Question mark hangs over Monarch as Qatar Airways A320s arrive in London.

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This topic contains 59 replies, has 28 voices, and was last updated by  Tom Otley 11 Oct 2017
at 17:03
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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 63 total)

  • LuganoPirate
    Participant

    MAEL is presumably owned by Monarch, and as it’s very much a profitable and going concern, I imagine it will be sold off. I wonder who will buy it?


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    Why cant the liquidator / administrator use Monarch’s assets and claim money back from who ever is funding the repatriation of trapped passengers? They have the pilots / staff / aircraft…………..

    Very good point Martyn. The only reason I can think of, is they are afraid the aircraft will be impounded to pay landing fees, local wages etc.


    esselle
    Participant

    I would expect the aircraft to be leased rather than owned, meaning they will be a liability (rather than assets)until someone else takes over the leases.


    SimonS1
    Participant

    I would expect the aircraft to be leased rather than owned, meaning they will be a liability (rather than assets)until someone else takes over the leases.

    All their fleet is leased, for sure. However I would have thought that in the current market there would be demand and the aircraft will find a new home.


    SimonS1
    Participant

    Why cant the liquidator / administrator use Monarch’s assets and claim money back from who ever is funding the repatriation of trapped passengers? They have the pilots / staff / aircraft…………..

    Question was asked on the TV last night.

    It’s because the administrators KPMG don’t have an AOC and are not allowed by the CAA to operate aircraft. However the aircraft remain assets of the administration and cannot be operated by another airline so the fleet has to remain grounded until either the leases are terminated or aircraft sub leased. That is also why the airline was shut down at 4am yesterday, this was the first moment when there were no Monarch aircraft in the sky and everything could be grounded.


    Poshgirl58
    Participant

    Local media reports that MAEL at BHX is operating normally.

    The local spotters blog reported arrival of VS 787-9, G-VNEW on Saturday evening. It was on FR24 yesterday as still at BHX, but no sign yet today. Could be in the hangar, as there’s no indication of its return to LHR.


    AnthonyDunn
    Participant

    This reply has been reported for inappropriate content.

    I have a degree of sympathy with the CEO of Monarch, interviewed this morning on BBC R4 “Today” programme when he pointed out that both Alitalia and Air Berlin have been supported (in the former case, repeatedly) by both their legal/bankruptcy systems and then by their respective governments. But, as is customary in the UK, no bailouts or government assistance – unless you are in the “too big to fail” banking sector, that is. The contrast with the US, whereby all of the major US airlines have been allowed to continue operating whilst restructuring under Chapter 11 protection, is also apposite.

    It was pointed out by the CEO that Monarch had been particularly badly impacted by terrorism in Turkey and Tunisia and the resulting glut of supply into the Balearics which had translated to prices falling some 25% on the previous year. He added that the airline had taken a substantial hit to its bottom line following the collapse in the value of Sterling against the greenback. Consequently, Monarch can also be legitimately described as a very visible victim of the Brex**it vote to commit economic suicide. Plenty more jobs to be lost before the electorate realises that the UKIPTories have every intention of making them poorer in order to satisfy the latter’s neuralgic obsession with leaving the EU.


    SimonS1
    Participant

    I’m sure Brexit didn’t help, but Monarch was on the ropes even before the vote and came close to losing its license a year ago.

    Fair point about Chapter 11 too. In the UK we seem to prefer the pre-packed administration where companies just walk away from their debts.


    canucklad
    Participant

    Sorry AD, I don’t see your Brexit argument at all.
    Sadly we’ve lost a good airline in Monarch, presumably because there is no votes in supporting and saving it.
    But in the same comment, you mention a German company and an Italian basket case, surely their downfall must be down to Brexit too?
    And what about AF and how it’s allowed to operate? Brexit ?

    Plus, you could argue that Turkey ,Egypt and other North African countries problems have been compounded by the EU’s dogmatic liberal foreign policies, and consequently their huge drop in tourism from the UK…or put it another way—Monarch’s bread and butter!

    And lets not forget how many businesses have disappeared since we joined the EEC !
    Blaming Brexit, is just to simplistic, and allows for shabby management to find an easy way out.


    thecartoonman
    Participant

    @canucklad – I agree with you completely.

    @ AD ‘Consequently, Monarch can also be legitimately described as a very visible victim of the Brex**it vote to commit economic suicide. Plenty more jobs to be lost before the electorate realises that the UKIPTories have every intention of making them poorer in order to satisfy the latter’s neuralgic obsession with leaving the EU.’

    Pretty sure this could have been written by Polly Toynbee in the Guardian, who on The Daily Politics mentioned Monarch’s demise was down to Brexit, this from a supposedly serious journalist, hopeless.


    Bath_VIP
    Participant

    I’m sorry to see Monarch disappear. Apparently they were founded in 1968 (year I was born) and have been the longest continuous brand name in UK aviation. Now they are gone, I think British Airways is the longest continuous brand name?

    Admittedly Loganair and Aurigny have been around longer but Loganair spent many years under a franchise rather than using their brand name (which they are now doing) and Alderney is technically not part of the UK!


    AlanOrton1
    Participant

    @thecartoonman – Maybe Anthony is Polly’s alter ego?!
    It was good of her to drag herself away from her Tuscan (or is it Umbrian) villa, to dispense her pearls of wisdom to the great unwashed.

    I hope the staff are able to find new jobs. I have the most sympathy for them.


    FaroFlyer
    Participant

    I am also sorry to see Monarch go, although it was more or less inevitable. My other favourite is Air Berlin. Both offered a high standard of service which was too high for the prices they could charge.

    Everyone that I have spoken to takes the view that it was good while it lasted, but too good to last. Monarch offered Gold card holders extra leg room seats, and priority boarding, at no charge, and you only needed 16 sectors to achieve gold. Most of their Gold cards are / were probably commuting to second homes and were flexible with dates, so could easily earn Gold status. In a couple of years I have spent €60 or €100 on a return flight just to renew Gold, and I know many people who did the same. Extra leg-room seats cost ~ €28 per sector so there was an almost instant return.

    Not only did you get the seats and PB but you also earned miles for free flights, and could change 1 or 2 flights a year without charge.

    I have an AB flight next week. It will be interesting to see if my BA Gold card still gets me priority boarding, and a Gold card welcome.


    PhilipHart
    Participant

    This reply has been reported for inappropriate content.

    In a year of stiff competition, the Nobel Prize for Nitwittery goes to …..

    @AnthonyDunn

    The judges came across many fine examples of Nitwittery, but ultimately could find no better example of a non-sequitur than – “Monarch can also be legitimately described as a very visible victim of the Brex**it vote to commit economic suicide. Plenty more jobs to be lost before the electorate realises that the UKIPTories have every intention of making them poorer in order to satisfy the latter’s neuralgic obsession with leaving the EU.”

    The prize, a detailed and fully-working model of the Manneken Pis, will be presented by Jean-Claude Drunker at Le Cafe Des Fadas on Rue du Matelot, Brussels on 1st April 2018.

    A very well-deserved award, I must say.

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