Passengers booted off for ignoring safety video

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This topic contains 25 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  canucklad 10 May 2019
at 12:55
.

Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)

  • rferguson
    Participant

    I would ensure that everyone that wants to watch it has the ability to do so

    Once again the issue of removing bags in an emergency evacuation (Moscow this week) has been highlighted and based on the above comment a passenger could turn round after the event and claim “I didn’t know”.

    I think it is important that every passenger is made aware of all parts of the safety briefing, especially, do not remove bags in the event of an emergency evacuation. If it can be proven the additional time it took for a passenger to selfishly include his bag in the event of an evacuation, caused an additional death, the passenger ought to be prosecuted.

    Sadly, it is not the fault of cabin crew (and I am very respectfully to rferguson on this point), but as has previously been said, until the airlines provide the authority and support to cabin crew to ensure safety briefings are taken more seriously, nothing will change..

    It’s incredibly sad to see the video footage of people with their hand baggage evacuating the Aeroflot aircraft. This was also a factor in the evacuation of the BA 747 on stand in LAS a few years ago.

    I think it will continue to be an issue until one of two things happen (or both) –
    1 – equip aircraft with overhead lockers that are centrally locked during taxi, take off and landing. I can’t see this happening as it would increase costs to the manufacturers and airlines. And anyway would take decades to enforce.
    2 – introduce legislation that makes impeding an evacuation by removing your personal items an offence punishable by a large fine.

    Thankfully i’ve never had to evacuate a blazing inferno on a plane but I remember a training session years ago that involved a psychologist that specialised in peoples reactions in disasters. Most will react, grasp the severity of the situation and follow commands. Some will do the opposite – they will sit there, frozen. And some will revert to ‘known behaviour’. They will block out the severity of the incident ‘this cannot be happening to me’ and do silly things like get their baggage.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    stevescoots
    Participant

    I admit i take no notice of them as i have seen them all so often, however i do make point of taking off any headphones and not reading, so at least it seems i am taking note! i also have a process, check nearest exits. passport, wallet and phone on me at all times. shoes on until seatbelt sign off. In an emergency you better not go for a bag or i am going through you as i am down that chute back to the terminal to call loved ones and book a hotel/flight home while the tail end charlies are still getting off, because i plan for it!


    stevescoots
    Participant

    I would ensure that everyone that wants to watch it has the ability to do so

    Once again the issue of removing bags in an emergency evacuation (Moscow this week) has been highlighted and based on the above comment a passenger could turn round after the event and claim “I didn’t know”.

    I think it is important that every passenger is made aware of all parts of the safety briefing, especially, do not remove bags in the event of an emergency evacuation. If it can be proven the additional time it took for a passenger to selfishly include his bag in the event of an evacuation, caused an additional death, the passenger ought to be prosecuted.

    Sadly, it is not the fault of cabin crew (and I am very respectfully to rferguson on this point), but as has previously been said, until the airlines provide the authority and support to cabin crew to ensure safety briefings are taken more seriously, nothing will change..

    It’s incredibly sad to see the video footage of people with their hand baggage evacuating the Aeroflot aircraft. This was also a factor in the evacuation of the BA 747 on stand in LAS a few years ago.

    I think it will continue to be an issue until one of two things happen (or both) –

    1 – equip aircraft with overhead lockers that are centrally locked during taxi, take off and landing. I can’t see this happening as it would increase costs to the manufacturers and airlines. And anyway would take decades to enforce.

    2 – introduce legislation that makes impeding an evacuation by removing your personal items an offence punishable by a large fine.

    Thankfully i’ve never had to evacuate a blazing inferno on a plane but I remember a training session years ago that involved a psychologist that specialised in peoples reactions in disasters. Most will react, grasp the severity of the situation and follow commands. Some will do the opposite – they will sit there, frozen. And some will revert to ‘known behaviour’. They will block out the severity of the incident ‘this cannot be happening to me’ and do silly things like get their baggage.

    Frozen seems to be the main thing, some years ago 30 mins after take off from HKG on BA all the masks dropped down, i grabbed mine and put it on strait away, looking round the cabin i would say 90% of CW passengers just sat there bewildered until an announcement came over about 2 minutes later saying it was a fault. if it was a real emergency chances are most would have passed out


    BPP
    Participant

    The anti social use of mobile phones is becomming a real nuisance. Does anybody know of a discreet, portable, very short range – 5 metres max (and probbably illegal!) electronic gadget that will ‘scramble’ the reception of a mobile phone when pointed at it?

