Smoking in terrace restaurants of major known brand hotels hotels….

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  IanFromHKG 26 Jul 2019
at 05:36
.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)

  • MartynSinclair
    Participant

    I have just spent 4 wonderful days in what for me was an amazing hotel. 30 minutes from an international hotel, room was 10 metres from the beach, hotel had full facilities & independent restaurants were numerous, in the local village, all within 20 minute (max) walk.

    Hotel was a very well known brand and it was within the Marriott Bonvoy catalogue / programme.

    The only problem encountered was the smoking in the breakfast / dinner terrace restaurant. It was a open air restaurant that had a semi permanent cover. We both found it extremely oppressive to be next to a table of smokers, during a meal, especially breakfast. The smokers in general were not the nationals of the country we were visiting. I accept in the local village, the smoking rules are more relaxed. However, in a known international hotel brand, I would have thought there would have been a more consistent smoking rule in areas where food was being served.

    Should the branded hotels have a more consistent smoking policy or is it acceptable, even in a terrace style (closed roof) restaurant, that smoking should be allowed, where clearly, other guests (not just me), will be affected. As a side issue, the restaurant could very easily have designated smoking and no smoking areas, but chose not to….

    Any thoughts or am I being a typical ‘reformed smoker’….


    K1ngston
    Participant

    I have just spent 4 wonderful days in what for me was an amazing hotel. 30 minutes from an international hotel, room was 10 metres from the beach, hotel had full facilities & independent restaurants were numerous, in the local village, all within 20 minute (max) walk.

    Hotel was a very well known brand and it was within the Marriott Bonvoy catalogue / programme.

    The only problem encountered was the smoking in the breakfast / dinner terrace restaurant. It was a open air restaurant that had a semi permanent cover. We both found it extremely oppressive to be next to a table of smokers, during a meal, especially breakfast. The smokers in general were not the nationals of the country we were visiting. I accept in the local village, the smoking rules are more relaxed. However, in a known international hotel brand, I would have thought there would have been a more consistent smoking rule in areas where food was being served.

    Should the branded hotels have a more consistent smoking policy or is it acceptable, even in a terrace style (closed roof) restaurant, that smoking should be allowed, where clearly, other guests (not just me), will be affected. As a side issue, the restaurant could very easily have designated smoking and no smoking areas, but chose not to….

    Any thoughts or am I being a typical ‘reformed smoker’….

    Martyn, as a fellow reformed smoker I totally agree with you about hotels that allow smoking in their restaurants etc. This tends to be in Indonesia in this part of the world, and I am afraid you have to grin and bear it or try and find out the establishments smoking policy. As for the establishment banning or stopping smoking it is such an ingrained part of society especially in Indonesia that they will not sustain their business especially with locals … Tough one indeed as I find it hard to enjoy any food with someone puffing a “fag” close by… And no I make no excuses for the smokers amongst you, albeit most here wouldn’t smoke in a public restaurant I am sure…….


    esselle
    Participant

    I am also a reformed smoker but don’t really agree with your sentiments here.

    It is still the case that many countries permit open air smoking (rightly or wrongly, but that isn’t the point), in designated areas, and so the only sensible thing to do is ask that you are seated as far away from the smoking area as possible.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    As a lifelong non-smoker, even when young I didn’t go to pubs and restaurants for a long time as I couldn’t stand the smell of smoke around, and worse was going home and your clothes and hair (I don’t have enough now for it be a problem) stinking of stale smoke.

    I welcomed the smoking ban in public places that has gradually come in around the world, but it is a shame that the pleasure of eating outside is so frequently marred by smoke drifting across from other tables. Where people are legitimately allowed to smoke, there is little we can do or say, but I do make a point of asking to be as far away as possible from smokers. I fail to understand why outside areas can’t be split into smoking/non-smoking areas, of course it’s not a perfect solution but it would help.

    Some 20+ years ago I celebrated my birthday with a dinner in a Parador in Spain, that country of course being one of the last bastions of smoking, and we had booked a table outside on the terrace, requesting that we be kept as far from smokers a possible. When we arrived I found the ‘maitre d’ to reiterate the request. I was treated at first with incredulity, as if there were a language problem, and then as if I were some kind of dangerous lunatic. As other people came in and were shown to their tables, we were pointed at as if we were some rare species. Guess what, it worked, and the polluters of clean air were kept well away from us.

    At one time on SAA aircraft smoking was on one side and non-smoking on the other, separated only by the aisle. I don’t know what lunatic thought that up, but I always remember the words of an Indian Minister of Transport who said :
    “Having smoking and non-smoking areas on a public conveyance is as useful as having a urinating and a non-urinating section in a swimming pool.”


    stevescoots
    Participant

    I am a smoker, and i dont go along with this crap of personal freedom to smoke. like so much these days it’s down to peoples lack of consideration to others, even in situations where smoking is allowed such as Martyn describes I always look around and if I do not see anyone else smoking at the tables around me then I would not light up, I also do not stand immediately outside doorways in places where smoking is not allowed. In this particular case if there was nowhere else to eat separated from smokers then the hotel should have it as no smoking, or as a brand hotel with a suitable budget provide a separate area

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    canucklad
    Participant

    I’ve never smoked in my life so I don’t have an evangelical reformed smokers . Never understood why people want to puff on a toxic stick but have been generally indifferent to habit.
    Indifference would have been a good word to describe my attitude to smokers, excepting for my loved ones who smoked, refusing to feed their habit.

