amsterdam with China Airlines (superb A350 new suites in BC), i found that very tiring.
    I certainly would not choose the direct flight from Perth to London now, let alone a flight from Sydney.
    Completely agree, with the concept, let alone the physical benefit and medical safety, of landing and being able to walk around have time and space.
    Flying does have such a great impact on our bodies and minds, that we often forget, or find ways to “Fight Jetlag” rationalising that it isn’t really so good for us!

    Qantas jam pack the 787 in with 4 classes, and it is not that large an aircraft for people to walk, move or i think be comfortable on for such long flights.
    We often have a love for the 747’s now phasing out, but there were elements of space on these for everyone to move around, and if lucky enough to climb the stairs, quite a different experience. I also find the A380’s comfortable for 15 hr flights ME to Sydney, but they will become less available now productions have ceased.

    Just to save on a 2 hrs connection, missing an opportunity to stopover and experience another country, culture and enrich our travel time and rest…Not for me thanks!
    Is this not more about profit for the Airlines, than comfort, experience, and convenience for the passengers?

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    Brett
    Participant

    Used to fly to NZ for the weekend to watch a rugby test match. A sad reflection on the stress of a busy professional life but the long flight was complete “me time”, eat, drink, sleep, watch films and no clients, emails or phones! With the kiwis being so positive, I would always return refreshed and ready to take on the world. However, the half way break to shower and freshen up was invaluable.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    EU_Flyer
    Participant

    Operating costs would be high for such a long flight. Expect only premium seating to be installed.
    Imagine

    Very true indeed!

    I wonder if QF would make these non-stop flights First / Business and Premium Economy with a very small Economy cabin sold at a premium and rely on the 1 stop A380 and non stop PER LON flights for non premium leisure customers who may not be in such a rush and/or willing to pay the premium?

    A problem with that strategy however is that if the global economy contracts / demand falls – high yielding corporate demand will also drop, and so will fares but not necessarily costs. Qantas will be left with planes it can’t operate profitably. Same goes if oil prices rise. BA had that problem with its high density business class 744s after the 2008 crisis, as did many other full service airlines.

    Further, what happens if there is, say, a 4 hour delay at the airport? Will the waiting operating crew be able to safely fly the aircraft (even with their allocated breaks) for 25 hours straight? If so, will it lead to cancellations and therefore disappointment? Could it be dangerous?

    Australia to Europe and vv is a relatively small market and I wonder if there will be enough demand to maintain such a service profitably. Happy to proven wrong though!

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    GivingupBA
    Participant

    ……..A sad reflection on the stress of a busy professional life but the long flight was complete “me time”, eat, drink, sleep, watch films and no clients, emails or phones!………

    I definitely agree. When I get on a 12-hour nonstop flight (luckily in J class) my first thought is – “Great, no interruptions are possible for 12 hours now, I’m out of the loop, now for some serious me time.” I then spend 12 happy hours relaxing, eating, watching movies, dozing, daydreaming, sleeping. (I know I can and should do that at home too, but the temptation to connect up is too great… I’m too weak to ignore that!)

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Further, what happens if there is, say, a 4 hour delay at the airport? Will the waiting operating crew be able to safely fly the aircraft (even with their allocated breaks) for 25 hours straight?

    That’s a good point.

    There has been at least two incidents involving major delays departing Perth.

    https://thewest.com.au/news/aviation/passengers-fume-as-qantas-perth-to-london-flight-qf9-cancelled-ng-b881077589z

    Then there was another incident last year. When the London-bound aircraft returned to Perth the crew were out of hours and so the flight had to be cancelled.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-09/qantas-plane-returns-to-perth-with-disruptive-passenger/10219044

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    EU_Flyer
    Participant

    hat’s a good point.
    There has been at least two incidents involving major delays departing Perth.

    Interesting! Perhaps I’m old fashioned but I wonder if these ultra long haul flights are really necessary and actually safe. True, there are checks and balances and back up crews ect on board, but part of me thinks this is flying for longer for the sake of flying for longer. I guess the loads have been good with QF and other airlines operating similar. But will this last? Will it take an accident to highlight the fact that we’re not really meant to fly for over 15 hours straight, let alone 21+!

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    AJDC
    Participant

    That’s because Martyn, you have never done it before. It soon loses it’s gloss. It is not as much fun as you seem to think. Because whether or not you are in first or business you are still trapped in a metal tube for almost an entire day.


    SimonS1
    Participant

    21 hours non stop on a plane? I can’t think of anything less interesting. Great for the first 3/4 hours until the novelty wears off.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
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