Mask and or gel (in London/or where ever you are)

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 33 total)

  • BugAdvisor
    Participant

    I bet the man who invented hand sanitiser gel is rubbing his hands now!

    Sorry couldn’t resist that.

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    travelworld2
    Participant

    Martyn- I am in exactly that position now. I am just getting on with life as I haven’t been to a high risk area and don’t have a temperature, just a cold.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    Maaki
    Participant

    Just returned from the “dramatically affected” Düsseldorf…
    My Goodness, it drives me nuts to read so much nonsense, even in reliable papers (at least I thought that they are reliable …).

    In 2018/2019 alone more than 15.000 (!) people died in Germany of the “normal” flue virus. The vast majority of these people were either not vaccinated, got the wrong shot (because the right stuff was simply not avaibable) or were old and/or ill aynway.
    Nobody created such a hype as it is at present.

    I really askmyself, who does have any interest to create such a useles panic (or whom does it help).

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    canucklad
    Participant

    Having been out in the pouring rain, its freezing cold and after a meeting you had been waiting for your uber a little too long. The sniffles start within a few hours, sore throat, symptoms you just don’t want, but no temperature. You haven’t been anywhere at risk, but no longer seems to matter.

    Totally agree with that sentiment.
    Hate wearing a jacket even though I live on the same longitude as Moscow. Maybe its hardened me up. or playing Sport when I was younger in blizzard conditions every other week.
    Anyway, off to HK in a couple of weeks.

    Yes, i’ll source hand gel (60% + alcohol) before going
    No, I wont wear a mask, how am I expected to drink the alcohol

    have a great Corona free(except the Mexican type)weekend everybody

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    MarcusGB
    Participant

    I spent a normal workday at one the the Main London teaching Hospitals on Thursday.
    This regional Hospital, is one of the best we have in London, in terms of expertise, research and is one of the two London designated centres where those who need ITU support with the virus will be taking. As a Director, i was around most places and departments within the Hospital.

    I did not see ONE person all day, in any uniform, ina ANT rile,being that at all levels of Nursing from Staff Nurses to the Duty Hospital Senior Managers.
    No Dr’s nor any associated health occupation. Plenty of signs to use alco /hand gel, and most visitors and Professional staff were using these throughout this very large Hospital.something not evident at UK Airports, and all operating as in normal life.

    What we do know of the virus is it can be caught in close proximity, and contact or just being nearby can transmit the virus as it is airborne, eg when someone sneezes.
    Unless you wear a professional mask as worn in Theatre /Surgery, or for Barrier Nursing, There is NO EVIDENCE they make any difference.
    A medical grade mask used in Barrier Nursing, would also have a visor to protect the eyes nose, and ears where it can enter the body.
    It mostly enters the body through you touching your face nose mouth, after being in contact with it, which can be simply a door handle.
    It can live off the body for some hours, and is transmittable through what we touch and is airborne nearby. Remember this is a Virus, a clever one, of 2 types.
    The one type is more aggressive , and breaks through the immune system, causes inflammation of the Respiratory System, and especially for anyone with an underlying condition. who have a greater risk.

    It is a scientific fact, that a mask will NOT help you, as can easily get introduced through your nose, mouth eyes, ears.

    By all means carry hand gel, and use it on entering your workplace, and wash yr hands before. After taking Transport it would be sensible also.
    It is especially important to do this as you enter your home and keep it hygienic and not exposed. Some people are wearing disposable gloves when travelling on PT
    Check the NHS websites, WHO, and tens of countries around the World from the experts.
    Everyone has access to this information, so there is no excuse for behaving hysterically.

    I am sure there is much money buying these masks to be made, but they will Not prevent you getting the virus.
    You maybe well store up others and yr own bacteria, so causing quite the opposite, and they will can be effective only for some Minutes.
    These are The World Health Organisation and the UK’s expert scientists, epidemiologists, and Medics, and everyone has access to this, through the Dept of Health here.
    If you do choose to wear one, they offer no proven clinical protection for this fast, clever, new Virus, though to have transferred from a snake in the Wuhan Market where ut all began.

    Another fine example of bringing the human consuming of animals not meant or safe to do so, across into the food chain, and poor hygiene.

    We are very lucky having a co-ordinated National Health Service, as elsewhere such as The States, you will have to pay for tests and treatment yourself.

    The worst situation as travellers to be in now, would be to travel and place yourself in a poorly resourced non National co-ordinated country.
    The restrictions are getting more each day, and there are already Countries where people live, NOT being allowed back in, with many areas of The World being updated daily!.
    the travel industry is being hit hard, especially the Airports venues, Airlines ( and all the supply chains), hotels and flight bookings.

    Our lives will have to be restricted at some stage in the coming week, and is getting closed off for international travel.
    Everyday life will be different in the times ahead, and a vaccine would take 12-17 mon6ye,


    AircraftLover
    Participant

    You can find useful and clear information in this link

    https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51048366


    Johnnyg
    Participant

    My mother, bless her, usually goes to a dance on a Saturday evening. She has just told me she isn’t going tonight because she doesn’t want to catch the virus and shorten her life. she is 97,

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    Here in HK most people are wearing paper surgical masks. All day. Sometimes for several days. Unless they’re smoking, in which case they take it off for a while. Or if they’re eating, or drinking. But often do wear them while driving alone in their own cars. It is easy to poke fun and to point out the flaws in these approaches, especially as those paper masks are not guaranteed to filter out microbes as small as the coronavirus (although they may well catch some of them).

