Window blind etiquette

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This topic contains 56 replies, has 25 voices, and was last updated by  MatchboxGirl 2 Aug 2019
at 08:41
.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 57 total)

  • SimonS1
    Participant

    @simons1

    We are all travellers in an enclosed space, a little bit of courtesy goes a long way.

    How would you deal with – you are in the aisle seat – the window seat passenger opens the window blind to let the sun light in with 3 hours to go before landing . You ask very politely for the passenger to lower the blind, the passenger half lowers it as a courtesy, but the light is still flooding in… how would you deal with the situation?

    I accept we need to be courteous in enclosed spaces, but how do you see the solution.

    Bottom line is, one passenger wants the blinds open, the other wants them closed…..

    Solution?

    3 hours to landing could mean anything Martin. An overnight NY to London where sleep is at a premium? Or a Asia to London where acclimatisation is easier?

    I would have a quick look around – is everyone else still trying to sleep? Is the sun bouncing off my IFE preventing me seeing it?

    If yes then I would probably ask again to close it out of courtesy. If no then I would accept the window seater’s actions as reasonable if they want to look out.

    Either way I would hope the window seater wouldn’t go on about “my window, my blind, my decision” etc. Sounds a very selfish attitude, albeit sadly a particularly common one among business types who think the world revolves around them.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    If it is my window it is my window blind.

    If one takes this argument a step further, I could say “if it is my aisle seat I don’t have to move or let anyone else in or out unless I choose to do so.”
    One of the several reasons I prefer a window seat is to have the use of the window and control the blind, but the latter has to be done with consideration for others.

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    DavidGordon10
    Participant

    When I wrote “If it is my window it is my window blind” I should have included a qualification – I always request an aisle seat on long haul flights, so it is not “my” window, it is the window of the person who is sitting there – and it is up to them what they do with the blind.

    Two additional observations:

    1. I do regard it as crazy to slam all the window blinds shut on a daylight westbound flight, Europe to America. Why do it? Using the natural daylight will help you to adapt to the change of time zone and thus minimize jetlag. On a recent United flight, London to Chicago, this happened even before we were at cruising altitude. The purser told me that if they did not close all the blinds, they would be inundated with complaints. Why?

    2. We differ in our need for light. As I am over 70, myopic and with early cataracts, I need bright light to be able to read with comfort. You may need as little light as possible for the optimum view of your in-flight entertainment. We need to be conscious of each other, and I worry that window blinds closed seems often to be the default.

    Remember that Goethe’s last words are often rendered as “More light!” but actually he probably said “Open the second shutter so that more light may come in”


    SimonS1
    Participant

    When I wrote “If it is my window it is my window blind” I should have included a qualification – I always request an aisle seat on long haul flights, so it is not “my” window, it is the window of the person who is sitting there – and it is up to them what they do with the blind.

    Two additional observations:

    1. I do regard it as crazy to slam all the window blinds shut on a daylight westbound flight, Europe to America. Why do it? Using the natural daylight will help you to adapt to the change of time zone and thus minimize jetlag. On a recent United flight, London to Chicago, this happened even before we were at cruising altitude. The purser told me that if they did not close all the blinds, they would be inundated with complaints. Why?

    2. We differ in our need for light. As I am over 70, myopic and with early cataracts, I need bright light to be able to read with comfort. You may need as little light as possible for the optimum view of your in-flight entertainment. We need to be conscious of each other, and I worry that window blinds closed seems often to be the default.

    Remember that Goethe’s last words are often rendered as “More light!” but actually he probably said “Open the second shutter so that more light may come in”

    Indeed that is precisely the reason why common sense is needed. Life is not black and white – a daytime eastbound is different to say an overnight westbound where people may not wish to wake at 5am to floods of light.

    And let’s face it, whilst you may have a need for light someone else may have a need for rest.

    That’s why a bit of common sense and courtesy is better than me, me, me.


    christopheL
    Participant

    Once upon a time passengers used eye shades when they wanted to sleep in a daylight atmosphere.
    How stupid they were. It is so easy to make people live in darkness during daylight hours.
    Etiquette is the magic word !
    Did anyone tried this on a commuter train during summer ?


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    Did anyone tried this on a commuter train during summer ?

    – this I would love to see.. guards/ticket officers going through carriages London to Scotland on a day run, closing blackout screens…..


    SimonS1
    Participant

    Once upon a time passengers used eye shades when they wanted to sleep in a daylight atmosphere.

    How stupid they were. It is so easy to make people live in darkness during daylight hours.

    Etiquette is the magic word !

    Did anyone tried this on a commuter train during summer ?

    Once upon a time travellers showed a bit of courtesy towards each other, rather than thinking about me, me, me.

    The trouble is daylight hours could mean anything. Try explaining to people on an overnight summer NYC to London that they should be woken at 4am because someone in the window seat wants to have the blind open.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    JJ

    SimonS1
    Participant

    Did anyone tried this on a commuter train during summer ?

    – this I would love to see.. guards/ticket officers going through carriages London to Scotland on a day run, closing blackout screens…..

    I would love to see it too…commuter trains where I live don’t have blackout screens, and I can’t remember the last time I saw a guard/ticket officer.


    canucklad
    Participant

    – this I would love to see.. guards/ticket officers going through carriages London to Scotland on a day run, closing blackout screens…..

    I can imagine it now …..
    “My god man , how selfish can you be , don’t you know people can’t use their devices In the glare . After all , It’s only an ancient Cathedral, a 19th century viaduct , a monastery dating back to the middle ages and some of the best coastal views in the world, and you want to stop fellow passengers interacting with their devices just so you can catch a momentarily glimpse of old stuff …Shame. Shame ,Shame on you !! “

    4 users thanked author for this post.

    Suhail
    Participant

    Individual passengers should have the choice as to whether or not they want the blinds to be lowered. Cabin crew should not be making the decision and people who want darkness can use eyeshades, the way I do.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    The day I tire of this view will be the day I stop travelling.. (and close the blind)..

    (only filter used was the aircraft window)

    Attachments:
    5 users thanked author for this post.

    entenseyere
    Participant

    I travel a good deal from Asia on Cathay and Singapore.
    If I am asleep with the blind open at dawn and others are sleeping the crew will quietly close it.
    This for me is not a problem and just common sense.


    entenseyere
    Participant

    I travel a good deal from Asia on Cathay and Singapore.

    If I am asleep with the blind open at dawn and others are sleeping the crew will quietly close it.
    https://www.spankhole.com/

    This for me is not a problem and just common sense.

    But once I had some problems with foreigners in Singapore. Was a bad experience but everything was ended good.


    cwoodward
    Participant

    No-not ‘foreigners’in Singapore!
    Perhaps the end of civilisation as we know it ?

    Seriously, what sort of ‘foreigners’ were they ? I wonder as in many places I am considered a foreigner and in some places even a ‘ghost man’….. and smelly to !
    Some people wont even sit next to me on the train……..

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    AFlyingDutchman
    Participant

    @cwoodward

    I’d sit next to you on a train, you seem interesting! 🙂

    2 users thanked author for this post.
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