B737 MAX – Will You Fly on One ?

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This topic contains 92 replies, has 34 voices, and was last updated by  AFlyingDutchman 18 Jul 2019
at 07:32
.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 93 total)

  • cwoodward
    Participant

    I rather hope that they will also be re-designing it and I am of the opinion that finally be the case.

    From what I have been reading the compensation claims for the grounding and non delivery are already more than US$15 billion.
    Big management changes at Boeing ahead I suspect.


    Swissdiver
    Participant

    Big management changes at Boeing ahead I suspect.

    I don’t see indeed how any management could survive such a fiasco (excepted at BA of course).


    AFlyingDutchman
    Participant

    Would I fly one? Yes, once cleared, I would. There is no doubt by the time it returns to the skies it will be the most scrutinised aircarft in modern day, and for sure, its not the first aircraft to have been grounded after tradgedy to then return to the skies after corrections have been made. What I just hope is that this has taught the FAA that they must never skirt their oversight on safety again, ever.

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    To restore confidence in the MAX it’s reported AA managers will fly on this plane before fare-paying passengers.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-06-12/american-air-managers-to-join-crews-on-737-max-before-passengers


    capetonianm
    Participant

    Well, yes, but no ….!

    Asked if I would fly on a Max after it’s been cleared as safe, then the answer is unreservedly yes, insofar as safety is concerned.

    What tempts me to boycott Boeing’s products, and I realise it’s totally impractical to do so, is the evasive and underhand way they dealt with this known problem. A few hundred lives might have been saved if they had been more open and honest prior to putting the aircraft into commercial service. It leaves a bad taste.

    It’s rather like a restaurant I had favoured for a long time, then went there and had an atrocious meal which was compounded by the rudeness of the manager. I escalated the complaint, was offered an apology, a refund, and a free meal, but I haven’t been back and I won’t. Bad taste again (literally!).

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    capetonianm
    Participant

    SimonS1
    Participant

    Interesting article on the “Battle Over Blame”.

    Looks like Boeing have enlisted help from Congressmen to help deflect some blame…..with the number of lawsuits backing up this could be interesting times for Boeing.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/extra/sd9LGK2S9m/battle_over_blame


    AMcWhirter
    Participant

    capetonianm
    Participant

    That will inspire confidence. Not.

    A rose by any other name!


    nevereconomy
    Participant

    Thw whole thing very simple – perfect example of what happens when an industry is too close (in this case in the pocket$$) of a government, a body of which overseas it. Incidentally a very common occurrence in the US – food another very good example.


    JohnnyG
    Participant

    Well with Boeing wanting some good news, WW must have got an extremely good price for this IAG order of 200 Max 8’s and 10’s, $24 billion at list price.

    Still want to fly on one?


    Swissdiver
    Participant

    Well with Boeing wanting some good news, WW must have got an extremely good price for this IAG order of 200 Max 8’s and 10’s, $24 billion at list price.

    Still want to fly on one?

    Yep. And I hope these will replace numbers of joystick planes (aka Airbus)!

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    I am torn on this issue. On the one hand I tend to be somewhat fatalistic (if it’s going to happen, it’s going to happen). On the other hand, my trust in the airframe and, most particularly, Boeing’s ability to make it work properly has been badly shaken, just as it was when B787s started spontaneously combusting. Unlike Swissdiver I have a general preference for Airbus – not just because their safety record at the moment is somewhat better, but because Airbus seem to put more focus on the passenger. The A350 beats the B787 into a cocked hat – it feels much more spacious, you can stay in control of your window blind (and it actually stops all the light coming in), I personally think the air quality is just as good, and so forth. Similarly give me an A320/321 over a B737 any day, it also feels more spacious and the extra space increases passenger comfort.

    I can’t say I really understand the arguments about joysticks versus yokes, but it is quite apparent that in the B737 disasters the pilots weren’t able to use the yokes to control the aircraft (whether through lack of proper training on MCAS, lack of strength to exert the required force (what was it, something like 60kg? – or to put it another way, the weight of an average medium height woman) or whatever). Frankly, based on evidence to date, I would much rather be in a plane controlled by joystick with three AoA sensors and a system that ignores a minority report (Airbus) than a system which only has one, a fault in which could lead to a scenario where the pilots can’t control the plane, and particularly where the aircraft has been manufactured by a company that recognised the potential problem this could cause, designed and manufactured workarounds (alarm systems, visual displays and so forth) and then made them optional, while at the same time self-certifying the aircraft as safe (Boeing).

    At the moment my concerns about the B737 Max, and Boeing’s approach to its safety, mean I have put it on my no-fly list and it is likely to stay there until it has been operating safely for two years or so – much as I did with the B787

    4 users thanked author for this post.

    Swissdiver
    Participant

    12cm. This is the cabin width difference between the so called extra-wide A350 and the B787 (i.e. about 2%). Having flown both on the same airline (QR) with the same product, I can say you cannot see the difference. So the impression of extra-room is purely subjective! Then the air quality is undoubtedly better on the B787. As for the windows’ blinds, it is a matter of preference.

    Yokes bring more than the ability to effectively fly the plane in case of problems (provided pilots are trained properly which obviously was not the case with the B737 Max). It also helps crew coordinating their action. One of the reason often mentioned for the AF447 incident was the fact the captain could not see what the pilot was doing, which led to the crash of this A330.


    IanFromHKG
    Participant

    Thank you SwissDiver, I think you have admirably supported my point. The AF447 incident occurred a decade ago. Any incidents since then? None that I’m aware of. I therefore think it’s safe to say that if that is the best you can come up with, the case against joysticks is based on outdated evidence, while the case against Boeing is extremely current.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 93 total)
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