Anti Photo Cabin Staff

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  TiredOldHack2 28 Mar 2019
at 11:26
.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)

  • SkyHigh
    Participant

    Travel is a necessity for many and getting a flight is like getting a bus for some people.

    But what of bloggers who remain excited about flight and like to photograph their experience ?

    I had thought that as long as you do not photograph others without their permission,that photos of your seat and meal etc would be a normal thing seeing as most of the world has a camera phone ?

    Shocked to have just been told off by a Turkish Airlines Stewardess for photographing my seat.

    The actual conversation from her was verbatim “No photo,No photo..why you making of cabin photo ?

    Trying not to burst out laughing at her very poor English,I was a touch bemused as this airline wants to be seen as number 1 in social media.

    Was it just my unlucky day or is Turkish Airlines full of paranoid staff ?


    Tom Otley
    Keymaster

    I was in an Aspire lounge last year and there was a sudden commotion as a man was challenged about taking photos.

    He said he was just snapchatting his children… (Meaning the photo was random, the chat on it was the point).

    They still warned him.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    nevereconomy
    Participant

    Totally expected reactions in an industry that has had more than its share of terror incidents. I find it extraordinary in this day and age that anyone would be surprised by the nervousness of airline employees.


    capetonianm
    Participant

    I was told by a woman at Moneygram (BRS Airport) when I took a photo of their outrageous exchange rates the day after the Brexit referendum that it was ‘illegal to take photos anywhere in an airport’. That is of course utter crap. I pointed out to her that by advertising those rates openly they are in the public domain anyway and that she should call the police if I was breaking the law.

    By chance I saw two police officers later and asked them the question and was told, as I already knew, that it’s illegal to take photos in the secured areas of security and passport control, and that it was unwise to take photos of other people’s children, otherwise there are no restrictions.

    I don’t see any reasons why you can’t take photos on board an aircraft, other than the rather unenforceable one of whilst over certain territories.

    4 users thanked author for this post.

    Tom Otley
    Keymaster

    You’re right, but….

    I know that supermarkets (for instance) regard their property as photo-free zones, since long before the advent of camera phones myself and a photographer were asked to leave a Sainsburys car park in London where we were taking some photos (I can’t even remember why, I think it was something to do with car parking). The argument of the staff seemed to be since we were on private property we had no rights to do so. Strange to think of a supermarket as private property when several thousand people went there every day.

    So by extending that argument to an airport, if you walked around with a large DSLR taking photos at Heathrow, I’m pretty sure you’d be told to desist.

    And as you’d expect, when we go there as journalists we need a filming permit even for landside.

    2 users thanked author for this post.

    canucklad
    Participant

    It’s a totally bizarre situation, and I suspect the inconsistencies come with a mixture of cultural considerations as well as business guidelines.
    I’m not sure that I’d be happy about someone coming into my workplace and starting to snap away.

    I’ve taken photos on plane’s all the time. I’m currently trying to create a collage of in-flight pictures and haven’t been challenged.

    In fact we got a group photo with cabin crew on many a tartan army trip.

    So by extending that argument to an airport, if you walked around with a large DSLR taking photos at Heathrow, I’m pretty sure you’d be told to desist.

    But, would they stop you if you pulled out your fancy dancy phone with its inbuilt advanced camera ….probably not!


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Tom’s example would be considered as ‘for commercial use’, whereas the scenario I mentioned above was for ‘private use’ and I think that is an important differentiator which I omitted to mention.

    I believe you may take photographs of ‘private’ property from public space as long as they are not intrusive, but if you are on private property, different rules apply.


    Ahmad
    Participant

    Many countries have laws prohibiting photography at airports both landslide and airside. In most of these, the no-photography laws are largely ignored but some take them very seriously. As pointed out by @capetonianm, some countries have even banned ANY airborne photography without prior permission. Obviously, such laws are archaic and virtually unenforceable with the advent of built-in cameras in many electronic devices. However, so long as they are on the statute book one is always exposed to potential criminal prosecution and caution should be exercised when taking pictures at airports or in the air.

    With regard to airlines banning photography, they may or may not be within their rights depending on the jurisdiction of their aircraft’s registration. In most countries it is legal for them to impose such restrictions. Unless you know the jurisdiction of the aircraft’s registration and whether banning photography is not legal there, if a member of the crew stops you from taking pictures it will be ill-advised to continue unless the instruction is expressly overruled by a more senior crew member.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    AircraftLover
    Participant

    I agree with you

    There are many countries, where it is forbidden to take pictures at the airport

    Worldwide, it is forbidden to take a picture in any airport’s security and passport control


    canucklad
    Participant

    The aspect of this commentary, yet to be considered is the sadly topical sharing of images via social media.

    On a personal note, I was filmed enjoying myself at a works day out, a team building exercise that didn’t quite go to plan resulting in a hilarious blooper. My colleague innocently uploaded the coverage onto her Facebook page. She has quite a following and as a consequence I was verbally attacked by a stranger who recognized me whilst I was out on a night out. She thought my behaviour was inappropriate and I should consider getting another job more suitable for my talents. I think she suggested becoming a bin man.

    I tried to explain the full context of the “private” clip ,alas her moral high ground had already shut her ears to my reasoned explanation, and so I just had to put up with abuse until an opportunity to escape arose. Unpleasant for me, and almost ruined the night out.

    I now share with my colleagues and friends my simple mantra…” Remember, you’re only 1 click away from being an internet sensation”

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    PointyMark
    Participant

    Dear SkyHigh; I’m an Avgeek and a blogger and normally have no probs taking photos onboard – even on Chinese carriers. But last month on Aer Lingus DUB-LGW I was admiring the FA’s uniforms and asked them if I could take a photo for my blog. One told me to wait a minute while she went into the cockpit to ask the Skipper. She came back to say I couldn’t take a photo without the prior authorisation of management. I laughed and said, “so instead of me writing a positive piece about your smart uniforms, Are Lingus would prefer me to write about how beaurocratic and restrictive it is?!”

    4 users thanked author for this post.

    SkyHigh
    Participant

    Hi all.

    Taking a photo of one’s on a personal mobile is hardly a mass photo session !

    I am sure as long as I do not photograph a person/persons without their consent then it is no big deal.

    PointyMark it is funny you mention Aer Lingus. I have just read some reviews on flight-report.com and it seems they are like Turkish in that they just cannot produce any written proof of photos being allowed / not allowed. Although the writer did get photos with crew ?

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    MartynSinclair
    Participant

    You would think the USA is one country who should be more nervous than any other for people to take photographs inside airports. However, it is a constitutional right (apparently) for people to use cameras with any Government or public official of which TSA agents are considered.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVjTCRovfxQ – 18 minute version

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEecefl95sg – 8 minute version

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdXmskTh43o – 7 minute version


    James
    Participant

    I completely understand rational nervousness. But being scared of pssengers taking photos of the seat is like declaring a knife onboard as a terrorist incident when it’s the cutlery you’ve just given them.

    I’d at least be less surprised if it was a twitchy airline like El Al, my experience of Turkish has been pretty decent.

    Sounds like the FA was on the lower end of the IQ scale.


    nevereconomy
    Participant

    James – the last line of your post hopefully does not do you justice. Because we are not always allowed to do as we think fit
    does not mean the other party is foolish.

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