LHR T3 security worst we have ever seen

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This topic contains 25 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  BrotherJim 22 Jul 2019
at 10:01
.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)

  • Usapes2
    Participant

    Flying from ORD to LIS transferring at LHR T3.

    Security agents were extremely rude to everyone in line.

    They laughed at one big heavy guy who couldn’t reach down to pick up his bag, idiots. After 8 hr overnight flight with sleep, I would see how you would move.

    They screamed at foreigners who didn’t speak English. As for us, they throw away prescribed medication, refused to call the manager, refused to provide their names nor badge number. Only once we started to call for help and making a scene, the manager showed up, he was nice and polite.

    We didn’t get the meds back cuz the guy already tossed them away.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    BrotherJim
    Participant

    Flying from ORD to LIS transferring at LHR T3.

    Security agents were extremely rude to everyone in line.

    They laughed at one big heavy guy who couldn’t reach down to pick up his bag, idiots. After 8 hr overnight flight with sleep, I would see how you would move.

    They screamed at foreigners who didn’t speak English. As for us, they throw away prescribed medication, refused to call the manager, refused to provide their names nor badge number. Only once we started to call for help and making a scene, the manager showed up, he was nice and polite.

    We didn’t get the meds back cuz the guy already tossed them away.

    Assume the medications were liquids?


    openfly
    Participant

    Totally agree….rude, aggressive operators every time in T3.


    Keith
    Participant

    I occasionally have to transfer T5 to T3. MAN MIAMI snd it’s usually a horrid experience Priority lane longer than others. Snotty staff bellowing at you. Manager may hsve been polite but actually the blame lies always with management and this needs senior management to change culture

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    RonaldoJ21
    Participant

    It is the worst terminal in the world for security. Very slow with very rude staff


    Gold-2K
    Participant

    How can it be so different between terminals? T5 is generally good but my experience at T5 has been exactly as per the posts above.


    MarcusGB
    Participant

    This does not surprise me at LHR, the attitudes are atrocious.
    It applies in All Terminals, and the people they employ.
    The word “Professional” should not be used, as they are not Professionals, nor meet the legal definitions of such.

    Regarding medications, if they remove your medications, then call the Police.
    You should always carry documentation wherever you travel, such as copy of the Prescription, a simple DR’s letter (I am registered with them and they prescribe medications..) for importing and exporting personal medications.
    They may be for symptomatic relief (eg painfillers, antacids), but it may well also be for essential use such a common heart or seizure medications.
    This could place someone’s personal health and safety at risk, let alone life, at risk.

    These security employees, have NO LEGAL right to remove such medications.
    This would be regarded and treated as theft, and they could well be restricted substances under law.
    They are YOUR property, you own them having paid for them
    They also cannot be put into ordinary rubbish bags, so Breaches of Health Safety, and provisions of Medications Regulations.

    Simply call the Police and have this matter dealt with, and the Terminal Manager can be called also by The Police.
    If they ever are found to do this take a photograph of them, and call The Police at the airport.
    You can also go to an information desk and ask the Terminal Manager be called.
    This is a disciplinary matter also.

    May i also advise, depending on the country of travel, IF you need you can get replacement medications from the Clinics of emergency / Consult rooms within a major airport, or a pharmacy advisor.
    In Amsterdam the First Aid office, can supply essential medications at cost, but you will need some documentations, and see a Registered Nurse or Dr.
    In The Far East eg Thailand, you can talk to the Pharmacist at the store in the terminal who can dispense medications, no prescriptions are required, or advise on alternatives.
    if you feel more secure and safe by doing this and have none with you, it is worth it.

    Many people take medications when flying these days.
    Within Europe this should not be a problem, but outside and even “In Transit” through some countries, it IS a Legal requirement to carry the correct documentation.
    In the UAE, there are over 300 medications (bought over the counter in the UK), that it is unlawful to possess, let alone transport.
    We have seen various cases with Analgesics, people being held , Prison terms.

    I would advise Everyone to carry some documentations with them, transport these in the prescribed boxes, a basic non specific Dr’s letter, and ALWAYS declare if there is a question about medications specifically on a Customs or entry form…
    (Eg entering Australia this is required).
    It is very valued when you are honest and open, and declare these, often they will not want to see them. In Australia they will thank you for being honest, and it will go on yr travel history of declaring and only benefit you.
    If you go through and do not declare them, you are committing an offence.

