Covid-19 tests

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  • travelworld
    Participant

    A number of countries now require a negative Covid-19 test taken no more than 96 hours before departure as a precondition to enter. This may become increasingly common- if not standard practice. In the UK at least, free NHS tests are reserved for those with symptoms, in high risk groups or healthcare and other essential workers. If you aren’t in any of those groups is the only alternative a private test- if so, how widely are they available?

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    nevereconomy
    Participant

    From everything I have seen, a negative test result 24 or 48 hours before arrival in a country may mean very little.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    simeoncox
    Participant

    I am finding that I cannot board an aircraft without a negative swab within 72 hours prior to departure. While there are numerous private hospitals and clinics offering the service (BLR), the attendant price gouging is repulsive. These numerous healthcare centres also use the fixed number of gov’t laboratories for testing (they only take the swabs, not process them) so the 3-day window is not guaranteed.

    Availability is not the only factor to consider when arranging initial Covid-19 testing. If your are refused boarding, what options are there for accessing further accommodation; ticket refunds and credit shells; re-testing; local quarantine directives; etc.? These are considerations I must now negotiate before I arrive at an airport.

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    Stevescoots
    Participant

    I am looking into this as well. 4 weeks ago, there was a possibility I could get expert acceptance to get back into China but needed a test just for the application. I had an NHS one done next day by applying “with symptoms” “cough cough” of course it was negative.

    One problem however was that it was rejected by the Authorities local to my company because the NHS only send you an email and SMS with almost no details except DOB and name. its so poor that the only date on it is the email chain that I could just alter………However and no wonder, the authorities will only accept results from approved places, which you would think NHS would be. Of course, this is China so they do not actually tell you. Anyway, it was all a bit academic because they suspended the application when China started to get more cases.
    Fast forward 4 weeks and now I need to get one for my return to Vietnam that may..or may not happen in 10 days (that’s another story) Of course I have had my NHS freebie so will pay this time. At 125 quid min it seems a small price to pay to get me on the plane whether I agree with it or not. The biggest issue though is will it be recognised by the airline and the arrival authorities as none seem to have a format they need
    Then if my flight gets cancelled, I think I am up to 3 or 4 cancelations so far, I will have to pay again for another test.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    Gold-2K
    Participant

    I have just given up on any travel for the remainder of 2020. I was getting stressed about it but I have now decided to focus only on the things I can control. I am told I can get back to USA if I go to Dubai for 2 weeks and then fly direct to East Coast, but not going to do that! In the current climate something will change before I get to my destination. Getting an acceptable test is one of the biggest variables. So I am accepting my life of ‘Zoom Hell’ for the rest of 2020 and will hopefully pick up where we left off sometime in early 2021, ideally with a vaccine …… ho hum!

    The UK is not that bad a place to be stuck right now, providing I don’t accidentally find myself watching TV news with some lightweight UK Government Minister (or their boss) talking total nonsense!

    5 users thanked author for this post.

    FaroFlyer
    Participant

    Gold-2K wrote:

    “The UK is not that bad a place to be stuck right now, providing I don’t accidentally find myself watching TV news with some lightweight UK Government Minister (or their boss) talking total nonsense!”

    You may say that, but I couldn’t possibly comment.

    4 users thanked author for this post.

    JohnnyG
    Participant

    A number of countries now require a negative Covid-19 test taken no more than 96 hours before departure as a precondition to enter. This may become increasingly common- if not standard practice. In the UK at least, free NHS tests are reserved for those with symptoms, in high risk groups or healthcare and other essential workers. If you aren’t in any of those groups is the only alternative a private test- if so, how widely are they available?

    Not quite so, in the UK now anyone can apply for a test, I had the opportunity in the last few days to have a reserved appointment to see my mother who is in hospital 200 miles away. I went on the NHS website and booked a Covid test for the following lunchtime in the area where she lives. Straight forward application, no known symptoms, but I wanted piece of mind before I attended. Result , negative thank goodness. Still had to have a health check before admission to the ward.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    J_Pathmore
    Participant

    What is this about Heathrow planning tests on arrival + another test 8 days later before you dont have to quarantine? I might have this information wrong but anything less than a few hours of quarantine seems utterly useless for business and leisure travelers.


    simeoncox
    Participant

    A test for COVID-19 indicates the status of the tested only at the time of testing. If a passenger is negative prior to flying (from a mandatory pre-flight test) and contracts COVID-19 between the pre-flight test and the arrival test, then symptoms will not likely be felt for 3-7 days. The on-arrival test provides a point from which the 3-day infective period and viral shedding has been found to occur. Testing on arrival and at Day 7/8 captures the window wherein symptoms are known to exacerbate, and also a possible 72 hours for detecting the virus contracted in isolation.

