Please do not come to Cape Town…..

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This topic contains 63 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  LuganoPirate 4 May 2018
at 13:04
.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 64 total)

  • JPNU
    Participant

    I have lived in the Middle East for many years with never any water restrictions.

    That is a part of the world that would really benefit from water restrictions. I am always shocked at how much is wasted on beautiful, green gardens with fountains. You would think municipalities would at least try to use desert friendly plants but no……imported grasses and palms, shrubs that demand daily watering, the list goes on.

    There are very, very few mosques that recycle their grey water that has been used for ablutions – could be perfect for watering those plants mentioned above. Huge amounts of water are wasted on ablutions in any case. They can be performed with sand (yes, washing with sand before praying is permissible). And their is no excuse for allowing excess water to run down the streets when the call to prayer sounds. I used to have to jump puddles on the way to my apartment at prayer time.

    Then there is the poorly designed, installed and maintained infrastructure that allows massive water wastage from broken pipes and fairly regular water cuts for residents.

    Water is not valued in the Gulf yet and one day they will have to face the consequences.

    Sorry, folks. That rant is courtesy of my professional background and hobby horse intersecting.


    SimonS1
    Participant

    I have just read the article on Lufthansa’s new livery. Launched in Cape Town.
    Wonder how many LH staff and media brought in for that event that could of been hosted elsewhere.

    It wouldn’t be that the event was planned many months or even years in advance, and cancelling at short notice would have been very expensive and impacted many local businesses who rely on such events?

    One of the less sensible interventions of recent times I would suggest.

    Still of course it’s for the rest of the world to adapt, including also tourists who may have booked their holiday of a life time many months out and now appear unwanted.

    As a regular business visitor to SA it really is sad to see how the country has descended to junk status (or joke status perhaps).


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Sadly, it was inevitable that the infrastructure would decline when the third world thieves and thugs took over. In some ways, it is remarkable that much of it is still good.


    openfly
    Participant

    CNN showed an excellent 10 minute article this morning on the CT drought and the forthcoming consequences …. presented by someone with the surname Van Dam! Appropriate….


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    It must also be considered that the majority of tourists to CT are either on packages, non refundable flights, and have prepaid hotels and rental cars on non refundable rates. This could amount to over £8,000 for a family of four. Not many would be willing to lose that amount for what is to them a local problem!


    openfly
    Participant

    LP you are so right. But the message has to get through that, if there is just a little rain over the next few months, they cannot moan when there is no water for drinking, washing, restaurants closed, no laundry facilities…dirty sheets etc, unflushed loos, no fresh veg, a poor grape harvest….and lots of smelly bodies. I gather that it is proving difficult aleady to find bottled water. There is so much stock-piling going on that a water black-market has sprung up with unimaginable prices. My neighbours and I are stockpiling sea water to flush the loo.
    All very sad…and unpleasant.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    I have read that tourists use only 1% of the water that is consumed. I cannot vouch for that figure.

    Personally I am against increasing tourist numbers, there are already too many, but I realise that my point of view will not be shared by the many people whose livelihood depends on tourist income.


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    What makes things worse are the number of water leaks with water just gushing out into the streets. This really angers the local population.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Yes, there were two big bursts in the last ten days or so, one in Rondebosch which apparently lasted the entire day, and another in Sea Point High Level Road which lasted about 5 hours.


    openfly
    Participant

    A little bit of good news….somebody has magically found another months worth of dam water. The Zero went back to mid-May yesterday. I wonder who will take the credit for that?!


    capetonianm
    Participant

    What happened is that a lot of water in farm dams was released into the Palmiet River system and will find its way into one of the reservoirs, Steenbras Upper I think. It’s not a solution by any means but it’s a significant step.


    bluemooner
    Participant

    I have read that tourists use only 1% of the water that is consumed. I cannot vouch for that figure.
    Personally I am against increasing tourist numbers, there are already too many, but I realise that my point of view will not be shared by the many people whose livelihood depends on tourist income.

    Annual visit to S Africa next month, we were planning on a week in the Western Cape, but will go to the Natal Drakensberg instead and stay in Durban for the rest of our stay. Thanks for the ongoing advice.


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    What happened is that a lot of water in farm dams was released into the Palmiet River system and will find its way into one of the reservoirs, Steenbras Upper I think. It’s not a solution by any means but it’s a significant step.

    I believe the Upper Steenbras reservoir has to be kept filled, hence why it’s currently at 85%, in order to provide Eskom with power. This then drains into other dams and onwards for use. I understand the farmers were ordered to release the water. Still no rain on the horizon for Cape Town though.


    Marc_ACB
    Participant

    I have read that tourists use only 1% of the water that is consumed. I cannot vouch for that figure. Personally I am against increasing tourist numbers, there are already too many, but I realise that my point of view will not be shared by the many people whose livelihood depends on tourist income.

    Annual visit to S Africa next month, we were planning on a week in the Western Cape, but will go to the Natal Drakensberg instead and stay in Durban for the rest of our stay. Thanks for the ongoing advice.

    As a Durban boy (now living in London) but with family still in the KZN Midlands and the Drakensberg, or as you may hear “uKhahlamba” let me know if you need recommendations for an awesome restaurant/hotel.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    D0 has just been extended to 04JUN, however although that is very promising and good news, there is no reason for complacency and I hope that consumers are not going to take this as a sign that they can relax their water saving efforts.

    I have just booked a rental car in CPT for next week and as soon as you request the car types, a pop-up box tells you that due to the water shortage, the outsides of cars are not being washed.

    The even better news is that Zuma seems to be getting closer to being kicked into the garbage can of history, where he should have gone long ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 64 total)
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