    Please remember, you are importing or exporting a drug that maybe only prescribed or restricted, or not carried in the countries you travel through. It is that law, not that of the UK that counts.
    As a Director of Nursing, i would state this as standard advice for any international travels, keep it with your insurances, and travel paperworks.
    If you then forget your medications, you also have proof of need and prescription in the UK, and could replace them easily wherever you are.
    but you have the fundamental right, as your purchased property for travel, notto have them removed.

    I hope this is useful, and sorry you had to go through this!

    7 users thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    The above is very sound advice, and thank you, however you say :

    If they ever are found to do this take a photograph of them,

    whilst there are no laws in the UK against taking photographs in airports generally, despite what some people may say, you are not allowed to take photographs in security, customs, and immigration areas. I suspect that trying to take a photo would inflame the situation, however it would ensure that the police are called and that may not be a bad thing.

    This was explained to me very clearly by Police at BRS a couple of years ago when a very unpleasant and officious woman at the Moneygram exchange bureau told me I couldn’t take photos of their appalling exchange rates because I was ‘breaking the law’. I asked her to call the police, she didn’t, but I found a couple of policemen and had a very pleasant chat to them.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    CathayLoyalist2
    Participant

    At the risk of asking a question that might have been addressed earlier , can anyone specifically advise what exactly are our rights/protections and legal redress against an agrressive search bordering on a potential sexual assault? Are their redlines security people cannot cross?


    MarkCymru
    Participant

    You’re allowed to take as much prescription medicine as you need, even if it’s liquid, from a UK airport. In theory, you should have a copy of the prescription but it’s fairly easy for a conscientious security official to tell if it’s legitimate or not. Heathrow, though, doesn’t have many conscientious security staff (unlike, for example, Bristol or Gatwick). https://www.gov.uk/hand-luggage-restrictions/essential-medicines-and-medical-equipment


    BrotherJim
    Participant

    Re liquid medicines and security as per the link in your post carrying a prescription is not just an in theory thing it is a requirement if you expect to get it through without a fight.

    And the poster above re carrying prescription medicine into Australia, it doesn’t actually HAVE to be declared. What does have to be declared are medicines (including prescription) that can be subject to misuse and traditional medicines. Though all prescription medicines you should carry a prescription for and the original packaging.

    The ABF (new name for immigration and customs) has a webpage which explaind what medicines are subject to abuse. Mostly narcotic based pain killers etc.

    That said like anything to do with entry to Australia if in doubt declare it.


    MarcusGB
    Participant

    With all due respect, that is not correct.
    Every medication has side effects, and every medication can be abused. Prescriptions really just mean pharmacy dispensed and Nurse or Dr issued.
    Paracetamol and Ibuprofen can be abused, often used for suicide attempts, and i have seen, fatal outcomes.

    I lived, and travel into Australia more than a few times a year, for over 20 yrs.
    Personally – Not declaring 6 Ibuprofen tablets, i went through x-ray and was pulled up, with a junior staff member shouting out “he’s got undeclared tablets in his bag”!
    The Senior Customs officer came over, and happily i showed and had an open discussion with her.
    She said “we are just very hot on this issue, and you must declare them, whatever you have.
    We have to ensure it is in a small personal use quantity, and if restricted or not”

    I do carry some with me especially for long haul flights, which maybe restricted, to sleep, relax, for headaches etc.
    I Always declare and go through red channel.
    On doing so, i do not even have x ray or secondary searches, straight out, after a face to face assessment handing over the card. They see clearly if you are honest, nervous or wish to screen you further.

    Australian customs on the landing card, states the following:

    “Are you bringing into Australia
    1. Goods that may be prohibited, or subject to restrictions, such as medicines, steroids, illegal proniography, firearms, Weapons or Illicit drugs?”

    This means ANY medications, over The Counter or prescribed (Huge variations country to country if permitted or not). Herbal / traditional need further screening by a specialised officer, and have to perhaps be stated as food, seeds organic which may also be restricted.

