BA has a new U.K. TV advert.

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  capetonianm 19 Nov 2018
at 11:27
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  • openfly
    Participant

    Over the last few nights I have seen a new tv advert in which BA is telling the world that it has collected £20m since it linked with Comic Relief. Not the best of adverts and I can only imagine that Comic Relief are paying for it. (Maybe The Alan Sugar Apprentices produced it!!)
    The thing that I find annoying is that, under the auspices of helping the poor children of the world, the Relief company needs £18m per year , according to the Daily Telegraph, to pay its expensive ceo, board and 288 staff. So does any part of the £20m passenger donations, over the years, actually get to the poverty stricken kids?


    SimonS1
    Participant

    Well Comic Relief accounts are published if you are concerned. I believe between 85% and 90% of money raised is donated to projects and good causes.

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    Well Comic Relief accounts are published if you are concerned. I believe between 85% and 90% of money raised is donated to projects and good causes.

    According to the video (5 mins 20 seconds), ‘every penny of which will help children all over the world……’.

    85-90% is not every penny, at least where I come from.

    Here’s the proof

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    Andrew
    Participant

    Yes the full donation does go to the charitable causes , as comic relief operates the principle that all donated money goes to charity the expenses such as salaries is covered by sponsorship and interest accumulated on deposits.
    It’s main supporters are BBC , BT ( I assume British Telecom not Business Traveller ! ) BA and Sainsbury’s
    It has raised over £1bn in its 30 year history

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    LuganoPirate
    Participant

    The thing that I find annoying is that, under the auspices of helping the poor children of the world, the Relief company needs £18m per year , according to the Daily Telegraph, to pay its expensive ceo, board and 288 staff.

    This is precisely why I don’t donate to any of these large charities preferring to support small local charities where the directors are on no or very reasonable salaries.

    Also suggest reading “Dead Aid” by Dambisa Moyo who really lifts the lid on these large charities and how they and NGO’s actually contribute to slowing the development of underdeveloped countries. These charities have a real interest in keeping poverty and other causes going. Imagine Poverty was eradicated, which is their aim, they would all be out of work as the charity would no longer be needed. Dambisa explains this much better than I can

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    There are just two charities I regularly support – The Royal British Legion, and the RNLI. The former because having lost both my grandfathers in WWII, and my father having been seriously injured in the Dunkirk landings (he made an almost full recovery, but spent 1½ years in hospital) their good works seem more personal to me. The latter because I am a keen boater and it is the only charity I am aware of where local people regularly volunteer huge amounts of time, and risk their lives, and use their local knowledge, to save others. The common theme is sacrifice – a concept that really came home to me last Sunday, watching the Remembrance Day commemorations.

    No charity is perfect. Private Eye had a right old go at the RNLI a few years ago, I recall. All have overheads that have to be met somehow, and I do take LP’s points that these are probably minimised when dealing with small charities – however, I think it also fair to point out that larger charities may ultimately have the financial or political clout to achieve greater results.

    While I don’t donate to Comic Relief, I applaud the entertainers who have such a hold over the public using that power for good. I, for one, have no issue with BA teaming up with them.

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    SimonS1
    Participant

    Well Comic Relief accounts are published if you are concerned. I believe between 85% and 90% of money raised is donated to projects and good causes.

    According to the video (5 mins 20 seconds), ‘every penny of which will help children all over the world……’.

    85-90% is not every penny, at least where I come from.

    Here’s the proof

    <iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/-aNXnLRVjjo?feature=oembed” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture” allowfullscreen=”” name=”fitvid0″></iframe>

    Every penny helps because 90% of it gets donated. I imagine that is what they mean.


    FDOS_UK
    Participant

    Well Comic Relief accounts are published if you are concerned. I believe between 85% and 90% of money raised is donated to projects and good causes.

    According to the video (5 mins 20 seconds), ‘every penny of which will help children all over the world……’.

    85-90% is not every penny, at least where I come from.

    Here’s the proof

    <iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/-aNXnLRVjjo?feature=oembed” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture” allowfullscreen=”” name=”fitvid0″></iframe>

    Every penny helps because 90% of it gets donated. I imagine that is what they mean.

    No, 100% of all donations go to good causes, the overheads are paid by sponsorships and other funding sources.

    I believe this is because they are aware of potential cynicism around ‘chugging’.


    Tom Otley
    Keymaster

    I think most charities suffer from this, and there’s a cost to everything – I note that any donation through JustGiving has a 5% fee that the website charges, and also another 1.5% for the credit card processing, so I am invited to add 6.5% just to get the money to the charity, and then, of course, there’s how much in the £1 actually goes to the good cause…


    capetonianm
    Participant

    I resent that JustGiving charge, they make money every which way.

    I’ve recently done a couple of sponsored walks for charity, and donations are via JG. Some people who’ve wanted to donate have contacted me direct, in order to avoid charges and having to give their dog’s DNA etc, and given me the donations as cash or transfers to my bank a/c. I then enter it onto the site as an offline donation which at some point has to be paid across. The only way I can find to do so is by card, so I end up paying the charges.

    Many years ago, I ran the travel account for a large South African charity. One of the directors was a horrible woman and used to travel First Class between CPT and LHR ….. I had words with her and we managed to lose the account. Good riddance, but it went to one of our competitors, of which the manager was a personal friend of mine, and he rang one day and said : “You bastard, we’ve got the XYZ account!” Nobody wanted it.

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