'Boeing's Killer Planes' on BBC One

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This topic contains 26 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  cwoodward 8 Aug 2019
at 05:35
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Viewing 12 posts - 16 through 27 (of 27 total)

  • Chris in Makati
    Participant

    As others have said, the program needed more time in order to go into the issue in more depth.

    Although I have every sympathy for the families of those killed. I thought all the interviews with tearful relatives didn’t contribute anything to the investigation and just took up time that could have been better used.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    I thought precisely the same, it was inappropriate, poor taste, and unhelpful to show those parts.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    maxgeorge
    Participant

    Wall Street Journal, August 1, P 1:

    An FAA internal risk analysis following the Lion Air crash showed the “likelihood was high” of a similar cockpit emergency within months.

    FAA action? Suggested a warning to pilots to make them aware of the problem would be enough to provide Boeing 10 months to redesign and implement changes to MCAS.

    Boeing action? Suggested the Lion Air pilots were to blame and assure all that the MCAS was safe.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    canucklad
    Participant

    “likelihood was high”

    The continual bleed of negative information around Boeings handling of this known issue is probably now more damaging long term than if Boeing and more importantly its highly paid executives did the right thing and simply admit responsibility, resign and allow a new regime to begin again .

    IMO, their continued presence at Boeing is actually risking the existence of the company as we know it today

    The FAA is probably now realizing the gravity of their own part in this tragedy , and are understandably but cowardly distancing themselves from Boeings “alleged” criminal negligence .


    maxgeorge
    Participant

    Current US Secretary of Transportation, and therefore ultimate boss of the FAA?

    Elaine Chow.

    Married to ‘Moscow Mitch’ McConnel, Republican Senate Majority leader.

    No blame there, then, for any lack of oversight of Boeing.

    Just the media making a fuss over a few dead bodies.

    Move along, please.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Boeing ‘fundamentally’ redesigning 737 MAX flight control software
    The Seattle Times broke the news yesterday that Boeing’s update to the 737 MAX will ‘fundamentally redesign’ the flight control software to take input data from both flight control computers during a flight, rather than just one.

    Reporting earlier this week by the New York Times and Wall Street Journal focused on the relationship between Boeing and the FAA during MAX certification and what the FAA learned about MCAS after the first crash, respectively. All three pieces are worth reading in full.

    https://www.seattletimes.com/business/boeing-aerospace/newly-stringent-faa-tests-spur-a-fundamental-software-redesign-of-737-max-flight-controls/?utm_campaign=website&utm_source=sendgrid.com&utm_medium=email

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/regulators-found-high-risk-of-emergency-after-first-boeing-max-crash-11564565521?utm_campaign=website&utm_source=sendgrid.com&utm_medium=email

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    LetsFlyNow
    Participant

    @MartynSinclar

    About 2wks ago, it was reported that Boeing is setting aside $5billion for compensation (to airlines) in their financial report. It’s also possible that production on the 737Max will be stopped altogether if the plane is not yet certified in 2020 (which is probably going to be the case). In that case expect job losses. Ofcourse airlines will get their deposit back as Boeing didn’t fulfil their end of the contract. For now, production is still continuing though at a much slower rate.

    Airbus hasn’t gained much in orders as its production/delivery slots are sold out/booked for many years to come. Airbus is looking for ways to increase production on the high-in-demand A321Neo as the manufacturer is behind schedule so any airine ordering new A320/321neos has many many years to wait. As such many airlines hope the issue with the Max will be solved sooner than later.

    Also don’t forget that Boeing hurriedly came up with the 737Max and rushed it into production after Airbus announced the Neo and American Airlines made a big order.
    Will Boeing resume production on the 737NG to keep some airlines happy for the time being? It’s a possibility.


    transtraxman
    Participant

    “The Boeing 737 MAX Might Need 2 Computers To Iron Out Flaws” (Simple Flying 5-8-19)

    https://simpleflying.com/category/trip-reports/


    cwoodward
    Participant

    What the Boeing B737 Max needs is a radical structural redesign as currently it has the flying ability of a brick and in my opinion (and many others) no amount of fight computers can make this over stretched contraption fly safely.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    Chris in Makati
    Participant

    What the Boeing B737 Max needs is a radical structural redesign as currently it has the flying ability of a brick and in my opinion (and many others) no amount of fight computers can make this over stretched contraption fly safely.

    That’s my thoughts too. It just seems to be basically aerodynamically unstable.


    K1ngston
    Participant

    What the Boeing B737 Max needs is a radical structural redesign as currently it has the flying ability of a brick and in my opinion (and many others) no amount of fight computers can make this over stretched contraption fly safely.

    That’s my thoughts too. It just seems to be basically aerodynamically unstable.

    So here’s my question and genuinely do not know the answer here? What is fundamentally different about the Max? Is it just the engines or deeper than that? if it is deeper than that is the 737 as a whole flawed? I am assuming not as its been the most successful plane, so would putting back smaller engines help? My guess the brand has been damaged fatally and can’t recover!


    cwoodward
    Participant

    Deeper than that K1ngston

    The fuselage has been lengthened.
    The engines are located much further forward on the fuselage.
    The engine are larger, heavier and more powerful.

    The result is that at the moment it basically won’t fly safely or reliably and in my view never will.
    I hope that I am wrong as if not I suspect that the huge error of judgement and greed by the Boeing board will destroy the Boeing company in its present form.

    The B737 was a good safe aircraft back in the 1960’s when it was designed.
    For many years a great and reliable workhorse.
    Since then it has been pushed and pulled many times to make it fly further, use less fuel and carry more passengers.

    The B737 is now a very old and outdated structural design and the Max is just one step too far………the old girl is simply passed her ‘use by’ date.

    6 users thanked author for this post.
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