Which airports should be completely demolished and rebuilt?

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This topic contains 99 replies, has 50 voices, and was last updated by  LuganoPirate 23 Aug 2019
at 15:27
.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 100 total)

  • AnthonyDunn
    Participant

    @ IanFromHKG – 25/09/2015 09:35 BST

    Who you should blame for short-termism with ChepLapKok is neither HMG nor the Transportation Department of the HK Government but the Government of the People’s Republic of China.

    Having been a party to the decision making around the handover in 1997, the Beijing Government did a Violet Elizabeth about the building of a new airport: they squeemed and squeemed and squeemed, accusing HMG (and the then HK Governor) of raiding the territory’s balances for the benefit of British companies and to render a post-handover territory devoid of resources. We can all see that their position was ludicrous and that the stance taken by HMG was entirely correct: a much needed replacement for KaiTak was delivered on-time and on-cost – but a compromise had to be made to shut up Beijing: the extra terminal capacity.

    But the one thing that the mainland Chinese government never does it admit its own mistakes and short-comings. Ever.

    Thanks for the advance warning on BKK – which I will shortly be sampling/enduring for myself – including the new CX lounge.


    MrDarwin
    Participant

    I can’t help but think… what are we asking for here? We’d like super hub airports that fly to hundreds or thousands of destinations, offering flexible scheduling through multiple daily flights…. from an airport with just a quick, convenient short stroll from security to gates, security to lounge, lounge to gates, gates to gates for transfers. With optional/less shopping.

    The only way I could see that physically being achieved is a multistorey airport with higher airport fees to counter the reduction in retail revenue. Travel has changed, traveller demand is driving bigger airports and the bigger the airport, usually, the greater the inconvenience/distance to walk between airport rituals.

    I personally don’t mind the shopping-run after security thing, it traps more people in there which means less people in the terminal/lounge.


    Alsacienne
    Participant

    STANSTED shopping mall and PHILADELPHIA A-WEST … what a welcome to the USA (not).


    transtraxman
    Participant

    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Tim –

    That BER article dates back to July. Recently the construction teams have found more problems and so even the revised opening date of 2017 is in doubt.

    And when BER does open it will be busy from day one as not only must be absorb the traffic from TXL (assuming it is closed down as planned) but Berlin air traffic is growing year on year.


    TimFitzgeraldTC
    Participant

    Hi Alex

    Yes it is a bit late. But fascinating the story behind the events so far (to that point). I’m not expecting anything before 2020!

    Sad really that they have made a complete pigs ear of it.


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    AnthonyDunn, I hope for your sake that the new CX lounge (which opened earlier this year, and which I haven’t yet tried) is an improvement on the old!

    Oh, and I am well aware of the politics around CLKIA – that is why I said the question of who to blame was too long and complicated!


    canucklad
    Participant

    Morning Tim, cheers for the Brandenburg link….good to see another country apart from ourselves make a dog’s dinner of a major building project. I remember using the place years ago when construction had already started.
    Ironic, that it’s in the city that built the airport that was to become the template for all future airports….


    MrMichael
    Participant

    For me it is LCY. I just find the place all rather claustrophobic. From a design point of view it likely cuts the mustard considering the footprint it has. I just feel I am departing/arriving at a temporary airport.


    AnthonyDunn
    Participant

    @ canucklad – 26/09/2015 09:06 BST

    The truth is that plenty of places make an absolute horlicks of their major infrastructure projects. It is just that we in the UK, with an hubristic meedjah that delights in pointing out how incompetent everyone is but themselves, make a very particular point of flagging up any shortcomings – and in a way that is pretty much unrivalled anywhere else in the world.

    The Berlin Brandenburg fiasco should be viewed for what it is: a world-class balls up! Yes, even the Germans can comprehensively bog it. I loved Siemens’ “blocking” response when quizzed about their responsibility for the alarm system wiring debacle. The architecture aside, it might just be that the Berlin authorities should have insisted that their contractors dismantle it all and start again. The fact that the opening could well be up to eight years late, the budget has mushroomed and they have pretty much dried out the well of excuses for this ineptitude says it all.


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Re: Berlin Brandenburg

    We’ve just posted a news piece about this airport. More problems have been encountered and some critics are now suggesting it be demolished and rebuilt.

    Tegel will remain operational for longer (this is something we reported last December) but now the latest news is that Schonefeld will be expanded.

    http://www.businesstraveller.com/news/101093/berlin-brandenburg-will-it-ever-open


    canucklad
    Participant

    Morning AD,

    Interestingly enough, Siemens was also a major contributor up here in Edinburgh to the fiasco that , and in the very annoying tradition of sticking the word “Gate” at the end of another word thus linking it to something controversial/illegal……..Tramgate

    Widely known that they acted unscrupulously when they realised the local councillors who negotiated the contracts were lacking in every sense ……..business acumen and more importantly naïve ty ……


    AnthonyDunn
    Participant

    @ canucklad – 28/09/2015 11:10 BST

    And there I was thinking that the erstwhile GEC Avionics had invented the dictionary of excuses for project delays and cost overruns on systems design and integration – it was the Nimrod Airborne Early Warning programme that I recall only too painfully, before it was cancelled after some £hundreds of millions (or was it billions?). Maybe they had Siemens (UK) as a subby?


    Charles-P
    Participant

    AnthonyDunn – regretfully the RAF and radar systems have a long history of supplier failure. The Panavia Tornado was an obvious example with the ‘Foxhunter’ radar replaced by concrete blocks at one point. Known to the crews as the ‘Blue Circle Radar’ after the famous brand of cement.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 100 total)
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