New BA/Oneworld Baggage Rules

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This topic contains 100 replies, has 31 voices, and was last updated by  CathayLoyalist2 12 Jan 2017
at 09:41
.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 101 total)

  • TheRealBabushka
    Participant

    Travellator
    Participant

    So far this has been conjecture or supposition, have any posters or site visitors had this new enhancement applied to a recent journey.
    On a recent return on BA on 2 separate bookings from a regional to Asia my bags were interlined both ways.

    Departing the Regional I was asked if I had 2 separate bookings but this seemed to be an unfamiliarity with BA’s new computer system.


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    Travellator – 19/06/2016 07:09 BST

    With respect, this has not been ‘conjecture’, the policy has been changed and promulgated.

    http://www.britishairways.com/assets/pdfs/updates/oneworld-through-check-in.pdf

    We all know that BA can be inconsistent in its application of polices (e.g. boarding priority) and it does seem that people reporting so far are being accomodated, but that does not mean that this is going to continue.


    christopheL
    Participant

    The question is not wether these new rules may not be applied time to time. The question is : is there any risk I will be denied check-in my luggage all the way or not.
    I’m afraid the answer to this question is definitively yes which means that any one travelling with 2 different tickets will have to make sure there will be enough to time at the connection airport to apply this useless new procedure.


    Travellator
    Participant

    Still interested to see how rigidly this will be applied.
    If I currently have a journry with 2 different numbers can I phone exec club and get them unified ?


    christopheL
    Participant

    I would be surprised they will unify your tickets has it will mean that any passenger can escape the rule.


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    Travellator – 19/06/2016 09:52 BST

    The only way to find out is to call BA, anything is speculation.

    ChristopheL writes “The question is not wether these new rules may not be applied time to time. The question is : is there any risk I will be denied check-in my luggage all the way or not. I’m afraid the answer to this question is definitively yes which means that any one travelling with 2 different tickets will have to make sure there will be enough to time at the connection airport to apply this useless new procedure.”

    I agree with him and no doubt this is the point in changing the policy, it will cause extra hassle and the airlines hope it will drive people to buy more expensive tickets.


    canucklad
    Participant

    The question I’d ask is simply this ….

    What does the future look like for global airline alliances?
    With every passing day there seems to less cooperation between the airlines as they introduce insular fragmented policies.
    And One World at a quick glance seems to be unravelling faster than the other two. Especially when airlines create alliances within alliances.


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    Putting the other side of the argument, why should the airline have to check the bags through when travelling on 2 different tickets?

    Surely going on a journey with one ticket it is expected to have your bags checked through to the final destination – but you travelling on 2 separate bookings / tickets. why should the airline check the bag all the way through??

    Agree, it is nice and convenient is they did..

    When I use my ex-Europe routings on two different tickets and check luggage in, I have always made separate arrangements – would never expect an airline to take my bags all the way on different tickets..


    SimonS1
    Participant

    I believe the situation is different with ex EU – there are generally logistical issues such as not being able to tag twice through the same airport etc.

    However I can see that side of the argument, if you save money by booking separate tickets it comes with a trade off on flexibility. On the other hand there are some tickets you can’t combine.

    The bottom line for me is I still don’t understand why this is needed, is through checking like this problematic, or is it just a commercial measure to ‘encourage’ people to buy the through fare?


    Carajillo2Sugar
    Participant

    This is probably as simple as there being a cost element involved for the airline in the interlining of baggage. The airport authority supplies and maintains the baggage system and almost certainly charges the airline on a per-bag basis. This is why the airlines can offer a ‘hand-baggage-only’ fare that is cheaper than those which include a checked bag.

    So, along with investigations into the fuel surcharges (neatly renamed ‘carrier imposed surcharges’ to dodge the accusation of profiteering) and credit-card fees, now we also need an investigation into the actual cost of processing a bag from one flight to another.


    KeaneJohn
    Participant

    I believe one of the reasons cited on other forums is the cost of mishandled luggage. Bothe the first and last airline are sevrwLly liable for costs and in such cases the cost of the final carrier could be disproportionate.

    I’ve never connected unless on through tickets and have left a stupid amount of time to reclaim bags and check in again. It will not really affect me that much though I do have a MIA-LHR-DUB journey returning to LCY so a bit miffed if I can’t through check but not the end of the world


    nevereconomy
    Participant

    Just read a post elsewhere from AVIOS travellers in F from JNB with paid LHR-EDI ticket being denied through checked bags. I travel frequently to an AA US destination with no BA code share, so I guess I now have to use AA across the Atlantic or book AA codeshare on BA flight to get my bags checked through. A most peculiar rule when OW
    trumpets ‘seamless’ travel.


    nevereconomy
    Participant

    Just read a post elsewhere from AVIOS travellers in F from JNB with paid LHR-EDI ticket being denied through checked bags. I travel frequently to an AA US destination with no BA code share, so I guess I now have to use AA across the Atlantic or book AA codeshare on BA flight to get my bags checked through. A most peculiar rule when OW
    trumpets ‘seamless’ travel.


    CathayLoyalist2
    Participant

    Issues like this only add weight to my view that increasingly the alliances are primarily for the operational benefit of the airlines involved and if there is/are customer benefits spin attached, well aren’t we the lucky ones. This restriction is one of a continuous stream of benefits dilution geared towards getting people to pay higher fares.

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