Boeing -more disturbing reading

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This topic contains 35 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by  Ahmad 2 Oct 2019
at 19:06
.

Viewing 6 posts - 31 through 36 (of 36 total)

  • cwoodward
    Participant

    Not exactly.

    Only 386 DC10 passenger aircraft were built. Of these 32 crashed and were written off

    The number of 707 passenger aircraft built was 865
    Between 1959 and 1997 -almost 30 years (the last passenger 707s were built in 1985-6) there were 34* hull losses due to air accidents. * this may not be absolutely accurate but it is close.
    There have been a number of crashes of the over 50 year old aircraft operated by 3rd 4th 5th level operators since 1995 but is reasonable I believe to suggest that this is more the fault of the operator than the very old often poorly maintained aircraft.

    Thus my view remains that the B707 over a normal passenger service life was the safer aircraft.


    canucklad
    Participant

    The were in fact 11 versions of the DC10 which started life as a short-mid haul domestic aircraft.
    It was extensively pushed and pulled into what finally became large long haul aircraft.

    And as it mutated into the longer stretched MD11 did it not become a more difficult aircraft to manage when landing.
    In fact, certified DC10 pilots migrating onto the MD11 were more susceptible to making mistakes purely because of the feeling of familiarity with an aircraft that fundamentally looked the same but due to the extended length had a very different flying dynamic.

    And I agree, the DC10 was a very fine aircraft, arguably the most comfortable I’ve flown on .

    The 707 on the other didn’t change at all , as far as I recall ? unless you consider the 720


    capetonianm
    Participant

    There is a precedent to the grounding of the 737 MAX.

    After the 1989 Kegworth crash (British Midland) all 99 remaining 737-400s were grounded. There had been a problem with the vibration indicators and no flight tests or training had been carried out, neither being mandatory in those times, as it is now. Of course this was just one of the factors contributing to the crash.

    An example of how in theory after any accident, flying becomes safer. In theory!


    cwoodward
    Participant

    Airlines and leesors may be starting to file lawsuits against Boeing.
    Given the protracted delays and the huge losses that airlines are experiencing probably it was just a matter of time before the floodgates started to open.

    https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/rostec-unit-sues-boeing-alleging-737-max-fraud-460532/

    I read the other day the the US Federal Government has $67 billion of loan guarantees in place to Boeing…..they may need it!

    It would seem that there is little chance of them going broke though.


    tomwjsimpson
    Participant

    737NG Checks

    Not such good news for Boeing, almost all 737NG’s to be checked within a week or 1000 flight hours


    Ahmad
    Participant

    And now this👇

    https://www.seattletimes.com/business/boeing-aerospace/boeing-whistleblowers-complaint-says-737-max-safety-upgrades-were-rejected-over-cost/?amp=1&__twitter_impression=true

    I wonder how long it will take for Boeing to instil confidence again

    1 user thanked author for this post.
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