MAB CEO stepping down early?

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This topic contains 20 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  Schaible 22 Apr 2016
at 07:14
.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)

  • Anonymous

    Mazin26
    Participant

    Interesting to read that Malaysia Airlines new CEO is stepping down from his position after the airline just posted their first ever profit in a long time. He is still halfway through his tenure. Wonder what’s the story behind that? Any ideas?


    TheRealBabushka
    Participant

    You’ve been following the 1MDB case?

    I don’t think its far fetched to believe Malaysia PLC is well and truly ****ed.

    I’m not surprised if Herr Mueller has been frustrated along the way and has chosen to preserve his sanity by leaving.


    Jomtien9
    Participant

    Trying to run a profitable business in a country where religious interfering is becoming the norm would stretch any-one’s sanity.


    Mazin26
    Participant

    I am Malaysian so I well aware of the 1MDB and other stuff going on there. But sticking to normal corporate situations, what could push a man who just made profit for a loss making company to leave his position?


    SimonS1
    Participant

    These situations often result from political interference and it wouldn’t surprise me here.

    Sorry to say if the Malaysian govt people demonstrate the same people skills as they did post MH370 (advising relatives by SMS their families were presumed dead and then throwing them out of a press conference) then it can’t be an easy job.


    StephenLondon
    Participant

    My guess would be along the same lines as SimonS1, too much political interference.

    Take, for example, the idiotic cessation of alcohol service on flights sub-3 hours in economy and business class. It caters for the one extremist to was calling for a total ban, and little for the international customer using KLIA as a hub who is actually paying the fare.

    It is hard watching a once great carrier, that always had a decent reputation for quality and service, slide towards the abyss. PanAm sure springs to mind!


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Former COO Peter Bellew has been appointed executive director.

    MH will now be searching for a new CEO.


    sparkyflier
    Participant

    + 1 SimonS and StephenLondon

    I have always been keen to try Malaysian, and have looked at them for potential trips to Asia – KL, CGK, SIN etc, but this decision to ban alcohol is in my opinion ridiculous.

    They had been a basket case of a business, started to turn around, and then are taking backward step. I am not a heavy drinker, but with their decision, I can see how Mr Mueller could have felt others were making his job to turnaround the airline even more challenging.

    I will be very unlikely to choose them going forward – in that region there is no shortage of choice..


    Charles-P
    Participant

    Malaysia’s 1957 ‘racial bargain’ has begun to unravel.

    In 1948, the British agreed to transfer political power to the Malayan Federation where a ‘racial bargain’ had been struck among the three major ethnic groups – Malays, Chinese and Indians – but with the native Malays predominating.

    The country’s ‘Islam with a smiling face’ has become more ideological with Wahhabi-Salafism making deep inroads despite the dominance of the moderate Shafie-school of jurisprudence. Political Islam in Malaysia is ‘state-sponsored’, mainly by the ruling party, and hence, not anti-establishment.

    In Malaysia Muslims only constitute 60 per cent of the population but they are very vocal in their demands, the banning of alcohol for all Malaysians being one of them. Islamist political interference in all walks of life is growing and I doubt very much a Christian German was going to last long at the helm of MA.


    MrMichael
    Participant

    I personally very rarely consume alcohol on flights, although when travelling for leisure purposes MrsM enjoys a glass of or two of Claret. I am of the opinion that for many people alcohol is a very important part of their life whether it be down the pub, a glass or two at home or when travelling. Personally I am not a big drinker and often go weeks without a drop. But given it is an important element then any Airline choosing to be dry is going to have a harder job in attracting custom. Look at the likes of Saudi and Egyptair, for most business travellers they do not jump out as an attractive option. Given the recent problems MAB have experienced this seems a nutcase decision and the CX walking is no surprise. Seems to me getting on a MAB flight given the loss of two hulls and subsequent loss of life people still need persuading to make MAB a choice. I regret for MAB this is going to be the start of a downhill journey to the history books.


    RegSpotter
    Participant

    Christoph was up against it from day one. An airline that is a basket case after years of Government interference, overstaffed and having been killed by the ME3 on many of its once profitable long haul routes . On top Air Asia is sucking up the regional business. To then have rules imposed such as the alcohol ban must have limited his options for creativity for a new brand proposition.


    Dandan27
    Participant

    Why MAB? Did we call BA BAP before it was consumed by IAG, or UA UCH? Seems odd and appears to misunderstand what Berhad means.


    TheRealBabushka
    Participant

    Dandan27,

    I think it is to distinguish between the private (MAS) company and the nationalised (MAB) company.

    Rumour has it, Mueller wasn’t given as free a hand as he would like. Makes you wonder why any expat would want to take this job (or any job for that matter). For all intent and purposes MAB is a government entity (patron) with a large constituent (client) base to mollify. Truth is the government will continue to fund MAB. Service and product development will continue to be inconsistent, haphazard and prioritised on the whims of the few. So we can continue to expect cheap fares. Just don’t expect your loved ones to be well taken care off if your plane disappears.


    Cornwall
    Participant

    You have forgot another thing, theft at the very highest levels in this airline was endemic in the 1990’s.This was the start of the decline in this once really top international airline.
    The only assets left were the ones that could not be made simply vanish, was their great fight crews, both technical and cabin crew. In particular the wonderful cabin crew. It is the Malaysian Government that is the responsible party for all of this both past and present! just look at what is going on at the moment with their P.M. NO THERE IS A LOT MORE THAN ALCOHOL about the goings on in K.L.

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