A321LR makes first transatantic test flight today

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  AMcWhirter 15 Feb 2018
at 16:11
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  • AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Airbus’ A321LR is set to change the way we fly across the Atlantic as our various articles have already explained.

    Its first test flight, linking Paris with New York (JFK), is currently en route.

    IAG and Norwegian have already ordered a number of A321LRs.

    IAG has said its A321LRs will enter service with Aer Lingus for transatlantic operations.

    In a press conference today, Norwegian’s CEO said he plans to use A321LRs on transatlantic routes. In addition the airline says it is considering using the long-range A321 to the Middle East.

    Norwegian expands and targets business travellers


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    Airbus’ A321LR is set to change the way we fly across the Atlantic as our various articles have already explained.
    Its first test flight, linking Paris with New York (JFK), is currently en route.
    IAG and Norwegian have already ordered a number of A321LRs.
    IAG has said its A321LRs will enter service with Aer Lingus for transatlantic operations.
    In a press conference today, Norwegian’s CEO said he plans to use A321LRs on transatlantic routes. In addition the airline says it is considering using the long-range A321 to the Middle East.

    I hate to be picky, but that is a picture of a Boeing 787.


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    FDOS – I take your point. But I was actually referring to the entire article which Tom wrote earlier today and before the news emerged of the A321LR test flight ex-Paris.


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    Well, it’s still a 787 underneath a stroy about an Airbus, so here is the right picture

    Airbus A321


    Flightlevel
    Participant

    A321LR has superceded the so-called B797 to the Atlantic (and Hawaiian) routes and will the latter aircraft catch up?
    Its 2 aisle cabin and base on the B787 may make a difference eventually to comfort and Business class.
    For now Welsh wings do the work!


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    French all-business class airline La Compagnie will be operating transatlantic services with two A321LRs.

    La Compagnie to offer fully flat seats on new A321 neos


    Tom Otley
    Keymaster

    A321LR has superceded the so-called B797 to the Atlantic (and Hawaiian) routes and will the latter aircraft catch up? Its 2 aisle cabin and base on the B787 may make a difference eventually to comfort and Business class. For now Welsh wings do the work!

    There was an interesting piece in Bloomberg yesterday about the B797

    Delta’s Boss Wants to Be a Launch Customer on Boeing’s ‘797’ Jet

    The company is targeting the market gap between the largest narrow-body and smallest wide-body aircraft. One would seat 225 travelers and fly about 5,000 nautical miles — from the midwestern U.S. to Europe, for example. A larger sibling would seat 275 and cruise about 4,500 nautical miles.


    Gold-2K
    Participant

    Isn’t this aircraft just doing what the 757 used to do with the American carriers, albeit probably more efficiently?

    Hardly “changing the way we fly across the Atlantic”


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Gold-2K – I have been writing about these aircraft types (B737 and A320/1) operating long-haul routes for the past couple of years.

    Please refer to our last feature “Narrow Margins” in the March 2017 issue of Business Traveller.

    Long-haul travel: Narrow margins

    What the A321LR (and the B737MAX8 to a more limited extent) will do is to operate transatlantic flights without en route fuel stops from time to time which was a feature of B757 operations – see link below.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/transatlantic-flights-forced-by-wind-to-land-for-fuel-1.1205359

    But more importantly they will be operated by more airlines (both conventional and low-cost carriers) rather than the previous few B757 operators.

    It means more routings from all over Europe to the US East Coast. And some of these routings will open up secondary destinations to non-stop air service.

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