The popular much anticipated Airbus A321XLR final certification very close.

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  • cwoodward
    Participant

    Airbus is working on the “Instructions for Continued Airworthiness” (ICAs) which is the final small step for the A321XLR aircraft to meet its fixed deadline for certification of mid 2024.
    The A321XLR has now received the needed new main landing gear, new wing flaps, new integrated long-range rear center fuel tank (RCT) requiring a new fuel system, a new high-capacity water & waste system, a new extended belly-fairing, and higher maximum take-off weight certification. All of these involve changes to their related ICAs.

    The ‘game changing aircraft’ should enter service by end 3rd quarter with Iberia (IB) now confirming it will be the first airline to introduce the A321XLR into the market “by the end of the summer.” With the XLR burning 30% less fuel per seat than previous generation competitor aircraft, at roughly half the trip cost of modern widebodies explains why Airbus has received more than 600 orders so far, from over 27 customers!

    Built to fly up to 11 hours nontop the A321XLR will open new, previously uneconomical routes and connect most popular city pairs.

    Many airlines from Asia,the Middle East, and South America have a ordered the A321XLR as has Europe’s IAG group, American Airlines, United Airlines, JetBlue, and Qantas making it a highly anticipated aircraft in most markets – and another nail in Boeing’s probal coffin.

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    DerekVH
    Participant

    I just cannot imagine an 11 hour flight on a single aisle aircraft.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    I hear what you say DerekVH …but before the 747 arrived in the 1970s all long-haul 707/DC-8 flights were with single-aisle aircraft.

    The difference then was that there was more pitch (legroom) although, having said that, the early 747s did provide more space (greater legroom, more sideways room) than the 707s/DC-8s.

    But of course the airlines later decided to increase 747 seating capacity in economy class !

    4 users thanked author for this post.

    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    One airline @cwoodward you forget to mention is Icelandair.

    I say that because Icelandair has long been a Boeing customer but decided to make the switch to Airbus and its A321XLR.

    Hannah wrote a new piece on April 11, 2023.

    Icelandair is becoming a significant player in the sixth-freedom market between Europe and North America via Reykjavik.

    Although this airline currently operates some of its transatlantic services with the 737 MAX it is the A321XLR which has a greater range and can offer the possibility of serving more cities.

    4 users thanked author for this post.

    cwoodward
    Participant

    Iberia’s announcement of 19th May promised a pleasant roomy business class cabin that seemingly offers a longhaul standard of comfort.

    “In its Business cabin, the A321XLR will have 14 individual window seats with direct access to the aisle. In addition, the seats will offer maximum comfort, with a ‘full flat’ seat that converts into a bed, a wide leather headrest, compartments for personal items and a structure that offers great comfort and privacy”

    Seemingly the the XLR will offer the cabin air pressure advances enjoyed by advanced wide body aircraft “One of several notable passenger/crew wellbeing-related features of the A321XLR during long cruise at high flight levels is the latest ‘cabin pressure control’ standard (introduced across all the A320 Family). The system actively schedules proportional cabin altitudes depending on the flight level. For the A321XLR this means that a cabin altitude of less than 6,000ft is achieved when the aircraft is cruising at 33,000ft. Low cabin altitudes create a more comfortable and less fatiguing in-flight environment for passengers and crew”
    A huge advancement in cabin comfort from the the 707s/DC-8s and 747s that Alex mentions above.

    It will I believe be interesting see what the many other airlines XLR’s will offer in passenger cabin comfort features and I look forward to the opportunity of flying on the aircraft.

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