    The entire testing regime (72 hours + flight time + 7/8 days) falls within the known time for developing symtoms, 14 days. This is why the quarantine period is two weeks.


    simeoncox
    Participant

    A test for COVID-19 indicates the status of the tested only at the time of testing. If a passenger is negative prior to flying (from a mandatory pre-flight test) and contracts COVID-19 between the pre-flight test and the arrival test, then symptoms will not likely be felt for 3-7 days. The on-arrival test provides a point from which the 3-day infective period and viral shedding has been found to occur. Testing on arrival and at Day 7/8 captures the window wherein symptoms are known to exacerbate, and also a possible 72 hours for detecting the virus contracted in isolation.

    The entire testing regime (72 hours + flight time + 7/8 days) falls within the known time for developing symptoms, 14 days. This is why the quarantine period is two weeks.

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    J_Pathmore
    Participant

    Understood. So based on this do you think transatlantic travel will only open when cases get very low? Or is a testing requirement day of travel/on arrival good enough to take a risk albeit not perfect.


    travelworld
    Participant

    I’m 57, male, asthmatic, slightly overweight and a former cancer patient (fortunately in remission for over five years). I’m not taking any risks and am staying firmly here in the UK….

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    SimonS1
    Participant

    Understood. So based on this do you think transatlantic travel will only open when cases get very low? Or is a testing requirement day of travel/on arrival good enough to take a risk albeit not perfect.

    Transatlantic travel has always been open and the airlines are still operating. Just that UK nationals are effectively blocked from entering US, and travellers from US need to quarantine for 2 weeks arriving here. With the high level of infections in USA it is hard to see UK Government requirements changing any time soon.

    Of course regardless of policies, at the end of the day only you can determine your level of risk tolerance for travel.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    simeoncox
    Participant

    “So based on this do you think transatlantic travel will only open when cases get very low? Or is a testing requirement day of travel/on arrival good enough to take a risk albeit not perfect.”

    I am not looking at Transatlantic routes, but the Asia/Gulf region, and numbers therein. A few airlines have been flying for a month or so; others are taking bookings again, but holding off flying until gov’ts open their borders; a few have tentatively eyed off August, but are holding off; some are judiciously setting dates for or September. In any case, a full-blown in-transit transmission event would cripple an airline, so they will almost all stick to the most conservative requirements to manage risk. So should we. I can’t afford littering South and Southeast Asia with unused and possibly unredeemable credit shells. I just don’t have that sort of leeway.

    I will be booking a medium-haul flight in Asia for early September, and arranging a swab for under 72 hours prior to departure. It will be a night flight, business class, and a window seat, rear of the cabin; I will have three N95 masks for the 6-7 hour flight. I will have established whether accommodation at the destination is in quarantine nominated by the local gov’t or in isolation arranged by me. I will bunker down for 14 days, no matter which: I can monitor my own health. I will sit it out in whichever that country proves to be, until such time as my goal destination opens its international borders. This may be some time.

    I recognise that at any stage or at any time, it all might turn to poo. But I’m up to my armpits in it anyway, with the infection numbers rising around me, so I’m going to risk it.


    TerryMcManus24
    Participant

    Although stranded here …no complaints safest Country in the World…some Latest info regarding Thailand What do you have to prepare prior to traveling to Thailand?…fio.
    The foreigner or non-Thai nationals Must carry the necessary documents as follows:

    Certificate of Entry(COE)issued by the Thai Embassy or consulate in your Current Location.(UK)
    Fit to Fly Certificate issued by relevant authority and the COVID-19 Medical Test result. This must be issued No longer than 72 Hours before the date of travel.This certificate is also Necessary at the airline’s check-in counter for a boarding pass to be issued.(otherwise will be refused)
    Health Insurance Policy covering Treatment and Medical expenses related to COVID-19 with a minimum coverage of 100,000 USD.
    How to Obtain a Certificate of Entry?
    The foreigner must apply for the certificate of entry from the local Thai Embassy or Consulate at least 10 working days Prior to the intended date of travel and must submit the following documents to the consular section of the Thai embassy or consulate:

    Passport..
    Original or copy of the valid work permit or Letter issued by the relevant authorities of Thailand indicating permission for entry into Thailand for work purposes (if applicable).
    Copy of the valid Non-immigrant visa or extension of stay based on the Non-immigrant visa.
    Copy of the Health Insurance Policy covering treatment and medical expenses related to COVID-19 a minimum coverage of 100,000 USD.
    Copy of flight details of the intended Date of travel. ….and this is just for starters ouch….so Info on C19 tests and certification providers in London would be most welcome…

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