The end of the lorry of the sky

Back to Forum
Viewing 12 posts - 76 through 87 (of 87 total)

  • cwoodward
    Participant

    Of course although the A380 has more nominal capacity, as a freighter the extra space is largely unusable as the aircraft is unable to cope with the extra weight of a full freight loading. There are also several other more technical deficiencies.
    Unless for a specialised purpose that involves lightweight cargo the A3800 makes a very poor freighter.


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    I shall be interested to see LH Tecknik’s A380 conversion.

    A380 superjumbo modified for passenger-cargo use


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Just announced via Reuters … Qatar Airways will keep its A380s grounded “until at least mid to late June 2021” says the CEO.

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-health-coronavirus-qatar-airways/dont-resist-order-deferrals-qatar-airways-tells-jetmakers-idUKKBN2391FA


    JohnnyG
    Participant

    Just announced via Reuters … Qatar Airways will keep its A380s grounded “until at least mid to late June 2021” says the CEO.

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-health-coronavirus-qatar-airways/dont-resist-order-deferrals-qatar-airways-tells-jetmakers-idUKKBN2391FA

    10 A380’s on the ground for another 12 months is a bit of a hit as the oldest was only delivered in Sept 2014 but with other airlines getting rid of theirs the second hand market I should imagine is through the floor.


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Earlier it was mentioned that SIA was parking A380s at Alice Springs (Australia).

    But as I thought only a proportion of the A380 fleet is being stored there. If this tweet is correct some have gone to the US.


    terryharding
    Participant

    Why do you think this is fantastic news? With the demise of the Boeing 747 because of the age of aircraft, that only leaves the A340 and the A380 and if both of these aircraft types disappear from the sky, air fares on many routes will increase when airlines have to use smaller aircraft.


    cwoodward
    Participant

    Singapore Airlines parked 5 more aircraft at Alice Springs a few days ago.
    2 more A380 and 3 Dreamliners according to AU reports.


    Swissdiver
    Participant

    Filling up large long haul planes will take time. So I guess the B787s alike will be the first back in operation while the four engines’ might never come back…


    Woodpecker
    Participant

    Similar to the Concorde, the A380 was ahead of its time. Nothing wrong whatsoever with the aircraft, not a single crash. It’s just that first the economic downturn & now the covid virus have taken their toll on this giant.

    I love the aircraft, and can’t wait to get back on one. There must be a reason airlines are moth balling them rather than sending them to the scrapyard.

    What’s to say that a decade or two later people will be nostalgic to travel on the A380, the same way we feel about the Boeing 747 today.

    5 users thanked author for this post.

    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    Similar to the Concorde, the A380 was ahead of its time.

    Similar to Concorde, both never managed to infiltrate the USA airline market. Concorde was banned from overflying the USA at full speed and not one USA airline purchased a 380…


    Swissdiver
    Participant

    Not quite. Concorde was a great plane, that failed commercially because indeed the USA were protectionist. The A380 is a massive strategic mistake from Airbus and had no chance to generate any form of return on investment. And without the surreal Emirates orders, it would have failed much earlier. Boing was right. The future is point to point, not hub to hub.


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Similar to the Concorde, the A380 was ahead of its time.

    Similar to Concorde, both never managed to infiltrate the USA airline market. Concorde was banned from overflying the USA at full speed and not one USA airline purchased a 380…

    Martyn – another fact was that Concorde had range only for the US East Coast / Caribbean.

    When it operated with AF to Rio it had to make a fuel stop in West Africa. When it operated that JV BA/SQ flight to Singapore it stopped in the Gulf … and it would be subsonic LHR-BAH so supersonic only for BAH-SIN.

    It was a similar story with the VC-10. In terms of passenger appeal and performance (take off and landing at high altitudes) it too was ahead of its time.

    But it didn’t sell in the US because it’s maximum range was LON-ORD … crucially the VC-10 could not operate Europe to US West Coast non-stop.

    So when BOAC operated its VC-10s to the US West Coast they had to route via NYC. Yes BOAC did operate to the West Coast non-stop but then it deployed a B707.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
Viewing 12 posts - 76 through 87 (of 87 total)
You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Business Traveller April 2020 edition
Business Traveller April 2020 edition
Be up-to-date
Magazine Subscription
To see our latest subscription offers for Business Traveller editions worldwide, click on the Subscribe & Save link below
Polls