Business Class Delays/Transfer to Different Airline

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  SimonS1 16 Aug 2019
at 14:58
.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

  • SukhDhillon
    Participant

    During mine and my wife’s recent travel in business class, ourr original flight from BHX-FRA was delayed and therefore we would have missed our connecting flight FRA-HKG. We were then transferred to Emirates EK038 BHX-DXB and then further EK380 DXB-HKG.

    Our original ETA in HKG with the Lufthansa itinerary was 15:45 on Thursday, however with the later departure time from BHX and further delays in DXB (we were sat on the runway for approx 3hours), we arrived in HKG at 00:20 on Friday, 8hrs 35mins after our scheduled arrival time.

    We were wondering where we stood in terms of any compensation.

    Thanks very much


    capetonianm
    Participant

    If you were on a through ticket BHX-HKG, and unless the airline can claim circumstances beyond their control (e.g weather, ATC restrictions, strikes of third parties) you should be entitled to €600 each.

    Your first attempt to claim this might be brushed off with ‘it wasn’t our fault’, even if it was. You may need to be persistent if you wish to claim.

    Good luck.


    SukhDhillon
    Participant

    Thanks a lot, I have sent Lufthansa an email, it’s been over 24hrs and I haven’t received any correspondence.

    On the phone, they say they will only respond to emails not to requests over the phone. Let’s see what happens.

    Thanks for your response.


    anyonebutba
    Participant

    Unfortunately you accepted the new itinerary, so LH has no obligation to pay compensation,if you had requested from the ticket desk at the time of changing your tickets they may well have advised the reason for the initial delay, and if it was within they’re control then you could have claimed there and then,furthermore if the flight to HKG was delayed from Dubai then LH are not responsible for that it would be EK as they are the operating carrier. FYI you sent a mail 24 hours ago, average processing time is between 6-12 weeks so no you would not have had a response just yet 🙂 good luck but I sense from my experience (in aviation, not as a traveller) you will get zero compensation.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Unfortunately you accepted the new itinerary, so LH has no obligation to pay compensation

    I am not sure this is correct.

    average processing time is between 6-12 weeks……… good luck but I sense from my experience (in aviation, not as a traveller) you will get zero compensation.

    Sadly this is probably true. They are appalling at dealing with correspondence and if you ‘phone them they just repeat robotic responses : “It is being dealt with and I can’t do anything or discuss it further.”


    SimonS1
    Participant

    Unfortunately you accepted the new itinerary, so LH has no obligation to pay compensation,if you had requested from the ticket desk at the time of changing your tickets they may well have advised the reason for the initial delay, and if it was within they’re control then you could have claimed there and then,furthermore if the flight to HKG was delayed from Dubai then LH are not responsible for that it would be EK as they are the operating carrier. FYI you sent a mail 24 hours ago, average processing time is between 6-12 weeks so no you would not have had a response just yet 🙂 good luck but I sense from my experience (in aviation, not as a traveller) you will get zero compensation.

    This is complete nonsense.

    Point 2 of EC261 Article 7 makes clear that compensation is still payable even when the passenger is re-routed. In this context (and in precedent) the operating air carrier causing the delay is LH which is responsible for compensation.

    The point about the flight from Dubai to HK is also nonsense, the ECJ in Air France v Folkerts made clear it is only arrival at final ticketed destination that counts. This was reinforced by the CAA, Emirates then appealed this up to the Supreme Court and lost at every stage.

    Finally the ‘average processing time’ is of no relevance. Both the CAA and the arbitration schemes consider 8 weeks to be an acceptable period, if the airline cannot organise itself then that is the point at which the traveller may submit a claim to the arbitration scheme (SOP) or alternatively to the courts (MCOL).

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