Noisy Young Child on Overnight BA flight ?

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This topic contains 72 replies, has 42 voices, and was last updated by  K1ngston 5 Jul 2019
at 03:53
.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 73 total)

  • MartynSinclair
    Participant

    Creating adult only business class areas or strictly enforced quiet / sleep zones is not for one minute suggesting children should be banned from premium class travel. On the contrary, perhaps airlines should consider children only areas on long haul flights.

    Whatever the discussion, I still hold the belief, really in any class, that passengers have the right to an undistributed nights sleep on a night flight. The example given of a child’s toy pinging throughout the night – surely cabin crew have the authority to ask the child parents to turn the sound off – even if the parent has to be woken up..

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    SimonS1
    Participant

    Creating adult only business class areas or strictly enforced quiet / sleep zones is not for one minute suggesting children should be banned from premium class travel. On the contrary, perhaps airlines should consider children only areas on long haul flights.

    Whatever the discussion, I still hold the belief, really in any class, that passengers have the right to an undistributed nights sleep on a night flight. The example given of a child’s toy pinging throughout the night – surely cabin crew have the authority to ask the child parents to turn the sound off – even if the parent has to be woken up..

    But in practice how would you create ‘adult only’ areas or quiet zones within the confines of an aircraft like a 777?

    I agree the crew should have authority etc etc, however what do you do when there is an issue at 40,000 feet?


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    Virgin offer (or used to offer) the snooze zone on half of the upper deck of the -400

    I accept the concept will only work where the cabins have sections. The 380 has 3 J class sections, the 787, two J class sections. 777, I have no idea as I avoid it.

    I do not think it is overly complicated for airlines to offer quiet zones …


    james
    Participant

    Sounds like people need to invest in some good noise cancelling headphones. Work for me…


    AFlyingDutchman
    Participant

    Being Gold with BA for one year, 10 years, or over 20 years like me has nothing to do with this issue. The main point is the parent should have taken responsibility for his/her annoying child, and controlled him/her, period. No one is blaming the child, its poor parenting, and should have been addressed from the start. The PC brigade go to far by wanting to avoid the simplest of facts, its the parent’s duty.

    7 users thanked author for this post.

    travelworld2
    Participant

    I really don’t see that the crew can do very much. This is the parents’ responsibility. If they are engrossed in the inflight entertainment I would tell them that their child is crying, and do so repeatedly. Babies do cry- it’s in their nature-but it’s the duty of parents to do all they can to ensure that others aren’t disturbed by that, especially in the confines of an aircraft cabin, which isn’t, after all, their own home. I have no problem with screaming children if the parents are apologetic and do all they can to try to stop the noise. I often see mums and dads take it in turns to carry their baby up and down the aircraft to encourage quiet. But putting on the noise cancelling headphones and letting the other passengers take the pain is simply inconsiderate and rude.

    Whilst I think it’s accepted wisdom that you shouldn’t rush to comfort your child at home when he or she cries (because it encourages dependence) that rule simply doesn’t apply on an aircraft and parents who think it does can be told firmly the contrary.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    SimonS1
    Participant

    Virgin offer (or used to offer) the snooze zone on half of the upper deck of the -400

    I accept the concept will only work where the cabins have sections. The 380 has 3 J class sections, the 787, two J class sections. 777, I have no idea as I avoid it.

    I do not think it is overly complicated for airlines to offer quiet zones …

    I can’t see it working I’m afraid.

    The 747 would have been ideal with the upstairs cabin, however that is being phased out and in any case the upper deck gets heavily booked by status members.

    In the other aircraft with a single deck, well noise carries and I’m not sure it would really solve the issue.

    Then you would have all the other issues – “the plane was changed and I was shifted from my quiet seat”, “I am a very important person but the airline wouldn’t accommodate me”, “I was sat at the back of the quiet cabin and could hear someone talking” etc etc.

    As we see this reported very rarely it doesn’t seem to be a big issue and I would be surprised if the airlines were interested in introducing another complication in their business model. There must after all be a reason why none of the major players has done it….


