Hotel ratings – do we need a sixth star?

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  LuganoPirate 12 Nov 2010
at 03:45
.

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  • Anonymous

    The forthcoming Wellesley hotel in Knightsbridge has announced its intention to become the first “six-star” hotel in London. What do you think about hotel ratings? Is there room for a sixth star, as recognition of the UK’s top hotels? Do you take any notice of star ratings? Do other countries have a better system than the UK?

    Here’s the news piece:

    http://www.businesstraveller.com/news/a-six-stara-hotel-to-open-in-knightsbridge

    And here’s our poll on the subject:

    http://www.businesstraveller.com/polls


    flyingbunny
    Participant

    No – a five star hotel offers quality services and staff and adding a star can’t make that better. Surely it is an excuse to charge more for room rates.
    Plus where does it stop? I am sure the seven star hotels in Dubai are excellent but are they any better than London’s five star hotels?
    I trust the UK system as it is and will be disappointed if it is changed.


    JWinter
    Participant

    Does a 6 star hotel make a five star hotel worse? Does it mean no one will stay in one star hotels?


    InterestedObserver
    Participant

    What’s a one star hotel?

    Do the ratings go that low?

    Wouldn’t it just be better to remain unrated?

    I always assumed it started at 3-star.


    NTarrant
    Participant

    Indeed there are one star hotels. Mostly seaside establishments in places such as Blackpool! Then of course you have “guest accomodation” it depends on what you want. I have a couple of staff who prefer to stay in B&B’s the only problem is that a number of these are not VAT registered and from a business point of view you will save 17.5% by them going in an Ibis or Premier Inn.

    I don’t think that another star is required. There are a number so called five star hotels but still don’t live up to the stars. Frankly the time has come to redo the star rating system.


    BABenji
    Participant

    Who is awarding the 6th and 7th star? What is the assessment criteria?

    The AA has already added an additional tier to the traditional ratings by awarding Red Stars in each catagory to recognise those hotels that stand out.

    6 and 7 star is just the brainchild of some horrible marketing person. A boast a few years ago, but it’s just boring now.


    flyingbunny
    Participant

    I’d like to know who is rating the hotel and if it means other hotels will want to be re-rated.

    I have found a seven AND A HALF star hotel…Which was due to be built five years ago in Iraq…

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2005/nov/10/iraq.iraq

    Half stars. Even more horrible marketing person.


    DisgustedofSwieqi
    Participant

    “What’s a one star hotel? “

    An Etap, for example.

    Not my prefered place, but I stay in one as it is 5 minutes walk from a client in the suburbs of Paris, with no alternative.

    Does exactly what it says on the tin and one should not confuse 1* with dirty or dangerous, it just has very few facilities!


    PilotAddict
    Participant

    Brilliant i am looking forward to hotels raising the bar. in a competitive market it will hopefully focus more on service standards than fancy fittings.

    If there are no one star hotels and three star was the start – then is a six star the new four star?


    Cedric_Statherby
    Participant

    Surely the point about stars is that it does not matter how many there are so much as who gives them. A self awarded rating is worth almost nothing, even if it is 6, 7 or 200 stars, yet everyone knows that 3 stars from Michelin – just three – is an accolade of the highest order.

    The other point is that everyone also knows what the Michelin stars mean, in other words what to expect. Of course this does not mean that everyone likes the food in a Michelin 3-star restaurant or appreciates it: to some people Michelin three-star may mean sublime food, exquisite service and a wonderful experience, but to others it means over-fussy attention to unnecessary complications and an eye-watering bill. The important point is that very few people will be hugely surprised by what they get in one.

    And this is the point. The stars are there to inform, to guide and to make sure you are not unpleasantly surprised. I know nothing about the Wellesley hotel or on what grounds it thinks it is worth 6 stars (or any other number), so its 6th star means nothing to me. Only when someone whose ranking system I know and trust rates it will I be able to assess what to expect were I to consider staying at it.


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    You’re right flying bunny, the 7* Dubai hotels are excellent, but they are not worthy of them. They are at best 5* and nothing else. They simply cannot beat the 5* elegance of the Plaza Athenee in Paris, or the Victoria Jungfrau in Interlaken etc.

    I also find the star ratings of the AA to be very dubious indeed! I can think of several hotels they have given top ratings to that simply do not meet even the standard of a good 4*.

    I have found without exception the Michelin guides to give a fair and honest assessment of hotels and restaurants, and when you visit one you know what to expect.

    As a rough guide a 5* should offer as a minimum:
    doorman / bellhops
    Concierge
    24 hour reception
    24 hour room service
    Evening turndown with all towels being changed and used soaps etc replaced
    All rooms furnished to a high standard

    Service should be impeccable with staff remembering you by name.
    Only then does a hotel begin to qualify.

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