Turkish Airlines Hell – What’s best way to complain

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 32 total)

  • GBAIR72
    Participant

    All an update. Turkish airlines just brushed me off. I am stunned.

    I already cancelled my flight on 26th with Turkish and booked on British and Qatar.

    Thanks everyone for all your comments it’s so nice to have forum where this can be discussed.


    canucklad
    Participant

    Turkish airlines just brushed me off. I am stunned.

    Consider yourself lucky GNAIR72, at least you got a response, their normal modus operandi is to just ignore you and hope you go away.
    All these years later my Air Canada account never ever got credited with the points I was due : )

    Anyway, have a great Christmas regardless of TK’s negligence


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    GBAir72, have you tried telling them of your corporate spending power, how much that is and how much they have to lose? That might elicit some attention.

    Sorry to hear of your troubles.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Not Turkish Airlines, but a Turkish airline (Pegasus?) has just had a crash, apparently mercifully no casualties out of 177 on board, at SAW. It looks very nasty from the pictures, so probably a text-book evacuation and excellent support from emergency services, but once again, not a good look for Turkish aviation.

    This is one of numerous incidents for this airline.
    https://www.aeroinside.com/incidents/airline/pegasus
    This list includes technical incidents, but several indicate worryingly poor standards of airmanship.


    cwoodward
    Participant

    This the 3rd time in 3 years that these clowns have done this and totaled the aircraft.
    The last time of the end of the runway and over a cliff as I recall in February 2018 cause was the captain overruling the the FO (flying) decision to go round due to poor conditions.
    This time was even worse airmanship with the aircraft landing 1600m past the landing area and still doing 650 knots as it passed the end of the runway becoming airborne again as it went over a cliff then across a road ending in pieces against the airport boundary wall.
    Aircraft in 3 pieces and an absolute miracle that all were not killed.
    Conditions were OK but a 27 knot tailwind which is not unusual for this airport and not any real problem for a competent pilot.


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    “a 27 knot tailwind which is not unusual for this airport and not any real problem for a competent pilot” – I know there are many other factors to consider, weather, runway length, landing weight… but a 27 knot tailwind for a landing jet, is not insignificant


    canucklad
    Participant

    Would be wrong to jump the gun and start the blame game, but if I was working for the NTSB or the AAIB I’d certainly take notice of the fact that one of the pilots was South Korean and if he’s not the captain then wonder at how effective the CRM was?


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Landing with a tailwind is not very smart under most circumstances. The more I read about this accident,the more I am convinced that this airline’s practices are dangerous and negligent.

    Whether this extends to Turkish Airlines is another matter, but I am not going to chance it and it’s another carrier to put on my no-fly list.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    philsquares
    Participant

    This the 3rd time in 3 years that these clowns have done this and totaled the aircraft.
    The last time of the end of the runway and over a cliff as I recall in February 2018 cause was the captain overruling the the FO (flying) decision to go round due to poor conditions.
    This time was even worse airmanship with the aircraft landing 1600m past the landing area and still doing 650 knots as it passed the end of the runway becoming airborne again as it went over a cliff then across a road ending in pieces against the airport boundary wall.
    Aircraft in 3 pieces and an absolute miracle that all were not killed.
    Conditions were OK but a 27 knot tailwind which is not unusual for this airport and not any real problem for a competent pilot.

    The 737 has a limit of 10 knots tailwind component (15 is available at an additional cost from Boeing). Any pilot who tries to land with a 27 knot tailwind is not a competent pilot but a true idiot! The simple solution is to tell ATC “Unable”. That solves the problem and you get a runway change. The prior aircraft did a missed approach due to the tailwinds. That should be a good hint.


    cwoodward
    Participant

    @philsquares
    The published recommended tail wind limit is in fact 15 knots for this 737-800 aircraft.
    I made my above comments due to the extremely long runway available -from memory about 3400 meters and the otherwise reasonable conditions.
    Had the pilot not landed ‘hot’ at I understand over 200 knots, not touched down 1600 meters down the runway and been in any way competent this accident would not have happened.
    I fully agree with you that with 25 knots tail at the time landing was not a wise decision if there was in fact an alternate available.
    However it has been suggested that he was out of fuel due to a long holding. If so the decision to land was unavoidable but the competence displayed abismal.

    A competent pilot would have got the plane landed even with this strong tail wind. This outfit should be blacklisted – but it won’t happen because Turkish aviation runs on different safety parameters and competence than the rest of aviation.

    From the AV HERALD “According to Mode-S data transmitted by the aircraft the aircraft landed long and hot, 1500 meters before the runway threshold the aircraft was descending through 950 feet MSL (corrected for local pressure, actual Mode-S reading 1500 feet)/661 feet AGL at 194 knots over ground, touched down about abeam taxiways T/F (about 1950 meters/6400 feet past the threshold, about 1000 meters/3300 feet before the runway end) at about 130 knots over ground, overran the end of the runway at about 63 knots over ground veering slightly to the left (last transponder transmission), hit the localizer antenna runway 06, went over an airport road and a cliff and impacted the airport perimeter wall”

    From PPRUNE ‘On first contact with the tower he called established ILS 06 and was told wind 300/11 kts so basically fully cross. He was then cleared to land and given a wind 270/25 knots which he seems to have missed. I have known tower controllers prompt with a query like, can you accept? The actual tailwind component is not absolutely reliably displayed on the 737 for various reasons. You can have the pilot non flying call it out from the FMC but there are caveats as to its accuracy. So the tower wind is the deciding factor. If you don’t process the information and then fail to go-around when you miss the touchdown zone (which I see as just as big an issue as the tailwind) then this is what happens.’


    openfly
    Participant

    As I have said on here previously….NEVER fly a Turkish airline. Just look at the history, it is self-explanatory. 27kts tailwind!!

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    Interesting video about the runway

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    An accident at Istanbul’s second airport that killed three people and injured 179 others on Wednesday was a result of errors of judgement, insufficient infrastructure investment and a stubborn ignorance of technical know-how, experts say.

    https://ahvalnews-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/ahvalnews.com/aviation/istanbul-airport-accident-result-errors-negligence-and-ignorance-experts-say?amp


    capetonianm
    Participant

    BREAKING Pegasus Boeing 737-800 evacuated after landing at Dusseldorf Airport

    Passengers of Pegasus flight #PC1003 from Istanbul were evacuated after the Boeing 737-800 landed at Dusseldorf.

    After the landing of the Boeing 737-800 (reg. TC-CPU registered), fire and smoke were noticed coming from the landing gear. As smoke was noticed by ATC controllers, emerging from the wheels, decision was took to evacuate the passengers.

    Another incident with Pegasus. Not necessarily due to poor airmanship, at this stage not clear.

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