Anti Photo Cabin Staff

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  TiredOldHack2 28 Mar 2019
at 11:26
.

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)

  • EU_Flyer
    Participant

    Tom’s example would be considered as ‘for commercial use’, whereas the scenario I mentioned above was for ‘private use’ and I think that is an important differentiator which I omitted to mention.

    Sadly but not unexpectedly the FA didn’t stop to ask.

    Some airlines run off a management system based on fear, rules and regulations. It’s also a reflection of some cultutres where freedoms are less. Plus, individuals always have personal views which impact how they react.

    I’ve flown TK many times and never had an issue with taking endless selfies to show off that I’m not in economy. They also seem to be on the social media bandwagon including Mr Sam Chui for whom I think they even baked a cake for his inaugural review!

    That said, if a Turkish Airlines flight attendant asked me to stop doing something, I doubt I’d resist much. Law enforcement in Turkey can be brutal and Mr Erdogan always seem to be a in a bad mood.


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    Frankly, I think the OP got off lightly, compared to this experience. Which I think was appalling, by the way.

    In relation to some of the comments above about private property etc, I would feel perfectly entitled to tell someone in my home not to smoke, not to take photographs, not to wear purple, or whatever else I damn well please, subject to laws against discrimination etc. Corporations shouldn’t be any different. I realise this may contradict slightly my reaction to the experience of Live and Let’s Fly, but that is because I think that when you are talking about a public utility (which airlines are), they need to be proportionate. And, as PointyMark eloquently explained, understand that being disproportionate or difficult is likely to have the opposite effect of that which is expected or intended.


    EU_Flyer
    Participant

    And, as PointyMark eloquently explained, understand that being disproportionate or difficult is likely to have the opposite effect of that which is expected or intended.

    Agreed, although proportionality is subjective. If the Flight attendant on Aer Lingus had allowed herself to be photographed without permission she may have been disciplined. Yes, it comes down to each airline’s social media policy (however flexible or rigid), but regardless of whether we think snapping a flight attendant for our blog or facebook is reasonable or not, ultimately if they don’t agree that needs to be respected. I would hate for someone to do me a kind favour outside the scope of their employment, if they didn’t feel comfortable doing it.

    To Fly. To Model.


    alainboy56
    Participant

    To return to the initial problem, being of a certain age, I cannot understand for the life of me why anyone would want to photograph their seat. But then again, I am from a different age, a different era, yes I know, I’m a dinosaur!


    canucklad
    Participant

    But then again, I am from a different age, a different era, yes I know, I’m a dinosaur!

    Not sure that this fascination with recording the most trivial of stuff is new.

    I can recall a flight from Bali back to Amsterdam on Garuda.

    Before boarding , I caught a glimpse of a stereotypical German chap wandering the airport with a rather large, substituting for a monocle , hand held video camera camera.
    Nothing seemed to be too mundane to be captured as he sauntered the expanse of the departure lounge.

    We had bagged emergency exit row seats, so where in prime position as Herr Spielberg boarded , his camera / monocle scanning left and right as he negotiated the busy aisle to his back cabin seat. As he approached our diminutive stewardess , she bowed in traditional greeting. Being polite he acknowledged in kind, as the camera now arced up and down from carpet to ceiling.

    On arrival into Frankfurt , the filming continued as he de-planed.

    I’m assuming his neighbours would have needed a schnapps or twenty to get through the viewing of his holiday movie.


    TiredOldHack2
    Participant

    I know that supermarkets (for instance) regard their property as photo-free zones,

    (Food industry journalist here)

    This is because it’s not unknown for rival supermarkets to take snaps of product ranges, special offers, price tags, etc. It’s still silly.

    As an NUJ member, I carry with me a print-out of precisely what I’m allowed to photograph without seeking permission from anyone or breaking any law. “Most of it” seems to be the answer.


    Ahmad
    Participant

    As an NUJ member, I carry with me a print-out of precisely what I’m allowed to photograph without seeking permission from anyone or breaking any law. “Most of it” seems to be the answer.

    What does it say about UK airports?

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    TiredOldHack2
    Participant

    What does it say about UK airports?

    I’ve just looked it up. It says these ‘may’ be covered by the Official Secrets Act 1911 which forbids taking pictures of a ‘prohibited place’. The list of such places includes ‘Any place belonging to the Civil Aviation Authority’. There’s also a rider: The prohibition only applies to photographs that might be useful to an enemy. In addition, the photograph must have been taken for a “purpose prejudicial to the safety or interests of he State”. People taking innocent photos may be investigated.

    I interpret all that as meaning “It depends”. But, generally, it’s a public place and you can take pix, as long as it’s not for commercial purposes.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    Ahmad
    Participant

    Thank you for your response @tiredoldhack2. As I mentioned earlier in the thread, in many countries photography at airports (especially airside) is illegal even for purely private purposes but the offence is mostly ignored. Having said that, if sinister motive is suspected detention and/or prosecution should not come as a surprise. My mantra: Avoid unnecessary photography in and around airports, particularly of the apron/runway even from outside of the fence/wall looking in and never ever photograph uniformed officials (particularly if they are armed).

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    TiredOldHack2
    Participant

    never ever photograph uniformed officials

    I parsed that as ‘uninformed officials’ and found myself nodding in agreement….

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