Busiest passenger routes by number of flights

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  • canucklad
    Participant

    Eurotunnel opened before the 777 came into service. But BA used to roster TriStars on the CDG route and AF had A300s.

    Thanks

    I recall flying a KLM DC10 from LHR-AMS heading back home. What was memorable about it, was the DC10 was grounded at the time in the Us, but not KLM’s variant

    And talking about busy long haul routes , I was rather surprised at how many flights ply the LHR-HKG route.
    Especially back in the day when you added Qantas and Air NZ into the mix.


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    Eurotunnel opened before the 777 came into service. But BA used to roster TriStars on the CDG route and AF had A300s.

    Thanks

    I recall flying a KLM DC10 from LHR-AMS heading back home. What was memorable about it, was the DC10 was grounded at the time in the Us, but not KLM’s variant

    And talking about busy long haul routes , I was rather surprised at how many flights ply the LHR-HKG route.
    Especially back in the day when you added Qantas and Air NZ into the mix.

    There was a mid-morning LHR-AMS flight when KL would schedule a wide body aircraft. It was to provide extra capacity for both passengers (many of whom were transferring to long-haul departures) but also cargo.

    In the past LH used to operate A300s on the FRA-LHR route (at selected times) for extra capacity. There would be three flights daily at key times for connecting traffic via Frankfurt.

    To ensure good timekeeping that A300 remained on the ground at LHR for two hours.


    TominScotland
    Participant

    These list only has domestic flights on.
    What about LHR/JFK, LHR/CDG?

    I believe the former is the world’s most profitable route, it would be surprising if it didn’t top Hanoi to SGN

    Seat 62K, this list is purely to do with the number of flights, not profitability or, indeed, number of pax. I think, in many cases, these routes are low-yield and highly competitive with new LCC entrants. Many of the routes (MEL-SYD, LAX – SFO and the Japanese routes from Haneda being exceptions) are relatively unrestricted in terms of slot availability and take-off/ landing times. They also lack alternative, high-speed land alternatives. Before the advent of high speed rail, you would have expected Beijing – Shanghai to be on the list.


    GeorgeJ
    Participant

    The most interesting one on the list is Belize city to San Pedro in the Cays, albeit the largest plane on the route is 12 passengers (smallest @ 3). However you need to get to Belize City in the first place which isnt so easy, only a few direct routes inbound and all from the US or Canada and nothing from the neighbours, even the Maya air route from Cancun seems to have been dropped. A classic case of feast and famine


    traveldoc1
    Participant

    I still look forward each month to the arrival of my OAG timetable. Also here in Thailand I get a monthly local timetable. Am I a geek??? Very much, according to my wife – who nevertheless is happy to consult me on travel plans AND recommend me to friends and family!!

Viewing 5 posts - 16 through 20 (of 20 total)
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