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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,848 total)

  • capetonianm
    Participant

    I have always boycotted Ryanair. I don’t know enough about all sides of this incident to comment on whether it would give me cause to boycott them, but it’s irrelevant. That said, the male pax behaviour was out of order and I hope he is dealt with appropriately.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    I also make sure that I leave a room clean and reasonably tidy. I make sure that any litter is in the bin, cushions and so on returned to their correct places, used cups and glasses on the tray, and I leave the bathroom and toilet as clean as I would my own at home.

    I remember once going into a female ex-colleague’s room when we checked out (to help her with her luggage!) and I was utterly disgusted with the way she’d left her room, and I lost the little professional respect I’d had for her before this happened. This was in a 5 star hotel, not some back-packers’ dosshouse.

    Stevescoots makes a very valid point too, it does help in ensuring nothing is left behind.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    I am afraid EZY are far from having it sussed. At some airports they usually do as Globetrotter says, and it works well. At some of the outstations it’s down to the policy of the handling agents who usually go for the cheapest solution which is to embark the priority boarding pax first, if they can make it through the scrum of ignorant and selfish people who crowd round, blocking the access. Everyone ends up on the same bus and then all the doors are opened at once, creating another scrum to board the aircraft.

    I have seen people move from one roped off compartment on the bus to another, in order to get off first.

    What then happens is the same selfish oafs (oaves?) who muscled their way on first stow their cabin bags at the front, denying use of the overhead bins to people who have paid extra for those seats, and move down to take their seats at the back of the aircraft. This creates havoc on embarcation and disembarcation and the cabin crew busy themselves with other duties in order to avoid dealing with the problem.

    As an easyJet+ cardholder, a privilege for which we pay £400/year, I feel very strongly about this and have written to them several times and they always say that they will ‘review procedures’ with the ground agents, and offer me a voucher for £50, which is fine but does not solve the problem or alleviate the unpleasantness at the airport.

    It is down to the herd mentality and ignorance of people who seem to be incapable of understanding : “Speedy Boarding and Priority Passengers only please.”

    EZY is by far my favourite s/h carrier and until a couple of years ago I was flying 70-100 sectors a year with them, it’s less now, maybe 30-50, and I hold them in very high regard for a number of reasons, but the boarding process leaves a lot to be desired.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    I am struggling to understand what is meant by ‘riseable’ (risible?).
    Is that the word they used, or is that your interpretation of their reason, and what did they say?

    The airline is responsible for accommodation and EZY are normally pretty fair. My son had a similar delay recently and his claim was paid in full and without delay.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Some airports keep you standing in a freezing cold or boiling hot airbridge for an absurd length of time, even if you have priority boarding. My pet hate is being jostled by other people when I’m forced to stand in a queue. I say airport as it does seem to be determined by the airport handling agents’ policies rather than the airline, at least at outstations.

    As others have said, it infuriates me when priority boarding pax are given priority boarding onto the bus, and then the masses get on, and when the doors are opened, it’s a free-for-all to get to the aircraft, with no attempt at segregation.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    I once reported a clearly abandoned duffel bag airside at LHR. A few minutes later, two security chaps walked over to it, one poked it with his foot and then kicked it, picked it up and slung it over his shoulder and walked off with it.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    PeterCoultas

    captonianm….assuming it doest get you into problems can you say why you have refused cubana, egyptair, emirates & el al flights….and, of course, if those reasons would still apply? Air India is obvious though (years back) india air was better

    Since you asked, I am happy to answer and it won’t cause me any problems other than that someone will no doubt take offence at my opinions, but I have lived with that all my life and am past caring. It is only a matter of time before someone will (probably anonymously) report my response as ‘inappropriate’.

    Cubana : Very poor safety record, and I did not wish to go to a communist country.

    Egyptair : I did some contract work for them and given their total lack of respect for procedures and common sense, I felt (rightly as time proved) that it was only a matter of time before they had another fatal crash. They were also extremely unpleasant people to work with and I had no wish to fly with them nor to set foot in their country again, least of all Cairo, which I thought was foul. For the record, I have been to other countries in the Middle East and enjoyed them and the people, so I am not anti-Arab or anti-Muslim.

    Emirates and Dubai, my twin pet hates.
    Dubai is vulgar, ostentatious, kitsch and built on slavery and exploitation. That is a matter of opinion and I understand that millions of people go there on holiday every year to enjoy the excellent hotels. Good, it keeps them away from other places.
    It is an Islamic state under whose laws alcohol and sex outside marriage are forbidden, and yet its tourist trade is largely built on sex tourism, with all the international hotels having bars crowded with prostitutes and their clients from all over the world, mostly brought in on Emirates. I have nothing against prostitution (providing that both parties are willing) nor against alcohol, it is the utter hypocrisy of the place that stinks to high heaven.
    It is an evil regime with a corrupt and rotten to the core ‘justice’ system.
    Emirates has achieved global dominance for years by undercutting most airlines on most of the routes it serves. Such dominance is not healthy. Added to which is the way it treats its employees and, when anything goes wrong, its customers.