    CathayLoyalist2
    Participant

    Like most of us I have had my young/very young children with me from an early age and equally been on the receiving end of errant children. As a parent I made every effort when a situation arose that required me to “step up” and not simply bury my head in the tv screen. That is as much as anyone can do and at least other people are seeing that you are trying. Equally on the two occasions a child was causing a noise , one kicking the back of my seat and the other running up and down the cabin screaming. in both cases a polite but assertive ” Would you be ever so kind as to etc etc”. On both occasions it worked well. I am sure had I said “If you don´t get hold of your imbecilic moron I´ll shove him down the toilet” is likely to get a negative response.

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    w8ster
    Participant

    Like most of us I have had my young/very young children with me from an early age and equally been on the receiving end of errant children. As a parent I made every effort when a situation arose that required me to “step up” and not simply bury my head in the tv screen. That is as much as anyone can do and at least other people are seeing that you are trying. Equally on the two occasions a child was causing a noise , one kicking the back of my seat and the other running up and down the cabin screaming. in both cases a polite but assertive ” Would you be ever so kind as to etc etc”. On both occasions it worked well. I am sure had I said “If you don´t get hold of your imbecilic moron I´ll shove him down the toilet” is likely to get a negative response.

    Sadly not all parents are like you. Many parents don’t even try and any polite requests met with rude gestures. Full credit to you (and many travelling parents out there) for doing what you do though.

    My 2 cents of this, if the cabin crew is responsible for passengers safety AND comfort, they should hold some responsibility in at least making every effort to encourage the parents to be responsible and in met with resistance and the situation is out of control, report to the captain. Kids running around screaming is a safety issue and kids screaming out of control is a comfort issue..

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    SwissExPat
    Participant

    I now tend to generally accept that on overnight flights, I will automatically set myself up to sleep with a decent set of Ear Plugs and eyeshades etc on the assumption that there is a chance of some noise especially if there are Infants in the Cabin. I’ve simply adjusted my expectation downwards.

    I remember once being in F on BA A380 overnight and seated across the aisle from me was a Woman holding an infant with her Male Partner standing chatting and playing with the child before the doors closed. I feared the worst in terms of crying and noise etc (actually this did not happen as the infant slept through out the flight or was it simply my ear plugs). The memorable point (and I’m still not sure how to feel about it) was that when the doors closed, the Man/Husband bade his partner and kid farwell and disappeared into a different cabin (presume J or Y+)!!!


    Inquisitive
    Participant

    Totally agree with sflyer86. Parents are the problem, not the children in almost all situations like this.

    Due to my various assignments, I had to travel with family long haul – and during these times my children were from bassinet age to early teens. And we never had a bad situation. Many children cries during landings due to ear drum pains, but that is for a short time. During other times, some proactive planning and actions from parents can keep the children calm and quite.

    Even the suggestion to keep a separate area within business class will not solve the problem of brat child or incompetent parents. I have seen children making aisles as playground on long haul and parents were indulging in their acts.

    With people getting more rich, more families are travelling business class with children and this issue will continue unless parents acts properly.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    Susi80
    Participant

    Usually I stay away from product advertising, but so far only my Bose noise cancelling headphones have been my only help against screaming children (even sitting next to me!), they are a bliss and I can’t travel without them anymore. I’m hoping one day Richard Branson makes his vision true and will introduce “child class cabins”, same as Air India had planned as well, basically the last part of the plane with special doors to keep out the noise, and anyone who’s ever travelled to India probably knows about the kindergarten atmosphere on a 12 hour flight 😉


    TominScotland
    Participant

    SwissExPat – I was horrified to read your story. As other posters on this Forum will confirm, it is the male partner who is entitled to the seat in First, not his family. Shame on BA for permitting this.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    EU_Flyer
    Participant

    Seems this is a lose-lose situation. The BA crew had to respect that the child was a fare paying passenger but the parent clearky didn’t care to take responsibility themself.

    Perhaps the CSM could have been more sympathetic and explained that the child’s conduct was unfortunately beyond the crew’s control (having alredy raised it once with the mother). Personally I would have politely spoken with the mother and asked her to be conscious of her child’s behaviour.

    That said, kids are kids. And some kids fly Club. And some kids have Gold cards too. Having a sense of humour usually helps. And perfecting the silent death stare to the mother from the aisle might be something fatbear can work on?


    canucklad
    Participant

    it is the male partner who is entitled to the seat in First, not his family.

    Forgive my ignorance or lack of understanding ironic intent, but why ?

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 73 total)
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