    So into Australia, or Any country that states “medicines”, do not assume what you have bought and carried, is permitted to transit or import into another country.
    You must declare them, and it can be a criminal offence not to do so. Severe penalties in Sharia Law countries, means imprisonment.


    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    I lived, and travel into Australia more than a few times a year, for over 20 yrs.
    Personally – Not declaring 6 Ibuprofen tablets, i went through x-ray and was pulled up, with a junior staff member shouting out “he’s got undeclared tablets in his bag”!

    @MarcusGB

    If Australia can pull you up for carrying Ibuprofen, (and yes I travel with 200mg pills as standard), I am beginning to wonder whether it now makes common sense to go through the red channel / declare, every time. I am not a walking pharmacy, but ibuprofen and a ‘Vick’ style nasal spray are standard travel provision for me.

    Are there any countries where you can get arrested for simply declaring (red channel) medicines which turn out to be illegal in that country.

    Also, what happens to medicines in checked bags in transit.. can you get into trouble if the bag is in transit???


    GivingupBA
    Participant

    ….i went through x-ray and was pulled up, with a junior staff member shouting out “he’s got undeclared tablets in his bag”! The Senior Customs officer came over….

    That happened to me entering Australia at Brisbane airport a few years ago. A guy chucked my wheelie bag into an x-ray machine, then put it through again, then (with a grim face) called the senior guy over. They confronted me with serious looks and showed me the x-ray image, pointed at what looked like a packet of pills, and said “What’s that, morphine? — or what is it?” I was flustered and said “It’s not morphine or any other drugs I don’t have any drugs”. They emptied my bag out and found…. a packet of peanuts from the plane. They laughed and waved me through…


    BrotherJim
    Participant

    With all due respect, that is not correct.

    Every medication has side effects, and every medication can be abused. Prescriptions really just mean pharmacy dispensed and Nurse or Dr issued.

    Paracetamol and Ibuprofen can be abused, often used for suicide attempts, and i have seen, fatal outcomes.

    I lived, and travel into Australia more than a few times a year, for over 20 yrs.

    Personally – Not declaring 6 Ibuprofen tablets, i went through x-ray and was pulled up, with a junior staff member shouting out “he’s got undeclared tablets in his bag”!

    The Senior Customs officer came over, and happily i showed and had an open discussion with her.

    She said “we are just very hot on this issue, and you must declare them, whatever you have.

    We have to ensure it is in a small personal use quantity, and if restricted or not”

    I do carry some with me especially for long haul flights, which maybe restricted, to sleep, relax, for headaches etc.

    I Always declare and go through red channel.

    On doing so, i do not even have x ray or secondary searches, straight out, after a face to face assessment handing over the card. They see clearly if you are honest, nervous or wish to screen you further.

    Australian customs on the landing card, states the following:

    “Are you bringing into Australia

    1. Goods that may be prohibited, or subject to restrictions, such as medicines, steroids, illegal proniography, firearms, Weapons or Illicit drugs?”

    This means ANY medications, over The Counter or prescribed (Huge variations country to country if permitted or not). Herbal / traditional need further screening by a specialised officer, and have to perhaps be stated as food, seeds organic which may also be restricted.

    So into Australia, or Any country that states “medicines”, do not assume what you have bought and carried, is permitted to transit or import into another country.

    You must declare them, and it can be a criminal offence not to do so. Severe penalties in Sharia Law countries, means imprisonment.

    With all due respect, that is not correct.

    I am Australian and travel overseas a good dozen times a year and have done so for about 20 years (except the 4 years I lived in London). I have prescription medicine and have never once declared them. I have on occasion after a bag scan been asked about medicines in my baggage, a quick look and all good. But never once been chastised for having not declared them.

    The key to this is the first line of the landing card which you quite kindly quoted.

    1. Goods that may be prohibited, or subject to restrictions

    Medicines are listed however as I mentioned ABF has a page where you can see what those restricted medicines are so no need to debate what kind of medicine can be abused or one can be come addicted to. ABF have taken the time to list the various classes that MUST be declared.

    And think about it for a moment I would say a good 90% of passengers would have some form of medicine on them.

    I will agree however there is an element of ambiguity around the wording on the card and indeed the ABF website. Which maybe gets back to the the basic rule with declaring in Australia is if in doubt declare.

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