    ElAl : Because having had the misfortune to work at several airports, I have the seen the way most Israelis behave. They are arrogant, aggressive, sly and utterly cold and charmless. I have no wish to fly with such people nor to work in their country, and I object to the the way they treat their Arab residents and neighbours.
    For the avoidance of doubt, I am referring to Israelis, not to Jewish people. Many people do not seem to understand that being anti-Israeli/anti-Zionist does not equate to being anti-Semitic, in particular since that term used correctly would encompass all Nilo-Hamitic people, who are also Semitic.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    Interesting analogy with very different numbers. I wonder what the ICO will consider an appropriate fine for BA’s data breach.

    As an aside, it has come to my notice through professional contacts that some online travel agencies in the UK, and no doubt elsewhere, are still storing full CC details in a non-secure way in the GDSs. The exposure to risk is low, but it should be nil.

    The operator of London’s Heathrow Airport has been fined GBP£120,000 (USD$156,500) by a UK data privacy regulator for failing to ensure that personal data held on its network was properly secured.

    The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) fine was for a 2017 incident when an employee of Heathrow Airport lost a USB memory stick that was subsequently found by a member of the public.

    The stick held 76 folders with over 1,000 files, some of which contained personal information including names, dates of birth and passport numbers of a number of airport employees. The data was neither encrypted nor password protected, the ICO said.

    The person who found the stick viewed it before handing it over to a national newspaper which took copies of the data before giving it back to the airport operator.

    The regulator said that although the personal data held on the stick made up only a small amount of the total files, it was particularly concerned about a training video which exposed ten individuals’ details, and the details of up to 50 aviation security personnel at the airport.

    “Data Protection should have been high on Heathrow’s agenda. But our investigation found a catalogue of shortcomings in corporate standards, training and vision that indicated otherwise,” ICO Director of Investigations, Steve Eckersley said.

    The ICO investigation found that only two percent of the 6,500-strong workforce had been trained in data protection.

    Other concerns included the widespread use of removable media in contravention of the company’s policies and guidance, and ineffective controls preventing personal data from being downloaded onto unauthorised or unencrypted media.

    Heathrow Airport said it had carried out remedial action when it was informed of the breach including reporting the matter to the police, acting to contain the incident and engaging a third party specialist to monitor the internet and dark web.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    I know a couple of people who really are important. They wouldn’t be caught dead using social media, let alone in public, nor making voice calls within earshot of strangers.

    As for those who who think they are important, that’s a different story!


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Sounds like my last trip to CPT on Edelweiss.

    Arrived 25 minutes early. Was about the tenth person off the ‘plane because I never rush, about 5 people ahead of me at immigration, bag on carousel when I got there, straight through customs and was in my car on the N2 10 minutes before STA.

    in reply to: When It All Goes Right

    capetonianm
    Participant

    My wife is as much of a BA fan as I am not, and even she says the choice of wines in the lounges is pretty poor.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Why can’t people live without this constant need for electronic entertainment on tap through the internet? What happened to books, magazines, newspapers, recorded music, conversation, dozing, enjoying a meal and a drink? Those are the things I do on a long flight, and even if internet were available free, as it sometimes is, I would be unlikely to do more than possibly send the odd email or log into BT Forum!

    5 users thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    Robert Ayling (remember him?) decided that British Airways should no longer be ‘British’ and in possibly one of the most disastrous ever re-livery schemes, and at vast expense, had BA’s fleets painted in various different schemes representing some of the countries to which the airline flew. Most of them looked as if a cat had thrown up over them.

    Maybe Alex is doing the same. Perhaps salami is cheaper than quality ham, mozarella (yuck!) cheaper than Stilton or Cheddar, and so on. There’s not much left about the airline that is British, so why keep up the pretence?

    Next it will be chorizo (no doubt pronounced as Chor-it-so by the Essex girl cabin crews) and jamon (the cheapest variety) washed down by San Miguel.

    What a farce BA has become under its Spanish excuse for management.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    One of my cards was compromised at the end of July (nothing to do with an airline) and the resultant mess, compounded by the unbelievable incompetency of the bank’s credit card division (NatWest) meant that I spent many frustrating hours on the ‘phone to them, has only finally been sorted out last week.

    They paid me about £300 in compensation, but that really does not make up for time wasted and aggravation. If it had been my only credit card, I would have been in an even worse situation.

    I feel very sorry for the victims of the BA hack and had I been one, I would have been on the bandwagon.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Who cares?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,848 total)
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