Revealed – initial routes for BA's densified LGW B777-200s

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  capetonianm 6 Sep 2017
at 11:55
.

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  • AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Initial set of routes for BA’s densified B777-200s appear on Routesonline.com

    The first routes are mainly to leisure destinations but the daily LGW-JFK service receives the 10-across Y B777-200 from July 8.

    However I must stress that this information is based on advance schedules and everything is subject to change.

    http://www.routesonline.com/news/38/airlineroute/274586/british-airways-outlines-london-gatwick-hd-777-200er-routes-in-s18/


    openfly
    Participant

    How awful. Soon to be followed by “Operation Squeeze” on all the short-haul aircraft in economy AND Club Europe!


    wowzimmer
    Participant

    Oh, how awful indeed. You wouldn’t catch a Middle East airline doing that – oh no, wait. EK, EY and QR all have 3-4-3 in economy class on their 777’s. How about North America, surely not. Nope, AA and UA have a 3-4-3 config. But maybe, BA is the first airline in Europe – you’d be wrong. KLM went 3-4-3 in 2015. Even Cathay are doing the same thing. I’m not averse to calling out BA but this is hardly an example of them leading the race to the bottom – rather, they’re competing (especially at LGW where the loco’s are making a dent in their market share). I’m not saying it’s right or fair but the ensuing mock disgust at BA isn’t based in reality.


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    A couple of questions that I am sure someone will know the answers to…

    1. In real inches or cm’s, what effect does the extra seat have on passengers, i.e. how much width will passengers loose?

    2. Is there a maximum number of seats across that a twin aisled aircraft or even a single aisle aircraft is allowed to have? Is it possible for airlines to move to 11 across a twin aisle and 7 across in a single aisle?

    3. At what point will an extra crew member be required?


    Flightlevel
    Participant

    Definitely unitially to compete with LCCs and charter operations and Airbus propose 11 accross A380s, not yet ordered.
    QF is going the other way increasing economy plus seats on their A380s. The future for very long haul maybe?


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Martyn – There are no simple answers.

    1. Aisle width also plays a role. Carriers can narrow the aisle to allow for wider seats. Armrest width can be narrowed … as we see with the proposed 11-across A380. Staircases can be redesigned.

    See pieces we published previously.

    Eleven-across A380 moves a step closer

    Airbus unveils A380 “cabin space optimisation” range

    2. Depends on a variety of factors such as aircraft range, safety, take off weight and so on. Air Austral proposed operating an 840-seat all-Y A380. The order was placed with Airbus but subsequently cancelled. MAS proposes 635/720 seat A380s for its pilgrim charters.

    Malaysia Airlines boss believes airlines have “missed the point” of the A380 superjumbo

    One seat manufacturer has developed 7-across seating on a narrow body aircraft but no airline has ordered it so far and, in any case, it would need approval from the aviation bodies.

    3. Depends on aircraft type.


    Ah,Mr.Bond
    Participant

    @wowzimmer – you may be correct, but the fact is BA are putting 3-4-3 on their smaller 20 y/o beat up 777-200 series, not 300ers as others use. I would not pay a penny to get on one, sorry.


    philsquares
    Participant

    A couple of questions that I am sure someone will know the answers to…

    2. Is there a maximum number of seats across that a twin aisled aircraft or even a single aisle aircraft is allowed to have?
    3. At what point will an extra crew member be required?

    First point, the maximum capacity of an aircraft is determined by the ability to evacuate all the passengers using 50% of the doors in 90 seconds. For example, the 777-300ER maximum seating capacity. If Boeing were to develop some magic way of increasing the seating, the aircraft would have to be re-certified for that number.

    The rule of thumb is one Flight Attendant for each 50 seats (not passengers boarded). There are a myriad of exceptions to that, but the 50:1 is the start. Minimum number is 50. So an aircraft with 51 seats and 34 passengers would need 2 F/As.


    AlanOrton1
    Participant

    @wowzimmer – you may be correct, but the fact is BA are putting 3-4-3 on their smaller 20 y/o beat up 777-200 series, not 300ers as others use. I would not pay a penny to get on one, sorry.

    EK, EY, AC, AA, KL & NZ etc already operate 10 across 777-200 aircraft.


    traveldoc1
    Participant

    Re the A380 “cabin space optimisation” – several times recently I’ve had to enter and exit the top deck of an EK A380 via the front stairway. This would be a real challenge if it’s narrowed in any way.


    canucklad
    Participant

    Here’s a link for all those airlines who insist on stretching the manufacturers recommended configuration, including the much hyped ME3

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/farm-animal-welfare-during-transportation

    On a personal note, I was really disappointed when I lost my 787 Dreamliner virginity. Far from having lavish fun with space to spare high up in the clouds, I was left leaving underwhelmed, bush whacked and generally feeling cheap!!


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Does anyone know if they’ll be using it on LGW-CPT in the (southern hemisphere) summer.

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