Nut Allergy

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This topic contains 53 replies, has 31 voices, and was last updated by  MartynSinclair 15 Nov 2019
at 08:22
.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 54 total)

  • LaundryMan
    Participant

    Recently flew BA to SFO in First and back to Heathrow from LAC in J on BA

    Crew were excellent on both flights and was made welcome – no issues

    However as part of the pre take off welcome they indicated that there was someone on board with a severe nut allergy and the crew would appreciate if no one ate any nuts

    I found it strange that this announcement was on both flights and was just wondering if anyone else has heard this on BA ?

    Or is this now a standard comment on all BA long haul flights to stop people eating peanuts ?

    Would be interested in views


    Swissdiver
    Participant

    I had a similar experience, in a short haul flight though. While I recognise someone can have severe allergy, I wonder to what extent 200 pax should endure it…

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    cwoodward
    Participant

    While of course ‘nut allergies’ are indeed very serious it seems very OTT to stop serving nuts interialy. I can’t imagine a Michelin Star restaurant changing their menu because one customer has a ‘nut allergy’.
    Surely it must be incumbent on the passenger concerned to properly manage this illness rather the airline or restaurant.

    These episodes seem to me to be a gross overreaction by the cabin crew (who have less work if nuts normally served are not) or perhaps cost saving by BA or a timid crew being intimidated by the nut allergic passenger.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    TominScotland
    Participant

    While of course ‘nut allergies’ are indeed very serious it seems very OTT to stop serving nuts interialy. I can’t imagine a Michelin Star restaurant changing their menu because one customer has a ‘nut allergy’.
    Surely it must be incumbent on the passenger concerned to properly manage this illness rather the airline or restaurant.

    These episodes seem to me to be a gross overreaction by the cabin crew (who have less work if nuts normally served are not) or perhaps cost saving by BA or a timid crew being intimidated by the nut allergic passenger.

    cwoodward, to put a unwillingness to serve nuts down to crew laziness is, to put it mildly, bizarre. IMHO, not serving nuts is a very sensible precaution if there is a risk that a passenger will be affected. Nut allergies are, potentially, fatal. How can those affected manage the air circulation systems in an aircraft? Are you saying that people affected should not fly at all so that others passengers can enjoy their peanuts?

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    I suspect there may be other allergies just as severe (shellfish?) which are not treated in the same way. I suppose the answer to this is perhaps that dust from nuts may circulate, whereas this would not apply with other foodstuffs.


    esselle
    Participant

    Somebody with a severe nut allergy would in normal circumstances advise crew of this fact. Once they have done so, the crew have little choice but to announce it and take precautions which will have been mandated as a protocol by the carrier.

    To suggest it is a lazy response is a bit naïve. By the way how do you “properly manage” such an allergy?

    In nearly 40 years of flying around the world, I can count the number of times I have heard this announcement on the fingers of one hand.

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    Swissdiver
    Participant

    Wouldn’t it be reasonable to ask the allergic passenger to wear a mask to be on the safe side, instead of annoying the whole plane?

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    Gin&Tonic
    Participant

    But the majority of restaurants will ask you if you have any allergies they should be aware of so they can ensure the safe preparation of your food.


    41fishmonger
    Participant

    Hi: My Husband and I fly a lot between Gatwick and Faro on BA. We hear this quite a few times during the year. I have a nut allergy so its always an anxious time – so I’m pleased to hear the announcement.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    cwoodward
    Participant

    The points that I made above I believe are very valid and I stand by them other than the ‘tongue in cheek remark’ re less work for the crew.

    ‘Swissdivers’ point I believe is well made if passengers are concerned re the ‘mythical” danger of any peanut ‘dust’ circulating in the air of passenger aircraft .

    I disagree with the point made by ‘esselle’ re a nut ban being ‘mandated as a protocol by the carrier.’ and consider it to be very unlikely to be the case. a
    Perhaps some airlines have this protocol but I know that 2 of Asia’s largest 5 star airlines do not nor do I believe that they should as such a protocol would be vastly disproportionate to the unproven and mythical risk.

    I have a sister with a nut allergy who flies reasonably often and know that she would be acutely embarrassed by the type of announcement that ‘LayndryMan mentioned to start this thread.
    ‘TominnScotland’ while I well understand your concerns I believe that they are misplaced as there are a myriad of studies that disprove the myth that you allude to and I cannot find anything of any scientific merit that supports the contention.
    Below are some fairly well resourced studies on the subject and BTW to be clear I am NOT saying that people with allergies should not fly.

    https://www.aaaai.org/ask-the- expert/peanut-air-travel
    https://mkfa.info/blog/peanuts-on-planes-the-myth-of-airborne-allergenshttps:
    //allergyfacts.org.au/images/pdf/airtravelnuts.pdf

    Of course this is not a trivial matter but I do see a deal of overreaction and a degree of anger that I don’t altogether understand re my post and apologize if my direct
    wording and little joke has offended.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    SimonS1
    Participant

    Well in 37 years of business travel, with an average of 35 flights a year, I have never heard this once. Then again I do my best to avoid BA so perhaps that might explain.

    Whilst there may not be a protocol or regulation on this I am sure airlines are aware of the potential for bad PR. Someone dies of a severe reaction and the media can dwell on it for a long time. Hence the ‘safety first’ response.

    As for managing the condition….how? Should the traveller charter their own plane to get from A to B? Sounds a bit of a selfish argument to me: really, can’t travellers go a few hours without eating nuts?

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    I am certainly not a medic, but I remember a similar announcement but this did not come with a blanket nut ban through out the aircraft. From memory, the passengers allergy was about peanuts, but as the drinks trolley were serving almonds, nuts were served with drinks, in the forward cabin anyway.

    Perhaps one of the forums medics could provide some clarity – if only to educate….

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    esselle
    Participant

    I don’t think I overreacted, and there was certainly no anger in my comment, but do wonder cwoodward if you have ever witnessed (as I have) somebody having a severe anaphylactic reaction?

    Rferguson may be able to advise on the “policy”, if there is one, at BA on such matters.


    cwoodward
    Participant

    SimonS1 wrote: ‘As for managing the condition….how?’
    To what condition do you refer please and against what exactly given that peanuts are not a problem on aircraft unless eaten ? The solution for which is rather obvious.

    ‘can’t travellers go a few hours without eating nuts?’
    I am trying to understand why they would need to do that, Perhaps you could enlighten.


    canucklad
    Participant

    Perhaps one of the forums medics could provide some clarity – if only to educate….

    Don’t get me started on nut allergies.
    Primarily because where do you start and where do you finish, or more precisely draw the line.
    People seem to suffer from a myriad of maladies these days, that just weren’t as much of an issue last century . Or if I was to be truthful, now seem to be dramatized into life threatening crises .

    Types of Soap, milk, shellfish, citrus fruit, deodorants, minerals in water, dust mites, types of material and on , and on, and on

    I’m not downplaying the danger to those people who are severely affected by the above allergies. And would happily not start munching nuts if I was sitting next to someone who might keel over by cross contamination.

    On the other hand I’m becoming increasingly irritated at being told as part of the majority at what I can and can’t do, or that matter think . All because a small minority demand equality.

    It’s incumbent on all of us to be respectful and show care to others, yet it’s also right that people take responsibility for themselves and minimise their maladies impact on others.

    Like Martyn, I am open to be educated by medical experts

    6 users thanked author for this post.
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