    BPP


    GivingupBA
    Participant

    Frozen seems to be the main thing… 90% of CW passengers just sat there bewildered…

    And talking about freezing in emergencies, and cabin staff, I never forget Barbara Harrison who died in a fiercely burning BOAC jet on the tarmac at Heathrow aged 22 in 1968. She elected to stay on the plane to help passengers get off. She gave her life for passengers and should never be forgotten.


    Rockhopper
    Participant

    Slight thread drift but if you want to watch a safety video that will really make you cringe with its awfulness try this one:

    IOM Steampacket safety video

    Have to put up with it every time we use the fast craft ferry…..


    canucklad
    Participant

    his was also a factor in the evacuation of the BA 747 on stand in LAS a few years ago.

    1 – equip aircraft with overhead lockers that are centrally locked during taxi, take off and landing. I can’t see this happening as it would increase costs to the manufacturers and airlines. And anyway would take decades to enforce.

    It’s hard to tell how any of would react after being involved in an incident like the tragedy at Moscow.
    I remember the National Geographic documentary about the Hudson ditching.
    It told the real story from the passengers perspective.
    All sorts of positive and worryingly negative behaviours were demonstrated during the evacuation.
    Memorably, one women became hysterical and not only put herself at risk but fellow passengers also.

    In her defence, the airline had separated her from her children !!
    I wonder if there’s a safety lesson to be learnt there.?

    The locking of overheads once taxing and on final descent is a no brainer, but you’re right.
    Airlines saving a penny or two takes precedence over our lives.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    cwoodward
    Participant

    I totally agree with rfergusons intelligent realistic approach and views. Personally I feel that the numerous attempts to make the safety video funny or ‘interesting’ has tended to trivialise the importance of the safety demonstration with the result being the reverse of what was intended with now less rather than more passengers paying attention.
    There is I feel a strong case to revert to the old style of safety demonstration where the cabin crew do a manual demonstration and the ISM (or equivalent) does the commentary.This perhaps augmented by a silent background video.
    I am certain that the style of manual demonstration commanded much more attention than is currently the norm and often the attention of almost all when inexperienced crew member stumbled through the announcement.
    A high percentage of my flights are with the same airline, the same 3 models of aircraft and often the within a row or two the same seat. Normally I am reading a newspaper at the time of the safety demonstration and I must confess that most times I do not watch all of the safety demonstration but I do pay attention to the the important parts and refresh my memory as to the location of the exits and emergency lighting also noting how many passengers are seated in my part of the cabin. When flying with other airlines I do pay considerably more attention to the demonstration

    Perhaps the problem of luggage in an emergency situation could be solved by by designing the bins so that they could be centrally locked as needed. This should not be difficult to design-in to new aircraft

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    esselle
    Participant

    I was taking a BA flight many years ago and the Captain, in his pre pushback welcome, advised that there would be a safety briefing, during which he said”….if my family were on board today I would insist they gave it their full attention, and I ask you to do the same”.

    It really did seem to have the desired effect.


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    My routine is the same regardless of aircraft type…..

    • Shoes on till the ping
    • Wallet, phone and passport on my person
    • Nearest and 2nd closest exit (rows away counted)
    • Vulnerable fellow passengers noted
    • Headrest checked

    I’m the same Canucklad, though I don’t check the headrest. Not sure why I should to be honest. Is there a good reason for doing so?

    Kulula in S. Africa are know for their witty announcements, and on a couple of occasions I’ve heard crew say before the briefing, “and please stop talking or reading and listen to this important safety briefing, and that includes you in Row 13”. Of course everyone turns to look at row 13 before it dawns on them there is no row 13. Laughter then follows and they do listen. Mostly!

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    canucklad
    Participant

    Of course everyone turns to look at row 13 before it dawns on them there is no row 13

    Love it LP, a brilliant example of thinking out of the box .

    Headrest = inhaling smoke protector

    Again with a bit of thought and cleverness , headrests could be designed in such as manner to double up as make shift smoke hoods !!

    2 users thanked author for this post.
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