Special assistance – to tip or not to tip ?

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Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)

  • DannyBoy
    Participant

    In the US you are also expected to also pay tips at buffets. The reason for this while the food/drink is paid for as part of your ticket, the drink will need to be prepared, served, glass cleared away etc. Hence you need to show your appreciation to the staff. Some would consider it proper to go further and add a tip even if a service charge is included. There are some great sketches on the Curb Your Enthusiasm tv series regarding tipping.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    LetsGoOutside
    Participant

    From what I understand, staff working in airport/airline lounges – even the bar staff – receive a full salary (I am talking about the US, again with the caveat that the salary may be at or not much above minimum wage). This said, the expectation of a tip may come from the fact that there is usually a not insignificant difference between the economic status of airport lounge visitors and that of the bar staff. I don’t expect anybody flying First or Business (or with a premium credit card or airline status giving access to lounges) to hurt because they left change on the bar counter but it is not mandatory.

    One point I should have made earlier is that if you use a discount coupon to buy a meal or a service when a certain percentage tip is normal practice for your purchase, the tip percentage should apply to the full cost before rebate associated with the coupon (but you don’t have to tip on the sales tax). Example for the US: you buy dinner for two and you have a coupon for one free meal. Assume the price of each meal shows at 15 USD on the menu. You will receive a bill for 15.00 USD plus tax – let’s say at 10% depending on where you are in the US – i.e. a total of 16.50 USD (in some US states/cities, the tax will apply on the full cost before coupon, in which case your bill will be 18.00 USD i.e. 15.00 USD plus tax on 30.00 USD if the sales tax rate is 10%). No matter how the tax is calculated (and, yes, all this would be easier if prices displayed in the US included sales tax like they do in Europe for VAT), you have to tip on 30.00 USD, not on 15.00 USD. There is no reason for the wait staff to be underpaid because you are a savvy coupon clipper (also, the coupon was issued by the restaurant owner, not by the wait staff…). Have a nice trip all!


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    The American ‘tipping’ system appears to differ from the rest of the worlds tipping system.

    In America, tipping appears to be compulsory and CONSIDERED as part of the employees / servers / food delivery management or whatever other euphemism chosen, wages. i.e. employers short changes employee and passes this cost as an additional charge to customer. As we all know it is EXPECTED regardless of service level.

    Rest of the world, tipping appears a reward from the customer to a server for a high level of service.

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    ViajeroUK
    Participant

    LetsGoOutside quote quote=1110392]you have to tip on 30.00 USD, not on 15.00 USD. There is no reason for the wait staff to be underpaid because you are a savvy coupon clipper (also, the coupon was issued by the restaurant owner, not by the wait staff…). Have a nice trip all![/quote]

    You HAVE to tip? No, I do NOT HAVE to tip, it is my decision based on the dining experience.


    DannyBoy
    Participant

    LetsGoOutside quote quote=1110392]you have to tip on 30.00 USD, not on 15.00 USD. There is no reason for the wait staff to be underpaid because you are a savvy coupon clipper (also, the coupon was issued by the restaurant owner, not by the wait staff…). Have a nice trip all![/quote]

    You HAVE to tip? No, I do NOT HAVE to tip, it is my decision based on the dining experience.

    Many years ago, I was told you MUST regardless of the quality of service received or your own moral standing as this is American etiquette. If there is a problem at any point you need to address this with the manager so the issues can be resolved sooner than later. If problems persist then the tip left should be of a small amount than the standard value.


    jsn55
    Participant

    As far as America is concerned, it’s important to remember that all the ‘tipping pressure’ is applied because customers respond to it. People with brains tip for good service; people swayed by public opinion or pressure tip unwillingly and complain about it. Nobody in their right mind would think that tipping is appropriate at a self-service buffet. The ‘tipping pressure’ works here, and as long as the sheep continue to respond, the pressure will continue. If you have bad service, the only ‘rule’ is that you leave -0- on the bill so it’s clear that you didn’t forget to tip.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    PeterCoultas
    Participant

    I find in the USA that leaving a few cents (smaller the better) as a tip makes the point that the service was poor…

    2 users thanked author for this post.
Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
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