Olympic Air – Aegean Airlines

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Potakas 24 Jan 2011
at 23:36
.

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  • Anonymous

    Potakas
    Participant

    ”The case of the merger of two private Greek airliners, Olympic and Aegean is on the spotlight again as the European Commission has to decide, this week whether such merger is possible or not.

    Almost a year ago, the boards of the two airlines agreed a merger. As we reported at the time, the establishment of such a brokered agreement between Olympic and Aegean risks resulting in an infringement to national and community competition rules since it could create a dominant position and subsequent abuse of the Greek domestic air transport market.

    The Commission expected a final decision by 7 December 2010.

    Carry On As Normal
    The decision was postponed until 12 January, 2011 and again to 2 February, 2011. Part of the reason for the delay was that there was high level pressure being applied, by those who wanted the deal to go ahead. The airlines are owned by the Vassilakis Group of companies (Aegean) and Marfin Investment Group (Olympic). The pressure, however, according to rumors comes only from Olympic because between the two, it is the one who is facing serious problems as if the merger is not allowed they will be obliged to proceed with capital increase.

    These groups are also involved with shipping and have considerable lobbying skills and from the Greek shipping community of London, where from, according to rumors, the pressure on Brussels originates from. One example of how powerful Greek ship-owners are is the exemption from carbon emissions taxes for the maritime industry. Currently the tax negotiations have been passed to the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), who spent five years on the issue, without any progress. None is expected.

    As to the merger of the two airliners, during this period, something unusual happened; the two companies acted as though the blessing of the Commission was a mere formality and made preparations for the post merger situation.

    One example is the dismissal of up to 40 Olympic pilots. According to insiders, they were called in to the Flight Operations Manager’s office, where a lady from HR was also present, informed that their services are not needed any more and handed an envelope with their finishing salary.

    Dismissed engineers are rumored to have extracted their revenge by destroying the logs and maintenance records of four A340 planes. Without these records, the planes are, in effect, unusable.
    Commissioner Joaquin Almunia said in October 2010, “The big difficulty here is that the two companies hold almost all the domestic market in Greece,” Almunia added, “As with previous airline cases, we will need to ensure that consolidation in the airline sector does not happen to the detriment of consumers and businesses in Europe.”

    Previously, the Commission disallowed a merger between Air Lingus and Ryan Air on competition grounds. There were some other factors involved, not least that the Irish government was opposed to the deal and the… abrasive character of the Ryan Air boss, who misses no opportunity to show his contempt for customers.

    The case against the Greek merger is far stronger.

    Airline experts pointed out that Aegean and Olympic Air are already the two leading airlines at Athens airport. Merging the two would give the combined entity between 65% and 70% of all flights and seats at the airport.

    EU Competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia, who has set a Feb. 2 deadline for a decision, is expected to announce on Jan. 26 that he will prohibit the deal.

    However, the same source said that if the companies came up with further last-minute remedies, there was still the possibility of the merger receiving EU approval.”

    In the case that the EU declines the merge of those two airliners, Olympic is expected to join an alliance, probably Skyteam as they have many codeshare flights with Delta and they serve many airports such as LHR from ST’s terminals.

    Although, now that IAG has been created and they want to acquire other carriers, Olympic is seeking for ”money” so maybe they could be the next.

    Olympic offers premium in flight experience, although they suffer on ground products (lounges) and Customer Relations, the most attractive on them is that they have slots to many US , Asian and Australia routes.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSLNE70K02920110121

    http://www.businesstraveller.com/news/olympic-air-and-aegean-to-merge

    http://www.neurope.eu/articles/104296.php


    SimonRowberry
    Participant

    Hi Potakas,

    The merger of two private Greek airliners would indeed be in the spotlight!

    Sorry – I couldn’t resist that!

    I’m about to enjoy a serious cigar – email of thanks on its way to you shortly!

    Kindest regards,

    Simon


    Potakas
    Participant

    Unfortunately this is correct , actually it is a shame that the Greek Government gave them the green light initially.

    Some Cigar reviews.

    http://www.cigars-review.org/Montecristo-Sublimes-EL-2008.htm

    http://www.cigars-review.org/Cohiba-Piramides-LE-2006.htm

    Enjoy!

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