Window blinds

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This topic contains 127 replies, has 28 voices, and was last updated by  Flightlevel 2 Aug 2017
at 13:46
.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 131 total)

  • DavidGordon10
    Participant

    I am prompted to start this thread by John Harper’s comment in the London – Perth thread about window blinds in the 787.

    Like him, I loath the way that flight attendants can control the window blinds for the entire cabin, and I therefore would avoid this aircraft if possible. It is just anti-physiological to turn the cabin into a sunlight-free cigar tube on a daytime flight: you need bright light to help adjust your brain (for forum members feeling technical, look at “suprachiasmatic nucleus” on Wikipedia).

    On other aircraft, I will (a little unwillingly) accept a request to close the blinds when travelling through a zone where it is night and the sun is not shining. During daytime, I resent a flight attendant asking that I close my blinds because others are sleeping (as on a recent flight on EVA air from Taipei to London). Sleep if you wish: but I wish to stay awake and they are my windows.


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    This was discussed on another thread very recently…

    I am with you David, in that I also like to have window blinds up during daylight hours.

    On my last flight back from HKG I was in a constant fight with the crew who would close my blind, after I had left it marginally open, so the sun would wake me up.

    My answer is very simple if someone complains about the light keeping them awake. Use the eye shades that have been given out or book a window seat..

    I am sure that David will also concur that using the sun light (and also darkness) correctly, can reduce the effects of jet lag.


    DavidGordon10
    Participant

    Martyn – yes, absolutely! Use the sunlight and the real darkness correctly and it helps reduce the jet lag problem.


    AlanOrton1
    Participant

    In my experience Chinese based carriers are the greatest exponents of closing window blinds.

    On a flight with MU almost immediately after wheels up the crew came around and closed all the blinds in the J cabin (it was daylight).

    Have a daylight flight with CA from PEK-LHR later this month, so sadly expecting the same. While I’d like to keep one blind half open, I suspect this may not happen.


    Rockhopper
    Participant

    I was on a recent daytime transatlantic flight in J on American where the crew made an announcement after take off that the window shades should be lowered “as a courtesy to other passengers so the IFE screens can clearly be seen.”


    icenspice
    Participant

    I find it more conducive to R@R on a daytime flight to have all blinds closed, even if you don’t manage to get some kip.

    Flying from Osaka recently on AF, the FAs closed them all after lunch, except for one guy at the window who refused.

    But as you say, David, it was his seat. Although I don’t think he saw very much of Siberia nor was he interested. Bizarrely, he closed it just as we were descending!


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    My preference is also blinds up, during the day so I can see out, and at night for the same reason though I really don’t see how having the blinds up at night can disturb anyone as it’s dark. It annoys me when cabin crew come round and and try to quietly lower the blind. They are never quiet enough as they inevitably wake me up!

    At home I sleep with the window and curtains open, I accept on a plane you can’t leave a window open but you certainly can leave the blinds open.


    Flightlevel
    Participant

    Certainly its the window seat choice to control the blinds or why would you choose that seat (higher chance of DVT in Economy!) though courtesy to your nearby pax if they sleep and its bright sunlight. Crew like them closed to insulate the cabin and save heating, and thus fuel on longhaul.


    seasonedtraveller
    Participant

    I like the blinds open and normally book a window seat for that reason. I hate the fact that crew can override customer settings on the 787.
    For info, today’s afternoon QA flight from Doha to LHR had the damn blinds closed the whole trip (for me a late booking and had to sit in ‘E’).
    Depart 1255 and arrive 1730 in darkness so not on in my book.


    seasonedtraveller
    Participant

    Should read QR. Unable to edit….Just in case Mr Ekond gets offended by my lack of accuraccy again….


    Ekond222
    Participant

    SDT – Not offended at all my fat fingered friend, as it is a genuine mistake rather than embarrass yourself with constant exaggeration and self validation.


    GivingupBA
    Participant

    It could in theory be annoying if flight attendants ask me to close my blind, but equally it is annoying when an open blind near me stops me resting/ seeing the monitor or sleeping. So I’d rather act for the common good, i.e. if flight attendants are closing everyone’s blind, I’ll happily comply: and I’m happy if FAs ask the person by the one open blind to close it.

    Martyn, I really understand your ‘We can all use eye shades’ point, but can I suggest that not everyone can, e.g. for instance young kids/ babies don’t do well with them (probably some adults too?)

    Here’s my amusing true (and culturally interesting) story about window blinds – in the 1980s an American friend took the long Dammam to Riyadh train ride to enjoy the desert views all the way. The carriage was full of Saudis apart from him, who absolutely insisted on all blinds being fully down for the entire journey!


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    Crew like them closed to insulate the cabin and save heating, and thus fuel on longhaul.

    Flightlevel, I’m curious by that remark. Was it tongue in cheek or does it really make a difference?


    TCSH11
    Participant

    I am prompted to start this thread by John Harper’s comment in the London – Perth thread about window blinds in the 787.

    Like him, I loath the way that flight attendants can control the window blinds for the entire cabin, and I therefore would avoid this aircraft if possible. It is just anti-physiological to turn the cabin into a sunlight-free cigar tube on a daytime flight: you need bright light to help adjust your brain (for forum members feeling technical, look at “suprachiasmatic nucleus” on Wikipedia).

    On other aircraft, I will (a little unwillingly) accept a request to close the blinds when travelling through a zone where it is night and the sun is not shining. During daytime, I resent a flight attendant asking that I close my blinds because others are sleeping (as on a recent flight on EVA air from Taipei to London). Sleep if you wish: but I wish to stay awake and they are my windows.

    I am quite interested in your quote ” they are MY windows ” technically this is not so. If the majority of cabin are sleeping, then the crew go with the majority, so that means that the ” aircraft window blinds ” need to be closed. Also, during night flights, where you say you ” (a little unwillingly) close the blinds.. this is due to aircraft flying into daylight, and people, including passengers in sleeper seats, what to maximise the darkness. I would of though it would be respectful to other passengers to do this, if the majority want to sleep.


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    @tcsh11 – the same argument would not work if the majority of passengers in economy would prefer seats not to be reclined during the meal service. Cabin crew can make a request to a passenger but can not force a passenger to put a seat upright…especially if they are sleeping…

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