LHR T5 Aspire Lounge

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This topic contains 19 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  K1ngston 20 Oct 2017
at 08:40
.

Viewing 5 posts - 16 through 20 (of 20 total)

  • Tom Otley
    Keymaster

    As an update, when we got to the lounge, it was full, but you could put your name on a waiting list. We did so and were told it would be about 20 minutes, but in fact it was closer to five minutes.

    I went upstairs and guested one guest into the BA lounge.
    My wife used her Priority Pass Card and paid for our other child to enter the lounge where they spent about 90 minutes.

    Her review:

    “It’s long and narrow and feels like a corridor.
    The staff were very friendly.
    The first thing they tell you is “The toilets are outside.”
    There’s a long bank of workstations and further along comfortable seating with sofas and low tables.
    There are showers, but no toilets. Asking for trouble, I think.
    The food was very disappointing. A few lacklustre salads and cheese and crackers.
    The bar seemed busy, and the barman said to someone “Is this your first drink?” when he was asking for fizz, so I thought perhaps you only got one free Prosecco.”


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    lesmclaren I have been non domicile in the UK for 13 years always moving around and it suited me to keep all my credit cards and financial matters in the UK… Since I now have my own business and have lived in Singapore for more than 3 years I moved all my finances as it is expedient to do so (except for Amex Platinum)

    Non-resident, maybe, but very improbable that you are non-domiciled!


    crookieLondon
    Participant

    I don’t really understand why people pay lots of money for the Priority Pass card when I get mine free with my Natwest Black Bank account.


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    I don’t really understand why people pay lots of money for the Priority Pass card when I get mine free with my Natwest Black Bank account.

    Some people don’t have access to premium bank accounts or credit cards. Take my older daughter as an example – she is a university student in the UK, but regularly flies flies back to Hong Kong. Since she flies indirect, in economy, PP has been a great option for her.

    There are many frequent travellers flying economy who aren’t necessarily that well off (so privilege banking isn’t a realistic or sensible option) and for whom FF status is unachievable for a whole host of reasons.

    Remember also that in some markets (eg the US and Australia), FF status alone doesn’t give lounge access on domestic flights.

    Perhaps if you thought about other people who are not in the same position that you are, you could come up with more examples.


    K1ngston
    Participant

    +1 Ian

Viewing 5 posts - 16 through 20 (of 20 total)
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