    Of late, I’ve noticed my tolerance levels dipping below the line of acceptance, and find myself having to bite my tongue to stop needless intervention.

    The only rationale I can come up with for this developing animosity is that my key senses have { probably ] reenergised and are now more sensitive than they ever have been .

    Since the implementation of the smoking ban here in Scotland my senses have become more acutely aware of colleagues who come back into the office from the smoke shelter with their nicotine infused jackets , or the waft of smoke as people puff away at bus stops or beer gardens , or worse being caught up in a fart blast or a fog of a vaping cloud.

    All perfectly legal activities that at an intellectual level I need to accept, despite the disgusting intrusion on my primary senses .

    Alas Martyn, If someone doesn’t have the self-awareness of their own negative actions I fear you’re going to have to adopt (and as an ex-smoker) a more emphatic approach to others self-indulgence

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    AFlyingDutchman
    Participant

    I am not a cigarette smoker, but do enjoy a cigar, but would never ever consider smoking one anywhere near where others might be dining. And when I do light up in a space where it is allowed, I always ask those around if they would mind, and if anyone does, I will refrain from lighting up. That said, I do get annoyed by the PC brigade particularly in the USA where often just seeing someone smoking and they start to cough in derision and give looks of hate.


    canucklad
    Participant

    At one time on SAA aircraft smoking was on one side and non-smoking on the other, separated only by the aisle. I don’t know what lunatic thought that up, but I always remember the words of an Indian Minister of Transport who said :
    “Having smoking and non-smoking areas on a public conveyance is as useful as having a urinating and a non-urinating section in a swimming pool.”

    I vividly remember reading an article in the KLM version of the Holland Herald whilst on a DC-9 flight to Glasgow , and being mightily impressed by the explanation of the airflow/conditioning systems on their newly refurbished DC-9’s that split smokers and non-smokers on either side of the aircraft . If memory serves , the non smoking side was the right hand side with 2 seats as opposed to the 3 seats on the left.

    The illustration of the blue clean air on the right side as opposed to the grey murky dark left side was probably what made it so vivid, and was possibly a contributing factor in me never ever lighting up

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    christopheL
    Participant

    When in Rome do as the Romans do
    The problem is that most of us do not know what romans do and/or are upset with what romans do.

    This can be duplicated over and over again !!!

    Chacun voit midi à sa porte.

    This is a French proverb with no British equivalent

    It means that every individual is occupied, first and foremost, with his or her own personal interests, and each feels their subjective opinions as objective truths.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    traveldoc1
    Participant

    My first flight with Lufthansa (1983??) also had smoking on one side of aisle and non-smoking on the other. Bizarre.


    cwoodward
    Participant

    In these days when non-smokers are a considerable majority of the diners in any hotel or restaurant in most parts of the world then any successful establishment will be properly managing the smoker / non-smoker situation or the will lose custom.
    If the outdoor area is of a decent size then it makes perfect sense to have a specified area for smokers. In Asia have seen fans used to prevent unwanted smoke drifting to the non-smoking areas. Properly installed and directed air conditioning can also be used in indoor spaces
    In any semi enclosed areas particularly those with a roof smoking should not be allowed as it will without question cause nuisance to every non smoker.

    As others have mentioned it is a matter of consideration and common sense by both customers and in my view to a much greater degree by management who with proper hospitality training and awareness can easily engineer a dining environment where all customers are happy and comfortable.
    Its not exactly rocket science after all.

    I no longer smoke having given it up some 45 years ago when I was playing professional squash but smokers should be tolerated,welcomed and not treated as social outcasts as I have increasingly observed happening. I find smug sanctimonious non-smokers more annoying than the chap that enjoys a quiet puff – a long as he is not sitting next to me over dinner of course.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    Swissdiver
    Participant

    This is another exemple of rules that cannot replace upbringing. While inside, only banning makes sense, outside, both smokers and non-smokers can cohabit, provided some basic rules are respected (waiting, looking where your smoke goes, changing seats if needed, …). And this does not depend on the hotel brand or location.
    (I don’t smoke cigarettes, and never did, but do enjoy cigars)

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    Good news for those who want to enjoy their air and food unpolluted by burning tobacco :

    Smoking will be banned on the outside terraces of bars and restaurants in the streets of Catalonia, if the region’s health authority plans to bolster its laws pass.

    The ban could be in place before the end of the year as part of efforts to end smoking in crowded areas in the region which boasts Barcelona as its capital.

    Open-air sports facilities, cars and bus stops will also be affected if the authority decides to add to the January 2011 law that banned smoking inside bars and restaurants, the Guardian has reported.

    Catalunya was the second Spanish autonomous region to ban bull-torturing, they are not afraid to take a lead.


    esselle
    Participant

    Whilst they continue to try and become autonomous…….


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Independent, esselle, they already are autonomous.

    Spain has 17 autonomous regions (and two autonomous cities) in the sense that they have local government but ultimately depend on the Madrid central governments in national affairs. Catalunya is seeking independence from Madrid, and breaking away from the Spanish state.

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