    Personally (with special reason as I am immunocompromised) when in close proximity to others I wear an N-99 mask, the best available (so far as I am aware) on the open market, and even that isn’t guaranteed to stop the virus, but I am determined to take all reasonable precautions to protect myself. For the same reasons, if I am going to touch a lot of surfaces touched by others (eg if I am shopping) I wear surgical gloves. I use hand sanitiser frequently. Others may think I am paranoid, but I don’t care.

    It is also worth remembering that a mask isn’t just to protect oneself, but also to protect others. If someone is going to sneeze in my face, I would prefer them to be wearing a mask, even if it doesn’t guarantee no infection! Certainly in HK it has become expected that other people wear masks, and I don’t think that’s a bad thing.

    At the end of the day we all need to be responsible adults and consider what is appropriate to protect us and others.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    cwoodward
    Participant

    In Hong Kong I carry masks but use them on rare occasions only to make others feel comfortable.
    I didn’t want to be intimidated into wearing a mask on the MTR on now rare journeys but am having some second thoughts after reading new evidences that indicates that this virus lives longer and travels further than was first thought.
    How true this ‘evidence’ is I am uncertain and am looking for some indication from the WTO or the like to confirm (or not) these reports.

    Using an effective sanitising gel that serves to protect both myself and others to some degree seems an easy and obvious step to take. Both this and masks are slowly becoming more available in Hong Kong although I read becoming increasing difficult to obtain in London.
    For our China factory workers we have just obtained 100,000 masks from India and have placed a further order.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    canucklad
    Participant

    So, I’ve managed to acquire hand gel from the manager of my local pub when she remembered I’m off to HK (at the moment-maybe HK will bar us) next week.
    I’m assuming she’s trying to ensure my wallet stays open on my return , and it isn’t confined to the house !!
    Keeping an eye out for a mask or 2 ,and smaller bottles of gel for the reasons that IanFromHKG mentioned but that’s not likely to happen .

    What has affected me, although not quite yet, is the ability to eat pasta or rice, wash my hands, clean my kitchen and wipe my arse !!
    Was in my local Asda last night, you’d think we were in the middle of the Cuban Missile Crisis !!

    It would appear that quite a few of my fellow citizens have totally flipped !!


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    The underlying reason for the run on, and shortage of, toilet tissue has finally been unearthed. Every time someone sneezes, another hundred people sh*t themselves!

    4 users thanked author for this post.

    TupeloKid
    Participant

    Here in HK most people are wearing paper surgical masks. All day. Sometimes for several days. Unless they’re smoking, in which case they take it off for a while. Or if they’re eating, or drinking. But often do wear them while driving alone in their own cars. It is easy to poke fun and to point out the flaws in these approaches, especially as those paper masks are not guaranteed to filter out microbes as small as the coronavirus (although they may well catch some of them).

    Personally (with special reason as I am immunocompromised) when in close proximity to others I wear an N-99 mask, the best available (so far as I am aware) on the open market, and even that isn’t guaranteed to stop the virus, but I am determined to take all reasonable precautions to protect myself. For the same reasons, if I am going to touch a lot of surfaces touched by others (eg if I am shopping) I wear surgical gloves. I use hand sanitiser frequently. Others may think I am paranoid, but I don’t care.

    It is also worth remembering that a mask isn’t just to protect oneself, but also to protect others. If someone is going to sneeze in my face, I would prefer them to be wearing a mask, even if it doesn’t guarantee no infection! Certainly in HK it has become expected that other people wear masks, and I don’t think that’s a bad thing.

    At the end of the day we all need to be responsible adults and consider what is appropriate to protect us and others.

    I have noticed that, since the infection numbers for their home countries have shot up, more foreigners in Hong Kong have started wearing masks.


    traveldoc1
    Participant

    The vast majority of masks are essentially paper and absolutely useless. In fact WORSE than useless as it gives people a false sense of security. I sit on the Skytrain in Bangkok watching around 50% of people with their masks – ill fitting, paper, they fiddle with the masks as they are uncomfortable, touch their masks then they play with their mobile phones. Give me a break! The same people would not use a motorcycle helmet where road accidents kill FAR more people. And Thailand is the second worst country in the world for road fatalities. Everyone – PLEASE get a sense of proportion.


    cwoodward
    Participant

    Probably Hong Kong has now become a safer place to be than UK/Europe.
    A number of pupils from our youngest boys school were sent to UK and Europe by parents.
    At least 3 of them have returned from the UK to HK in the past few days.
    My own boy has been in Canada for the past month and will stay a while longer until we are sure the improved situation in HK is ongoing.

    Huge quantities of toilet tissue at sale prices now at our local supermarkets and 7-Eleven stores.
    Clearly the shortage has been wiped out!

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    Tinp0tTaipan
    Participant

    True. What makes me chuckle in Hong Kong is people wearing masks in the street, where they’re not really close to anyone for any length of time, then going to a cafe, bar or restaurant and taking the mask off. Or when they pull it down to smoke, or talk on the phone.
    The mask-wearing culture in HK is out of hand. It is reasonable to wear a mask if you have a cold but there’s no point in wearing one to protect yourself, not least because they lose effectiveness so quickly. Also, I have seen medical professionals argue that wearing a mask makes you touch your face more often and I can believe this, they are an annoyance.
    There is zero point to wearing one on the MTR. Better to keep your hands in your pockets and don’t touch anything.
    There’s all sorts of tales about people trying to steam clean paper masks and re-using them for days on end, thus increasing the risk of disease (not necessarily COVID-19).
    What is working in HK is people taking advice on hand-washing, working from home and the border closure.

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