Definition of Transit

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This topic contains 30 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  LondonCity 27 Dec 2012
at 17:49
.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 31 total)

  • Anonymous

    SimaHir
    Participant

    I was planning to be in BKK for 18 hours so booked a day return to Yangon, Myanmar. The Myanmar embassy website (UK) states when in transit a visa is obtainable upon arrival.

    Air Asia refused to let me board, saying that transit means going from A-B-C and not A-B-A and without a visa I could not travel.

    Does anyone know what the legal position is since Air Asia have refused to refund me hence I may now involve my credit card (legal team)?

    Thanks


    Binman62
    Participant

    Simon…I would have assumed that transit ment not leaving the airport and getting off one aircraft and either getting back on the same one or another. So Air Asia were probably correct.

    Transit of the UK is also allowed without a visa but one would not be allowed to land and visit London….unless one did not require a visa to begin with.

    I think the issue here is one of definition. Passengers look at transit as a stop where as the authorities see it as just that, a transit of the airport.

    A bit like direct flights and and non stop flights.


    ImissConcorde
    Participant

    On the journey A-B-C B is a connection point. Provided not leaving the transit area documents are not normally required. On the journey A-B-A B is the point of turnaround and the passenger would have to comply with government requirements to enter that country.


    SimaHir
    Participant

    If indeed transit requires one to remain air-side/in the airport, surely there would be no need for any visa at all, which begs the question, what is, therefore, a 24 hour transit visa?


    FormerlyDoS
    Participant

    Simon

    “Air Asia refused to let me board, saying that transit means going from A-B-C and not A-B-A and without a visa I could not travel.”

    This is also my understanding, sorry 🙁

    “If indeed transit requires one to remain air-side/in the airport, surely there would be no need for any visa at all”

    Non sequitur, some countries require a visa even for airside transit.

    Australia, for one

    http://www.immi.gov.au/visitors/transit/771/


    SimaHir
    Participant

    I rest my case!

    Thanks for being so prompt and informative.


    FormerlyDoS
    Participant

    Sorry it wasn’t better news.


    SimonS1
    Participant

    Yes my understanding is the same. A transit visa is provided where there is a long delay between your arrival and onward connecting flight.

    I wouldn’t class a day trip to somewhere (which is effectively what you were trying to do) as being in transit. In fact sometimes the airline can be fined in such circumstances which presumably is why you were denied boarding.


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    I’m afraid I also have to say Air Asia was correct in this case. Transit is usually arriving in B from and and continuing on the next available flight to C. What you were trying to do was make a day trip.

    Further, if people arriving in transit were allowed to leave the airport and visit without a visa, for nationals who normally need a visa, this would effectively amount to a back door into the country.

    Having said that, there are one or two countries that issue a day visa on the spot depending on nationality and providing certain conditions are fulfilled – though for the life of me I can’t recall who they are just now!


    navnov11
    Participant

    I think Singapore is one example where it allows Indian nationals a transit visa of upto 96 hours when they have an ongoing journey either to India or countries such as Australia, UK, US etc.


    AnthonyDunn
    Participant

    Surprisingly, bearing in mind just how much of a police state it is, you can get transit visas for up to 24 hours when passing through Beijing – and presumably other Chinese transit points such as Shanghai – assuming that you have the ticket for the onwards connection. I am not aware of any restrictions to this depending upon the passport held.


    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    Just thinking Anthony, perhaps because it’s such a police state, they’re not too worried about finding the person and then throwing them out!


    JordanD
    Participant

    Lugano – another one in Kenya, where Transit visas are available for a USD10 fee at the airport allowing up to 24hr access, on proof of an onward flight (only applicable for passport holders of certain nations).


    canucklad
    Participant

    Your mistake Simon, was to book a point to point flight .

    I’m sure Air Asia is legally obliged to ensure correct landing documentation at point of departure.

    Many years ago, on the way to OZ for my best friends wedding, a few of us flew EDI/AMS/DPS/SYD ( On a through ticket) which involved a 2 night stopover in Bali whilst transiting to SYD.

    My mate was refused boarding at AMS because his UK passport had less than 6 months before renewal, even though i final destination didn’t require the 6 month rule!

    I have transited through quite a few places and gone airside if timings allowed, i’ve got to say, never been brave enough to jump on another plane and fly to another country though!! Or try too 🙂

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