BA bumping passengers?

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This topic contains 15 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  AlanOrton1 28 Apr 2017
at 22:00
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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)

  • penfold69
    Participant

    Just read a story in the Travel Weekly about BA offloading 2 disruptive passengers (disruptive as they wanted an upgrade) on their way from LGW/KIN. Not only did they offload them, they offloaded them in the Azores. A quick Google shows the Suns headline that one of them was a 65 year old cancer patient. I don’t read that garbage, so will wait until more facts come out and a more reputable news company reports on it. Not a great place to be offloaded though. Can’t imagine they will find it easy getting home from there. Anyone else know of any other random places people have been offloaded?


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    FaroFlyer
    Participant

    Penfold69

    Airlines offloading, bumping passengers, and having dying bunnies, are the news fashion, for now.

    Assuming the stories are correct then BA were absolutely right to do so. I don’t see any problem with offloading disruptive passengers anywhere convenient to the airline.

    You may remember one of the first, well publicised, air rage incidents on a BA flight from LGW to MCO. The passenger became abusive, and was restrained in flight and was offloaded, and arrested, at BOS. Coincidentally I had interviewed him for a job as sales manager a few weeks before, and he turned me down. We spoke about 5 years later and we chatted about it, and he believed that BA were totally correct in what they had done. He had apologised to BA and was again allowed to fly on BA.


    Flightlevel
    Participant

    Not positive to offload pax, causing delay, maybe increased fuel to arrive on schedule and publicity, however necessary sometimes, awhile ago pax said was ill and requested upgrade (joke!) offloaded and told to seek medical advice, probably lost their ticket too!


    GivingupBA
    Participant

    I saw a very disruptive [drunk] passenger offloaded [hustled down the aircraft steps by crew] from a BA VC-10 stopping at Damascus in the 1970s – I was getting on the flight. He had been in a row near where I sat and the passengers around that row said it was a good thing he was offloaded. He was scheduled to fly on to Heathrow so I guess he didn’t have a visa for Syria.


    Edski777
    Participant

    In the wake of the United row: there is a distinct difference between someone being off loaded for disruptive behavior, like the BA examples in this thread, and the forced off loading because of the overbooking of a flight by the airline.
    In the first case the passenger is to blame and no sane individual would object. In the case of overbooking by an airline, at least in my opinion, there would be a breach of contract. No matter what’s in the small print!


    Cloud-9
    Participant

    It appears – according to the Telegraph – that the passenger and partner decided they should be allowed to sit in J as there was inadequate legroom in Y.

    The most telling bit of the story is that said passenger and partner decided to record the entire incident themselves.

    Jumping on the Dao bandwagon?


    capetonianm
    Participant

    “It appears – according to the Telegraph – that the passenger and partner decided they should be allowed to sit in J as there was inadequate legroom in Y.”

    Morons. Perhaps people should be asked to do an intelligence test before they’re allowed to fly.

    Clearly they hadn’t read this article : http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/advice/how-to-get-a-free-airline-upgrade/


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    In the wake of the United row: there is a distinct difference between someone being off loaded for disruptive behavior, like the BA examples in this thread, and the forced off loading because of the overbooking of a flight by the airline.
    In the first case the passenger is to blame and no sane individual would object. In the case of overbooking by an airline, at least in my opinion, there would be a breach of contract. No matter what’s in the small print!

    Given that the passengers were already boarded on the United flight and the 4 extra boarders were crew, who were apparently were a last minute addition, I am not sure this would be classed as overbooking.

    Not being a lawyer, I’ll leave it there.


    esselle
    Participant

    If they were booked and travelling in Y and decided to make a fuss about being moved up when already in flight, one can only imagine that they must have been being VERY disruptive for the captain to decide a divert and unscheduled landing was necessary.

    On that basis, I’m not sure I see a link between this and the UA story.


    Ekond222
    Participant

    …Maybe one of the passengers was a Dr…and the other one was a rabbit…otherwise I don’t see the connection either…


    penfold69
    Participant

    I didn’t mention any connection, and agree there isn’t one. I would love to see the video they supposedly took of the incident though! If anyone comes across it, please share.


    penfold69
    Participant

    Thanks DerekVH. Doesn’t show much unfortunately. Interesting to note they won’t let a restrained passenger use the toilet. Not sure if that is normal in those situations, but I would not be happy if I had to sit near someone who had to go to the toilet at their seat.


    Cloud-9
    Participant

    He’s not really dressed to be upgraded, is he?

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