British nationals set to pay €7 to enter Europe’s Schengen Area

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 53 total)

  • cwoodward
    Participant

    Did they ever ?
    Both my wife (Canadian) and one sons (NZ) use non British passports and nether has ever been stamped in Europe.


    DerekVH
    Participant

    Currently British Passport holders get a stamp but you are correct, pre Brexit we did not.


    CathayLoyalist2
    Participant

    Just out of interest I read that 18-70 year olds will have to register for ETIAS. Does that mean that 70+ year olds are exempt or am I missing something here?

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    BPP
    Participant

    [postquote quote=1341638]

    It means exactly that for which as a +70 I am very thankfull.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    Jacob
    Participant

    I think we still would have to register but do not have to pay anything.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    BPP

    CathayLoyalist2
    Participant

    I read that the UK is going to introduce it´s own ESTA/ETIAS in 2024 on the basis of protecting borders. No menion of cost yet

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    FormerBA
    Participant

    7 Euro to stand in a long line behind all the other 3 country nationals. Brexit the gift that keeps on giving.

    4 users thanked author for this post.

    openfly
    Participant

    Why are we not charging the rest of Europe €8 for the pleasure of coming to our country?? Why are we allowing the rest of Europe to use the quick passport check, while we have to queue behind them. Nah, make them have a passport stamp, like they make us do??!!

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    Chris in Makati
    Participant

    [postquote quote=1342001]

    Manual passport checks and stamping passports individually costs money. The more we’re able to process passengers through automated gates the less burden there is on the taxpayer. I’m sure EU countries understand this too, which is why they’re planning to enhance their systems to do the same when their EES system is up and running.


    Eric
    Participant

    [postquote quote=1342015]

    We voted to be a third country so we can’t be surprised when we’re treated as one. You will recall that predictions of these events that have largely come true were called Project Fear by the grifters.

    5 users thanked author for this post.

    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    [quote quote=1342027]We voted to be a third country so we can’t be surprised when we’re treated as one.[/quote]

    Personally I have no issue being treated as a “third country”. I have endured immigration queues at borders for most of my professional career.

    The issue I have, is the same countries that treat us Brits as aliens from outer space, stamp our passports EXPECT to be afforded fast track, visa free and zero cost entry into the UK. I hear from colleagues that it is now quicker to enter the USA than crossing the border at a busy European hub airport.

    If we are truly in control of our border (which I doubt we are) then EU members should be afforded the same courtesies when entering the UK as they afford us when entering into the EU… Oh of course the Brexit agreement.

    Efficient border movements greatly assist my business travel (and pleasure travel)….

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    Chris in Makati
    Participant

    [postquote quote=1342051]

    The inference there is that stamping of passports is something done to deliberately inconvenience travellers, possibly as some kind of punishment or revenge. I don’t believe this is the case at all. As I said previously, manual processing of passports is expensive as it requires the use of staff and the delays cause more congestion in airports. Doing that unnecessarily is in nobody’s interest. Most countries are working to find ways to get passengers through airports as fast as possible by introducing automation as much as possible.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    RoyJones
    Participant

    Probably as a result of COVID, entry into the USA has become much more efficient, automatic for Global Entry and for repeat (within 3 years) ESTA travellers. US Customs has also changed to the “European” style of knowing which bags should be checked plus some random checks.

    Hopefully the ETIAS will allow automatic barriers instead of manual checks, although personally [with a UK passport] I have never had to wait more than 5 minutes at any European port of entry. I am over 70 and I believe we will still have to apply for ETIAS but at no cost. Incidentally ETIAS is for Schengen area entry/exit, although EU nationals (Schengen or not) won’t need one.

    A UK equivalent is needed in any case – too many passports can be forged and I believe an ESTA/ETIAS system with computer comparison of fingerprints and/or face will reduce some sophisticated illegal entry. Yes, it is an inconvenience to have to submit documentation for such a permit but most of us can do it on the internet.

    On another note restricted entry at St Pancras limits the daily throughput and its the owners (French Government and Canadian Pension Funds) that are losing revenue. Perhaps there needs to be some joined up thinking on that, not that the UK government is in a position to advise on that!!!

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    jwak_hkg
    Participant

    You were probably unaware of the fact that you guys put us (Australians) in the queues for years whilst you used e-gates to enter Australia…

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    While all UK and EU nationals need an ESTA to visit the USA, I’m not sure (and please correct me if I’m wrong) the Americans can travel to the UK and EU freely. I think that the UK should also charge EU visitors to come to the UK as well as Americans.

    Having said that, Brexit, whether you agree or not, voted or not, is a reality, and EUR 7 (I bet they increase it within 2 years) for 2 years is not really a lot of money, and I can understand them wanting to control their borders, unlike the UK. Notwithstanding the 100’s of 1000’s that seem to anyway enter illegally!

    And what of the Irish. They are part of the EU, but not of Schengen, what will be the rules for them?

    I think the biggest gripe is the fact people can only stay for 90 days every 180 days. This seriously impacts people who wish to spend the winter months in Spain or Portugal etc. However it is possible to apply for a “D Visa” which is valid I believe for 5 years and allows multiple entries and longer than 90 day stays. This can also be used for investments into a business and for many other reasons.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 53 total)
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