BA Staff Attitude Survey Results

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Flightlevel 16 Jun 2018
at 12:21
.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

  • FDOS_UK
    Participant

    This is worth a look, I wonder if it will be taken down?

    https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/british-airways-executive-club/1914079-results-ba-staff-survey.html

    I’d say the data is pretty credible and aligns with my experience of using BA regularly.

    What do others think?

    Edited to add that column 2 only totals 98%, I wonder what the missing 2% was?


    CathayLoyalist2
    Participant

    There is little in that for senior management to feel pleased about and it points a challenging finger at the culture of the company. I am sure their are managers who do try for their people and succeed in spite of lack lustre senior management. The what do we need to work on section should have red flags waving furiously. It would be more revealing if we knew what the figures were from previous surveys


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    It would be more revealing if we knew what the figures were from previous surveys

    Yes, you’re right.


    canucklad
    Participant

    My mate’s a manager with a well known high street bookmakers……
    They also had atrocious results from an internal employee satisfaction survey.

    Very simple — his top management took a very pragmatic approach to the results.
    Assume that the employees didn’t understand the questions and resubmit the survey, with the further instruction that all frontline managers had to do a training session to support their employees on how to answer the survey questions correctly.

    2 months later, the revised survey showed a far happier and contented workforce.

    Simple when you know how….


    Flightlevel
    Participant

    Probably an MBA course somewhere that says unhappy employees work harder to keep their jobs.
    Not true ofcourse – they just take their grudges out on customers and management with results that small problems cause bigger problems!


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    My mate’s a manager with a well known high street bookmakers……

    They also had atrocious results from an internal employee satisfaction survey.

    Very simple — his top management took a very pragmatic approach to the results.

    Assume that the employees didn’t understand the questions and resubmit the survey, with the further instruction that all frontline managers had to do a training session to support their employees on how to answer the survey questions correctly.

    2 months later, the revised survey showed a far happier and contented workforce.

    Simple when you know how….

    Standard evil hr management practice, Cancucklad.


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    interesting, but,

    54% are proud to work for BA
    40% would recommend working there
    20% (including other) are satisfied, happy etc.
    Yet 82% want to carry on working there???

    Seems a bit of a disconnect to me.


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    interesting, but,

    54% are proud to work for BA

    40% would recommend working there

    20% (including other) are satisfied, happy etc.

    Yet 82% want to carry on working there???

    Seems a bit of a disconnect to me.

    Having designed, validated by interviewing a sample of respondees and interpreted a few of these type of things in the past, I’d say not necessarily so.

    Part of the 82% might believe that they are on a better deal that they can get elsewhere or alternate employment is scarce, not all of them like working there, would recommend it or are proud to work for the company.


    canucklad
    Participant

    Like all surveys it’s how you originally set yourself for success…..

    Well worth another watch……


    handbag
    Participant

    Lugano Pirate. Disconnemct

    Part of the reason for this is a lot of jobs within airlines are seniority based. Therefore up until Mixed Fleet started , if you worked up to CSD then left for one day or one year and then came back to work for BA as Cabin Crew you would start at the bottom as Main Crew , regardless of having 5, 10 or 39 years experience. The other factor could be that although many are not happy with the Company, they are now at an age, that starting from the bottom in another career is financially not an option.

    Since Mixed Fleet started, they are taking on experience in higher positions, but for a worse contract and less pay than WW Crew.

    As far as I am aware the same applies to Pilots. Just be cause you were a Captain elsewhere, you won’t be when you join BA. I believe other airlines work on same principal.

    It is quite unusual situation. In most Companies people move to go up the ladder. You wouldn’t be the office manager and then if you were to rejoin or go to a similar Company be the office Junior.


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    handbag

    As far as I am aware the same applies to Pilots. Just be cause you were a Captain elsewhere, you won’t be when you join BA. I believe other airlines work on same principal.

    I think there is also a supply/demand element to this and sometimes they take direct entry captains, but not always.

    https://careers.ba.com/job/london/ba-cityflyer-direct-entry-captain/22348/7987694

    The above is for Cityflyer, BTW and is currently advertised.

    In general though, I think you make a good point – seniority is a ‘lock in’ and just because a worker needs the money is no guarantee of happiness or motivation – I love all the HR theories that say people work for interest, responsibility etc., but in my working life I’ve seen many more who work to fund their lifestyle, which is usually nothing extraordinary and can be a real grind in recent times with high rents/mortgage payments. Add in less than stellar management and the outcome is ugly (and I’m not just thinking of BA, either).

    So yes, you can have people who want to stay in their current role, but are neither particularly happy nor motivated. If that person in the front line and getting a lot of stick from their customers due to dissatisfaction with the service or product, then they may not be proud to work for the employer, either, as they agree with the customers (again I am not specifically commenting on BA).

    Thus, the apparent disconnect may be explainable and I’ve seen similar at other large organisations, healthcare is such a sector where I’ve had some odd survey outcomes from a poll of over 1,100 employees.


    Flightlevel
    Participant

    Seniority is required to keep professional staff within the system – and most major airlines have safe operations so they want to keep their system (or SOPs) working.
    Once next to pilot on his routine bi-monthly trip home who had previously emigrated with his family and continued in his original airline because starting at the beginning in the new location, would be financially impossible.
    In less professional work having atleast two annual family holidays in exotic locations on business class is an incentive!

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